Chins, get me started.

#1
Being an upper-body free zone I'm trying to build myself up, specifically I want to be able to 10 or so chins (over arm grip) in addition to all the standard press-ups, etc. As I'm so weak I can hardly even manage 3, any advice for getting started (I'm 6' about 11 3/4 st)?
 
#2
stand on a chair it helps me alot :)

sorry only kidding

lie with your shoulders in line with the edge of a low sturdy table (you head should be underneath the table) grip the edge with your hands keeping your feet on the floor and pull yourself up until your shoulders nearly meet the table hold for a couple of seconds then lower. these should be done as slowly as possible and under control!

with your weight you should have no problems!

and eat loads of protein to build yourself up!

blondy :p
 
#3
chins are a sod , I have had a chinny bar for over a year now and my pb is 5

Best practice , get a bar £7 or so from argos

Put it in the kitchen doorway

Everytime you go to the fridge do as many chins as possible

same goes for pressups

Everytime there's an ad break on squeeze out as many as you can do

Beast yourself , no one else will

I'm fitter now than when I joined up , I run @ 20 miles a week and x train in between , that's not to say I'm a fitness freak , just getting older so have to work harder
 
#4
Train with a mate - the RI's at Sandhurst had all the Y-Listers doing this and it works brilliantly.

6 under-arm pull-ups
10 dips
Ten reps of the above. When you're unable to do any more pull-ups, get your mate to put his hands under your knee and help you - even if you need help from the word go (most people needed help from the second rep onwards... weeeeeeak....)

This really does work, I've never been good at pull-ups and I'm kicking their arrse nowadays thanks to the above.
 
#5
If you want to loose weight and be able to do more chin ups, Then you have to start doing an exercise called "push aways". That is where you push away from the dinning table and stop eating all the pies.
 
#6
One of the fastest, and safest, methods is "negative drops". With this, you grip the bar with your finger wrapping over it towards you and pull yourself up as far as you can. Hold for as long as possible, then let yourself down VERY SLOWLY. Rest for a minute or longer and repeat as many times as you like.
You say in the "over arm grip". There are two possibilities here: either with your knuckles towards you or facing away from you. You'll find pull-ups much easier with your knuckles facing away from you. When they're reversed, it's much harder. The muscle you're exercising is the biceps, and "bi" means two, i.e. two parts to it. You can see this more easily if you stand sideways on to a mirror with the back of your fist facing the floor and contract your bicep. You'll see it bunch more to the top of your arm. If you then turn your fist inward 90 degrees so that the little-finger side is facing the floor and contract your bicep, you'll see that the contraction reaches down much further towards your elbow. These are the two parts of the bicep. At a later stage in your conditioning, it's a good idea to alternate grips so that both parts of the muschle are exercised.

MsG
 
#7
Use a Lat/Pulldown machine, most gyms have one. These will work the same muscles you use in pull-ups.
The Nautilus Weight-assisted Chin-Up is a smart piece of kit, but not every gym has one. Basically, you kneel on a platform attached to a stack of weights. You select the weight, grab the bar and pull yourself up. The weights counter-balance you, making it easier. As you get stronger you use less weight.
Good luck.
 
#8
Thanks for the responses.

I've been down the gym every couple of days all summer and I've tried a few things. Whilst still not really able to do wide arm over arm pull ups I can do about 8 (depending on previous night's beer intake) narrow grip under arm ones. I've tried those assisted pull up machines but short of puttings huge amounts of assisting weight on I can't really do them there either. I have however used the lat pull down to some effect.

I'll continue my programme and hopefully develop enough muscle strength to do them! Maybe I'll drop by the sports office and ask the PTIs to run me up a quick strength programme as my training hasn't had much structure to it.
 
#9
You've had the best of advice on here, now try doing it just once a week and stay off the lash the night before, sounds like you're not really putting in the sustained effort. Stick to the machine or assisted pull-ups and do it to failure every time, no more than 4-5 sets and have a good few days rest between sessions.
 
#10
I've been in a similar situation, trying to build upper body strength at the gym with limited success despite going several times a week. Found the solution by chance, went with a mate to the local climbing wall one day after work. Climbing really works your back, shoulders and arms and legs, and is great fun. As you get stronger (and technically better) you can start climbing harder grades to keep the progress up. way more motivating than just trying to add an extra weight on the machines at the gym every week or so.
I stopped paying stupid gym prices and went to climbing wall two/three times a week instead, am now much stronger and actually have fun with mates keeping in shape.

Disadvatnages- need a climbing wall nearby, have to rent/buy harness (50 quid to buy), need a mate to belay you (holding other end of rope). also not exactly a cardio workout.

If your lucky and where you are based has a wall then check it out, otherwise get yellow pages out and ring the local centre to see what they offer, might have beginners sessions or something.

hope that helps!
 
#11
Get a chin bar from argos

Fit bar in doorway to kitchen

Every time you go for the pies do as many chinnies as possible

works for me

Same with pressups

When watching telly , everytime there is a commercial break on , crack out as many press ups as possible

You have 40 in a row to beat and I'm an old fart now
 
#12
I'm always thinking about cracking one out during the commercials, but I'm not talking about press-ups ... you must be a nightmare for the other half, a typical night in must involve upwards of 200+ press-ups and pull-ups ?!!
 
#14
"The muscle you're exercising is the biceps, and "bi" means two, i.e. two parts to it. You can see this more easily if you stand sideways on to a mirror with the back of your fist facing the floor and contract your bicep. You'll see it bunch more to the top of your arm. If you then turn your fist inward 90 degrees so that the little-finger side is facing the floor and contract your bicep, you'll see that the contraction reaches down much further towards your elbow. These are the two parts of the bicep. "

Bugsy, as a Physiotherapist i feel the need to correct you here - the 'bi' in bicep does indeed refer to it having two parts, or 'heads', the long head and the short head. However, the muscle originates from two different parts of the scapular - from the glenoid cavity (the shoulder joint socket) and the coracoid process (a 'finger' of bone pointing forwards inside the shoulder joint area - difficult to describe exactly where without using technical terms), before the muscle bellies join, attaching to the forearm via a single tendon. What you are describing is the bicep brachii (bicep) when your palm is upwards, and nearer to elbow is coracobrachialis, which comes into play more with the hand palm down, as biceps is disadvantaged slightly in this position.

Good advice though!! Negative drops - working the muscle while it is lengthening (excentric muscle work) is an excellent strength training tool. :eek:)

Sorry for the pedantic rant - please forgive me!!
 
#15
I'm a fat c@nt with 3 chins, I'll sell you two.
 
#16
Dizz said:
"The muscle you're exercising is the biceps, and "bi" means two, i.e. two parts to it. You can see this more easily if you stand sideways on to a mirror with the back of your fist facing the floor and contract your bicep. You'll see it bunch more to the top of your arm. If you then turn your fist inward 90 degrees so that the little-finger side is facing the floor and contract your bicep, you'll see that the contraction reaches down much further towards your elbow. These are the two parts of the bicep. "

Bugsy, as a Physiotherapist i feel the need to correct you here - the 'bi' in bicep does indeed refer to it having two parts, or 'heads', the long head and the short head. However, the muscle originates from two different parts of the scapular - from the glenoid cavity (the shoulder joint socket) and the coracoid process (a 'finger' of bone pointing forwards inside the shoulder joint area - difficult to describe exactly where without using technical terms), before the muscle bellies join, attaching to the forearm via a single tendon. What you are describing is the bicep brachii (bicep) when your palm is upwards, and nearer to elbow is coracobrachialis, which comes into play more with the hand palm down, as biceps is disadvantaged slightly in this position.

Good advice though!! Negative drops - working the muscle while it is lengthening (excentric muscle work) is an excellent strength training tool. :eek:)

Sorry for the pedantic rant - please forgive me!!
I appreciate your input, Dizz, I really do! My advice was canted towards people who have very little knowledge of the way in which our muscles actually work. I realise I was using descriptions for sixth graders, but that's sometimes the only way to get through to people, as I'm sure you know!

MsG
 
#17
some people are getting very confused here... including me.

All this talk about bicep heads and all that bollocks, the chin up is a classic compound movement, it uses many muscle groups, but primarily it uses the back muscles.

Do 10 sets of chins and tell me whats sore the next day!
 
#18
bulldoze said:
some people are getting very confused here... including me.

All this talk about bicep heads and all that balls, the chin up is a classic compound movement, it uses many muscle groups, but primarily it uses the back muscles.

Do 10 sets of chins and tell me whats sore the next day!
I just KNEW something like this was going to happen! That's why I tried to keep it as simple as possible.

Bulldoze, if you manage to do even one chin-up by PRIMARILY using your back muscles (and without using your arms), I'll personally guarantee you a blow-job from Joan Collins.
S'hett Lüut!!!

MsG
 
#20
Bugsy7 said:
I appreciate your input, Dizz, I really do! My advice was canted towards people who have very little knowledge of the way in which our muscles actually work. I realise I was using descriptions for sixth graders, but that's sometimes the only way to get through to people, as I'm sure you know!

MsG
Once again, sorry for being pedantic - merely wanted to say that you were describing two different muscles as opposed to two parts of the same one. Prob just wanted to show off as have only just qualified as a physio and have had to resort to office work due to the current jobs crisis, so the opportunity to use what i learned was too good to pass up!!

As for those who are confused, don't worry about the shape of the muscles. What Bugsy said earlier is all you need to know - the bicep can work more effectively when you pull up under-arm, hence this is easier, while they are unable to work so well over-arm making it more difficult. Training both ways can be really good - you can do more reps under-arm so build up more stamina, and over-arm is harder so you can build up more strenth. Developing the muscle in different positions for slightly different movements also means better all-round quality and strength of muscle.
 

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