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Chinese Spaceplane

Yokel

LE
They are working on a chow manned mission to Mars.


( not sorry )

You want a Chow Mein stage with rocket noodles - spicy one that heat comes from, with some spring roll boosters?

your point being?

the thing is - this is all assuming the chinese want to do whatever it is the americans are doing with the X-37. so unless their aims are the same, it's all a massive speculation. I'd bet nothing the US are doing with the X-37 couldn't be done with a capsule you could recover on land (the only reason their manned spaceships have landed at sea is that it's a softer landing - the russians got around that by initially ejecting the cosmonaut in Vostok when they reached a suitable altitude and had them come down by parachute, then in subsequent flights by having a landing rocket fire a couple of seconds before the capsule reached the ground, cushioning the impact. not nearly as much of an issue for an unmanned craft) and the costs wouldn't probably be that much different.

I thought the reason Soviet spacecraft landed on land was because of their land mass, and the Americans recovered them at sea because they had the naval forces to do so - and it was helpful to remind the Soviets of that.
 
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maguire

LE
Book Reviewer
You want a Chow Mein stage with rocket noodles - spicy one that heat comes from, with some spring rolls boosters?



I thought the reason Soviet spacecraft landed on land was because of their land mass, and the Americans recovered them at sea because they had the naval forces to do so - and it was helpful to remind the Soviets of that.

I think there was also a big dose of paranoia and secrecy as well. under FAI rules Gargarins flight wouldn't 'officially' have counted as the first manned orbital flight, as he wasn't in the capsule at touchdown - it wasn't until years later they admitted he'd ejected and landed seperately.
 

Yokel

LE
I think there was also a big dose of paranoia and secrecy as well. under FAI rules Gargarins flight wouldn't 'officially' have counted as the first manned orbital flight, as he wasn't in the capsule at touchdown - it wasn't until years later they admitted he'd ejected and landed seperately.

Next you will saying something about Communists not obeying rules - no, that would never happen. So John Glenn really was the first one to do it all from take off to splash down, and Al Shepard did the first manned landing of a spacecraft?

Back in the nineties, I remember seeing a programme about the Russian Mir space station, and it was said that one of the reasons Moscow was keen on it was to use the weightless environment to grow crystals for the semiconductor industry. I wonder if that is still sought?
 

maguire

LE
Book Reviewer
Next you will saying something about Communists not obeying rules - no, that would never happen. So John Glenn really was the first one to do it all from take off to splash down, and Al Shepard did the first manned landing of a spacecraft?

Back in the nineties, I remember seeing a programme about the Russian Mir space station, and it was said that one of the reasons Moscow was keen on it was to use the weightless environment to grow crystals for the semiconductor industry. I wonder if that is still sought?

in theory, you can grow them far purer and bigger in microgravity than you can on earth. by now, according to a lot of futurists and writers both serious and fictional back in the seventies and eighties, we should have had dozens of orbital factories up serviced by fleets of space shuttles.

what they didn't take into account was Nasa lying through their teeth about how much the shuttle was actually going to cost to fly (both financially and in terms of man hours) and the arse falling out of the Soviet Union (so they could no longer afford to keep funding their space effort.)

here's a what-if scenario for you - if the sovs had made a serious stab at orbital manufacturing and not p1ssed their roubles up the wall trying to keep up with Ronnie's spending in the eighties, could they have become a real economic force off the back of it? up to the ISS flying they were far farther along than Nasa in terms of long endurance spaceflight experience.

however, with the Shuttle being what it was, the bootstrap effect people thought was going to happen never did. whether Space X is going to be the equivalent of the 707 in terms of access to earth orbit is still unknown. if Musk or whoever isn't thinking about asteroid mining somewhere along the line as well I'd be amazed. but there will come that point where all of a sudden the benefits will outweigh the costs and it'll be a new gold rush.
 

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