Chinese ships will fight pirates

#1
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/7789303.stm

Chinese ships will fight pirates


Seven Chinese ships or crews have been attacked off Somalia this year
China has announced it is to send naval ships to fight rampant piracy in the Gulf of Aden off the coast of Somalia.
State media suggested the force could consist of two destroyers and a supply ship, although officials did not confirm the details of the deployment.
On Wednesday, Malaysian naval forces helped foil an attempt to hijack a Chinese ship by Somali pirates.
The latest operation is a first for Beijing, which has until now pursued a policy of military non-interference.
China's navy, along with the rest of its military, does not often stray far from home, says the BBC's Quentin Sommerville in Beijing.
But China's military spending has increased dramatically in recent years as its armed forces undergo a thorough modernisation, our correspondent says.
The US and Japan, are among those who have expressed increasing disquiet about the country's rapid military expansion.
UN resolution
Foreign ministry spokesman Liu Jianchao told journalists that preparations to dispatch the vessels were under way.
He said further details would be provided when the operation was formally announced.
But the state-run Global Times newspaper said two destroyers and one supply ship would depart from a Chinese naval base on Hainan island after 25 December.
On Wednesday the UN Security Council unanimously approved a resolution allowing foreign military forces to pursue pirates on land in Somalia, though Secretary General Ban Ki-moon has said the time is not right for such a mission.
Pirates foiled
Four or five Chinese ships pass through the Gulf of Aden every day.
Seven Chinese ships or crews have been attacked in the busy shipping channel this year, Mr Liu said.
On Wednesday, the Zhenhua 4 was attacked by Somali pirates.
The crew used water cannon and bottles to try to fight off their attackers, according to local media reports. But it was the intervention of Malaysian naval forces, with support from other countries, that thwarted the pirates.
Sorry if it's been done before.

This seems a very significant change in Chinese military policy.
 
#2
Interesting stuff, bl00dy beeb though, doesn't say if they're going to be integrated with the other forces or working independantly...
 
#3
It's some big muscles China has got, needs to flex 'em from time to time.
 
#4
From IHT
China's navy, officially known as the People's Liberation Army Navy, has long concentrated on coastal defense and regional maneuvers. But in recent years it has embarked on an ambitious modernization plan. The principal mission for Chinese naval vessels in the Gulf of Aden would presumably be the escorting of Chinese cargo ships and oil tankers from the Middle East bound for Chinese ports. Policing patrols, some maritime experts suggested, would be secondary. But Mody said Thursday it would be important for the Chinese effort to be melded "on an operational level" with other navies already patrolling in the gulf. The European Union recently launched an antipiracy operation in the gulf, and several other nations have a naval presence there, including ships from India, the United States and Russia.
http://www.iht.com/articles/2008/12/18/news/19PIRATES.php
 

BrunoNoMedals

LE
Kit Reviewer
#6
It's a win-win for the Chinese. They can protect their shipping and boost their rapidly-expanding markets, while giving their new modern Navy a decent run-out to see how they perform and get some experience. All the while they'll be doing so in a setting that makes them look bold and decisive while fighting (what the majority see as) a good and worthwhile cause - particularly if they do it jointly with other nations or at the least work to protect non-Chinese shipping where they can.
 
#7
BrunoNoMedals said:
It's a win-win for the Chinese. They can protect their shipping and boost their rapidly-expanding markets, while giving their new modern Navy a decent run-out to see how they perform and get some experience. All the while they'll be doing so in a setting that makes them look bold and decisive while fighting (what the majority see as) a good and worthwhile cause - particularly if they do it jointly with other nations or at the least work to protect non-Chinese shipping where they can.
Agree. The amount of goodwill they will generate from this will do them no harm. Now I wonder if they will hand out summary justice too? It was the way the Somalis themselves stopped piracy a few years ago before the country went to rats.

edited once for mong fingers
 

BrunoNoMedals

LE
Kit Reviewer
#8
in_the_cheapseats said:
BrunoNoMedals said:
It's a win-win for the Chinese. They can protect their shipping and boost their rapidly-expanding markets, while giving their new modern Navy a decent run-out to see how they perform and get some experience. All the while they'll be doing so in a setting that makes them look bold and decisive while fighting (what the majority see as) a good and worthwhile cause - particularly if they do it jointly with other nations or at the least work to protect non-Chinese shipping where they can.
Agree. The amount of goodwill they will generate from this. Now I wonder if they will hand out summary justice too? It was the way the Somalis themselves stopped piracy a few years ago before the country went to rats.
I wouldn't be surprised. They have the "benefit" of knowing the general global opinion of them, and the fact that they're big enough not to give a monkey's. If they topped a few pirates, destroyed a few boats, I don't think the public would really mind - in fact I think many would applaud them (I would). Some governments and 'ooman rites goons would moan, and people would ignore them.

That said, the Chinese may feel some need to pander to foreign opinion and hold back a little for the sake of diplomacy. In this case, I hope not!
 
#9
Can't see the Chinese getting to hung up over the Human Rights Act / Asylum Seekers / Pirates / RoE

msr
 
#10
Read a report in on of the rags yesterday from someone who spent a bit of time talking to some of the pirates.

They are not in the least bit worried by the operation that is ongoing at the moment as they either a) wait until the big grey ships have shoved off before going after a cargo ship or b) get captured and given a trip back to shore (only thing that the Navies can do to them).

I do hope the Chinese decide to save a bit of time and fuel and just sink them.
 
#11
What's the betting the number of Pirates the Chinese capture alive, will be at a ratio of Zero per engagement :)
 
#12
It'll be interesting to see how they make out-the latest referances I can make out for the PLAN actually engaging in combat was the Battle of the Paracel Islands in 1974 against the South vietnamese, and a skirmish with the Vietnamese in '88, no referance I can find to any naval fighting in 1979, they've certainly invested a lot in new kit and training, but their doctrine is unconfirmed by actual experience, so will be interesting to see how well they do...
 
#13
Their young men should have loads of fun, hopefully sinking pirates and machine-gunning the survivors in the water. China also gets to increase her naval presence around Indonesia and the Indian Ocean en route in a manner that is UN approved and non-threatening to India. Trebles all round!
 
#14
PLAN has always been the weakest element of the PLA and China has no real tradition of overseas power-projection, so it'll be interesting to see how they cope. For my money, they'll be 'correct' in their treatment of any prisoners but won't go out of their way to acquire any.

Their Marines are supposed to be pretty good, though. Perhaps some representatives of the Indian Marines might confirm, I've heard they staged joint exercises recently?
 

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#15
msr said:
Can't see the Chinese getting to hung up over the Human Rights Act / Asylum Seekers / Pirates / RoE

msr
Let that be a lesson to the rest of us. Want to attack a ship on the open seas with weapons . . . . . maritime act of war . . . . . get shot up and die . . . . job done.

All this human rights/ROE bowlarks is a crippling waste of time. Simple answer is to shoot the attacking boat to pieces and kill the occupants - let's see how long it remains a popular pastime off the Somali coast.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
#16
Don't underestimate the Chinese, or the courage and ability of their ordinary bods. If PLA(N) has the right bod at the top, the Chinese could show themselves pretty clued up. Think back to how Gorshkov (?sp) turned the Red navy from rubbish into a credible force with worldwide reach (until the USSR ran out of money).
 
#17
Were there not rumours of the chinese navy being involved in piracy themselves? Odd cargo ship disapearing and then reappearing with a new name and crew .
 
#18
Oh, I'm sure the Chinese will be quite happy to capture a few pirates... would provide a guilt free means to create additional "Bodies in Motion" tours without ll those nasty inferences to political prisoners and such. ;)
 
#20
The only way I see us fixing this situation is another UN mission into Somalia. The place is in absolute anarchy and its destabilising more than just the Gulf of Aden. Of course with British forces stretched to breaking point and the US already with enough on its plate, nothing will happen. Our ever so helpful allies at the UN won't do it on their own, they don't do very much even when we go in and hold their hands.

Oddly enough, China would be best place to take serious action, what with their close ties in the Sudan. Not that they will do anything, nor would we necessarily want them to.
 

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