Chinese interested in Djibouti

Actually no. I have friends from different races and cultures. I don't equate race with culture. I'm talking about culture here.

I've seen how the older generation from different cultures struggles to cope with 21st century Britain and even come into conflict with their offsprings when they adopt Western ways. If that isn't a cultural clash I don't know what is.



I struggle to read your posts...........




They're SHITE.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
A friend of mine from Zim tells me the same story, plenty of Chinese with their own airstrips, housing, shops etc hardly if ever seen by the locals.
Mirrors exactly what my friends from there tell me
they dont employ local labour, only use there own, and seem to have lots of fit young men with crewcuts
plus they are not pleased to see cameras being used and have a habit of being clumsy with photographers
 
@Tinman74 - is that the case though ? My parents/in laws generation growing up in the UK/Aus and going through a world war and the social upheavals that followed in the 50's and 60's had a very European centric view of what was going on. The same generation growing up in Malaya and Singapore experienced something completely different. Their children going to boarding school and uni in the UK had a completely different view of the world when they came back to those who didn't go abroad. Some had married and the extended family with the granddad rules the roost rules can as a shock to their European spouses. Ditto those parents who went to join their folks in Australia/NZ or the UK. There they were not the centre of the family as they had been in Malaya/Singapore.
 
T

Tinman74

Guest
@Tinman74 - is that the case though ? My parents/in laws generation growing up in the UK/Aus and going through a world war and the social upheavals that followed in the 50's and 60's had a very European centric view of what was going on. The same generation growing up in Malaya and Singapore experienced something completely different. Their children going to boarding school and uni in the UK had a completely different view of the world when they came back to those who didn't go abroad. Some had married and the extended family with the granddad rules the roost rules can as a shock to their European spouses. Ditto those parents who went to join their folks in Australia/NZ or the UK. There they were not the centre of the family as they had been in Malaya/Singapore.
My studies on this and other sociological issues are that, each generation re-invents it self, not all that generation break from the stereotypical norms.

For example how many IRA recruits came from "normal" families in the late 50's 60 etc? There is a reason people turn to a safety net, a place where they are accepted and share ideas.

It's societies fault as a whole that those that end up radicalised are not offered a different path.

Look at the media at the moment if it isn't radicalised Muslims brassing up bystanders it's dirt darts hitting the ground, ad infinitum.

Take the colour and religion out of the equation it all boils down to how you were brought up, expectations, peer pressure and self determination.

There's papers about how immigration to this country has improved the UK massively with out loosing there own identity.
 
There's papers telling us that the case, indeed. But then there's those telling us that changing culture means loosing cultures. How much of Welsh culture survives and how has it been massively improved by successive waves of invaders\immigrants ?
 
T

Tinman74

Guest
There's papers telling us that the case, indeed. But then there's those telling us that changing culture means loosing cultures. How much of Welsh culture survives and how has it been massively improved by successive waves of invaders\immigrants ?
Well we wouldn't be speaking English if we didn't adapt and learn.
 
MHO is that improvement is in the eye of the beholder. I sometimes wonder what British enclaves in Spain do for the cultural enhancement of the locals, because apart from money, the improvement to the food and literature is beyond me.

,
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
MHO is that improvement is in the eye of the beholder. I sometimes wonder what British enclaves in Spain do for the cultural enhancement of the locals, because apart from money, the improvement to the food and literature is beyond me.

,
keeps them all in one place ready for judgement day !!
 

Mr_Fingerz

LE
Book Reviewer
Heh Heh Heh The girls will be waiting with baited bushes for the arrival of the inscrutable.
 

Sixty

ADC
Moderator
Book Reviewer
It appears that the Chinese are showing increased interest in establishing a footprint in Djibouti.

China Seeks Djibouti Access; Who’s A Hegemon Now?

It will be interesting to see the US reaction. The French will also not be very happy, but they have considerably downsized their presence there anyway.

The Djiboutian government has always been very keen to extract the maximum rent possible from its strategic location.

On the economic front, Djibouti is also the coastal anchor for the Addis Ababa railway and has great potential to expand as a cargo trans-shipment hub
Oddly, this post was quoted in The Guardian today (but calm down, only in the comments section).

Trade wars? Africa has been a victim of them for years | Afua Hirsch
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
BiL just returned from Djibouti, interesting to say the least, yes the Chinese are there but so are the French still.
 

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