China's homebrew airliner?

China unveils passenger jet C919 - BBC News

Wish it luck? Engines , leccies, looms, and "stuffs" are supplied "from around the world"
Wings etc Made in China.
Nowt wrong with keeping Boeing & Euro-manufacturers honest.
However, if you are old enough to recall Concordski.....
I wonder.......
Good job that Boeing and Airbus don't trust the Chinese to build their components isn't it?
 
It was always on the cards. There's no reason why they couldn't build a modern jetliner to western safety standards.
The PRC have money, patience, good engineers and a workforce thats cheap and wants a job. They will get there. We laughed at Jap motorbikes once. Not anymore.
 
It was always on the cards. There's no reason why they couldn't build a modern jetliner to western safety standards.
The PRC have money, patience, good engineers and a workforce thats cheap and wants a job. They will get there. We laughed at Jap motorbikes once. Not anymore.
Hmm. Whilst I would like to think so, I don't think you can for from 'Let's build one of the most complex modern machines on the planet' to ' Here we go' without expecting...erm...'unforeseen issues' later on.
I can't see western airlines clamouring to buy them any time soon until they have let other far east regional airlines beta test them first.
 
Comac C919 - Wikipedia

It's called reverse engineering. You buy one, measure it up and copy it with a few mods to make it look like it's yours. The Chinese have been doing it for years.

Note also that the Chinese play a very long game an will happily work for 25 years to develop something better than Airbux / Boeing.
 

Slime

LE
China unveils passenger jet C919 - BBC News

Wish it luck? Engines , leccies, looms, and "stuffs" are supplied "from around the world"
Wings etc Made in China.
Nowt wrong with keeping Boeing & Euro-manufacturers honest.
However, if you are old enough to recall Concordski.....
I wonder.......

Its a real shame the Charger (Tu144) didnt succeed in airline service.
There are many people who believe that if the Charger had stayed in service that the Americans would have continued with their SST designs which in turn would have neccesitated them to drop opposition for Concord noise levels. Concord could have got more of its anticipated airline orders and the UK/France would have had a 'nice earner' :)

The Charger crash wasn't the first airshow incident following rapid display changes and hasn't been the last.
 
It was always on the cards. There's no reason why they couldn't build a modern jetliner to western safety standards.
The PRC have money, patience, good engineers and a workforce thats cheap and wants a job. They will get there. We laughed at Jap motorbikes once. Not anymore.
Also, they're very good at hacking.
 
It's called reverse engineering.
Which is hard and can often cost more than a new and fresh design. Fake goods are one thing, airliners are something different.
 
When the Chinese built copies of the Mig 19s, Pakistan bought them and found that they were exact copies to the point of including Russian errors but also found that they were of better quality than Russian Migs and had longer engine service lives (at a time when 200 hrs between overhaul was considered good) and they found that the fit of panels was much better. They have been building Western type helicopters for at least thirty years now and are not dependent on Russian copies.
 

ABNredleg

Old-Salt
The major stumbling block for them is their certification process. No major airline will buy their aircraft unless it has an FAA (or the European equivalent) certificate of airworthiness so that is what they are currently expending a tremendous amount of effort on. The FAA has staff in China monitoring this project in an effort to "certify" the Chinese certification process. Once that is accomplished then the FAA will trust the airworthiness of any aircraft resulting from that process, and an airline can trust that a Chinese built aircraft was designed to Western standards of safety. This is a huge undertaking that will take many years but it will eventually happen.
 

offog

LE
Hmm. Whilst I would like to think so, I don't think you can for from 'Let's build one of the most complex modern machines on the planet' to ' Here we go' without expecting...erm...'unforeseen issues' later on.
I can't see western airlines clamouring to buy them any time soon until they have let other far east regional airlines beta test them first.
The Chinese internal market is very big, they are looking at about 60 737s for internal use.
 
The Chinese internal market is very big,
and it will get bigger, roughly twice as many people as the EU in only a marginally smaller area; lots of scope for expansion.
 

FHA

LE
It's an aerodynamic box with engines and control surfaces. All the knowledge needed to design one is open source.
What you're saying is that designing one isn't complex. It doesn't mean the machine itself isn't highly complex. It is.


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