China Flexing it's muscle

#2
Hmmm... They're getting a little uppity aren't they? Roll on WWIII. Perhaps Hilary 'Huge Cojones' Clinton can persuade Arab-ama to get the US involved from the start in a REAL war this time.
 
#3
Presumably this (in part) explains with three of the USN's Ohio boats (converted to carry lots of TLAM) recently surfaced in separate parts of the Pacific- all within reach of China...
 
#4
Why does everyone shit themselves whenever China's Armed forces are mentioned? The Russians in the Cold War were just as communist, more so infact.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
#5
Let's get out of Afghanistan and leave them to go doolally tap on China's border together with Pakistan, Burma, North Korea and those fine, upstanding Mongolian Nazis. Hopefully that will keep them busy with a bit of overstretch whilst the West rebuilds its economy.
 
#7
I couldn't be arrsed to read the whole article but one i think i got the jist of it and when i comes to China being smart and projecting friendship and influence around the globe to secure the rites to valuable minerals and materials they are way ahead of us, in my opinion. I travelled around Africa last year and Chinese companies were prominent everywhere i went, they were building schools and hospitals, housing for the poor and generally looking like the saviours of Africa and not the raping, cheating imperialist the west is seen as.
 
#8
They don't have a monopoly on rare earths 'coz those are available in plenty of other countries. They just happened to have been the cheapest supplier for a bit and if we got too dependent on them then that's our own greedy and shortsighted fault.

It's their resource to do with as they please, same as North Sea oil and gas is ours. Unless anyone's prepared to argue that the means of production should belong to all? No doubt that argument would appeal to some folk in Beijing...
 
#9
Just like the USSR all over again. Those old enough can cast their brain cell back to the late 60s and early 70s when Ivor and his mates were all over Africa like a dose of syph. I got briefed on who and who not to speak to when I visited the centre of the continent. It's just substituting one big ogre for another.
 
#10
They don't have a monopoly on rare earths 'coz those are available in plenty of other countries. They just happened to have been the cheapest supplier for a bit and if we got too dependent on them then that's our own greedy and shortsighted fault.

It's their resource to do with as they please, same as North Sea oil and gas is ours. Unless anyone's prepared to argue that the means of production should belong to all? No doubt that argument would appeal to some folk in Beijing...
Oh yes. it's their product to do with as they please.

BUT. It's damm close to a hostile act when you deliberately engage in practises that force certain industries to either relocate or go out of business. Since the US Armed Forces epitomise Modern High Tech warfare it must seem damm odd to the Pentagon that China is attempting to turn the whole of the South China Seas into their turf, have engaged in ASBM research and now are placing pressure on the High Tech industries that the US Forces depend upon
 
#12
Broadly speaking, I am fairly hopeful that the US and China can run the world together in a sensible fashion. If they can't, we are in big trouble,
Lovely.....getting it in the arrse from more superpowers for the next few decades.....Glad to see where Mr AEP stand's.
 
#15
Never mind. In forty years or so, all our grandkid's first language will be Mandirin Chinese, and none of this western progress and democracy and invention and medical advances will ever have happened. It will have all been done by Chinese scientists and doctors, and Einstein, Pasteur, Haber and Szilard will never have existed.

Try reading David Wingrove's "Chung Kuo" quintology. It was sold as science-fiction a while ago now, but I am pretty convinced that was only because the only prophecy books that could be sold were by Nostradamus.

BTW, once you know what "Chung Kuo" means, you will understand the Chinese mentality perfectly.

Tam
 
#17
Apologies for not replying earlier, but it’s getting into the silly season in university admissions.

BUT. It's damm close to a hostile act when you deliberately engage in practises that force certain industries to either relocate or go out of business.
That strikes me as quite the most astonishing proposition. Three things immediately sprang to mind:

1) What you’ve described is a standard feature of modern business. It’s happened countless times under our free-market system and is usually held up as an example of how vibrant and dynamic the system is. If you count the number of businesses around the world that went out of business as a direct result of our de-regulating our financial markets, that same argument implies we’ve already committed ‘hostile acts’ on most of our trading partners.

2) If we experience another hard winter and choose to use our oil and gas reserves to heat our own people’s homes and businesses and fuel our own industries rather than selling to our normal customers, does that constitute a ‘hostile act’ toward them or prudent use of our own resources to benefit ourselves? Are we under any obligation to keep renewing contracts just because we did in the past?

3) If deciding not to sell to someone something they deem essential to their economy or military industry constitutes a ‘hostile act’, how does that not justify countless wars of aggression on the grounds of ‘they made me do it!’?

Since the US Armed Forces epitomise Modern High Tech warfare it must seem damm odd to the Pentagon that China is attempting to turn the whole of the South China Seas into their turf, have engaged in ASBM research and now are placing pressure on the High Tech industries that the US Forces depend upon
The defense (sic) of the US is surely the prime concern of the US government and not that of the PRC. If they’ve created a military that's dependant entirely on the output of one source – regardless of the friendliness/hostility presumed of that source – I’d suggest that the US population have more to fear from the people running their military procurement than from another country.
 
#18
BTW, once you know what "Chung Kuo" means, you will understand the Chinese mentality perfectly.
Once you understand that 'Chung Kuo' is from the Wade-Giles system of Romanisation used by the late Qing and Republic and not from the Hanyu Pinyin system exclusively used in the PRC, you will understand Wingrove's grasp of modern China perfectly.

That's before you even ask the question, "Middle of what?"
 
#19
God I hope we have a Cold war II:The return of the red's........The last 20 year's have been pretty boring.
Smells like money to me! There is a slightly worrying parallel between the theory after the Great War (we don't need to keep a large army around, the Navy can watch the borders and if there's a war then we can avoid getting involved because there's no way that it would affect our key strategic interests, right?) and nowadays (we don't need to keep a large army around, the Navy can watch the borders and if there's a war then we can avoid getting involved because there's no way that it would affect our key strategic interests, right?)
 
#20
SE Asia is China's Back yard.
UK is no longer a World Power and after coming Defence Review will be a zero player on the International game.
Just give up the seat at the Top Table and let Japan have the worry and the problems.

john
 

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