China bad mmkay. We don't want Google to work on this mmmkay. Thanks, GOOG employees

#21
Internet memes from a decade ago. A grass mud horse is an internet rebel, river crabs are government security organs.
Almost, but your description leaves out the essence. Which is why I left it for those of worthy inclination to discover for themselves. Has it really been that long ago?

The terms are based on Mandarin homophones.
I do believe I pointed that out, in a harmonious way, when I mentioned don't screw up the tones and say càonǐmā, as it would be rude.

Bet ya didn't see that one you know you saw either.
 
#22
But Google claims to be 'different' - an ethical company that listens to the concerns of it's employees - so the good old British army 'Shut-up and face the front' shouldn't really apply
Google's motto back in 2000...
google.jpg


changed in 2015 with the creation of Alphabet...
newgoogle2015.png


As always their definitions are elastic.
 

MrBane

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#23
Google's motto back in 2000...
View attachment 364081

changed in 2015 with the creation of Alphabet...
View attachment 364082

As always their definitions are elastic.
'course they are. They're a multi-squillion dollar company with shareholders.

Just like any other company they have branding and that 'be good' is part of it.

Those hippies that joined them thinking it was a utopia need to be flung into the real work place to experience how business is actually done.

Having said that, I rate Microsoft as one of the best due to the Gates Foundation and how much wealth that man has spaffed on good causes. Google next, and if there was a hell for corporations, Apple would have a seat reserved.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#24
They do kind of have a point......or should they (for the sake of argument) keep shipping Zyknon B to the end user and shut-up because because that's what they're paid to do and it's no concern of the company/nation/employees what the end user chooses to do with it?

Remember the concept of 'illegal orders?' - "just obeying orders" didn't work in Nuremberg
Thats because the victors said so. I doubt any illegal orders existed in Uncle Joes Army!
 
#27
I think the problem is more that if the Google operates in China, the grass mud horse can squeeze it elsewhere...
A bigger problem is that if Google operates in China it has to be subject to Chinese law - which takes sovereignty extremely seriously and will not permit any organisation to challenge to it.

Google's entire business model is based on retaining capabilities which could challenge state sovereignty.
 
#28
They do kind of have a point......or should they (for the sake of argument) keep shipping Zyknon B to the end user and shut-up because because that's what they're paid to do and it's no concern of the company/nation/employees what the end user chooses to do with it?

Remember the concept of 'illegal orders?' - "just obeying orders" didn't work in Nuremberg
**** me, if there any thread that you cant shoe horn in a reference to the Nazis?

You utter belter.
 
#29
They're getting paid to do a job, not for their political views

If they don't like, don't work for Google

Just wish civil servants would do lookwise
They're (Google employees) also entitled to express their political views, especially in the US, with its 1st Amendment.
Civil Servants are a different matter entirely regarding politics & whilst free to say & think things at odds with the government, should do as instructed & to the best of their ability.
 
#30
True, and I must confess I don't like the idea of working against my personal principles. That said, if it bothered me that much I'd walk. It's difficult to do that I'll admit when you need the certainty of regular income and keeping roofs over heads and all that.
But isn't that what we were all urged to do by CMD, WRT the EU; work to change it from within?
Fat lot of good it did him.
 
#32
They're (Google employees) also entitled to express their political views, especially in the US, with its 1st Amendment.
Civil Servants are a different matter entirely regarding politics & whilst free to say & think things at odds with the government, should do as instructed & to the best of their ability.

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances"

The 1st Amendment doesn't apply to private companies.
 
#33
"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances"

The 1st Amendment doesn't apply to private companies.
Oddly enough, private companies are more likely to stand by the 1st than most of the others.
 
#35
A bigger problem is that if Google operates in China it has to be subject to Chinese law - which takes sovereignty extremely seriously and will not permit any organisation to challenge to it.

Google's entire business model is based on retaining capabilities which could challenge state sovereignty.
If you do business in China, you do it on their terms. And quite frankly, I suspect the Chinese would be delighted if Google stayed out of their domestic market for now. There are a handful of very large Chinese tech firms who are rivals to Google, Amazon, and Facebook, who have grown up in the local market and are now expanding outwards to the rest of the world. We may not see them much here in the West because they are focusing on fast growing markets elsewhere where established players do not have the market sewn up yet.

I have read in the tech industry publications that Google is afraid that if they stay out of the Chinese market they give those companies an unchallenged base of revenue which they can use to sustain a push for market share elsewhere in the world.

Here's a list of the world's biggest Internet tech companies. Note that nearly half of them are based in China. Yandex (Russia) just misses making the list. The rest are based in the US, and not a single one of them is based in either the EU or Japan. Google's corporate name is Alphabet in the list below.

The US sees China as their biggest rival for dominance in the fast growing technology sector, which is why they are spending so much time and effort arm twisting "allies" to stop doing business with them. Many of these markets tend towards monopoly, so it is a winner takes all economic war. These Chinese companies have technology and people which are as good as anyone else, and are world leaders in many fields. These aren't Shenzen manufacturers making cheap knock-offs.

Things look much the same from Google's corporate headquarters where they see Chinese companies established in a lot of markets that Google fancies for themselves. If they can't take the war to Baidu's and others home turf they can't monopolize the world market, and if they can't do that they expose a weakness to other rivals. So their move back into China is not just about returning to a market that they pulled out of, it's also a defensive measure as well.
China's home-grown tech giants are dominating their US competitors

 
#36
If you do business in China, you do it on their terms. And quite frankly, I suspect the Chinese would be delighted if Google stayed out of their domestic market for now. There are a handful of very large Chinese tech firms who are rivals to Google, Amazon, and Facebook, who have grown up in the local market and are now expanding outwards to the rest of the world. We may not see them much here in the West because they are focusing on fast growing markets elsewhere where established players do not have the market sewn up yet.

I have read in the tech industry publications that Google is afraid that if they stay out of the Chinese market they give those companies an unchallenged base of revenue which they can use to sustain a push for market share elsewhere in the world.

Here's a list of the world's biggest Internet tech companies. Note that nearly half of them are based in China. Yandex (Russia) just misses making the list. The rest are based in the US, and not a single one of them is based in either the EU or Japan. Google's corporate name is Alphabet in the list below.

The US sees China as their biggest rival for dominance in the fast growing technology sector, which is why they are spending so much time and effort arm twisting "allies" to stop doing business with them. Many of these markets tend towards monopoly, so it is a winner takes all economic war. These Chinese companies have technology and people which are as good as anyone else, and are world leaders in many fields. These aren't Shenzen manufacturers making cheap knock-offs.

Things look much the same from Google's corporate headquarters where they see Chinese companies established in a lot of markets that Google fancies for themselves. If they can't take the war to Baidu's and others home turf they can't monopolize the world market, and if they can't do that they expose a weakness to other rivals. So their move back into China is not just about returning to a market that they pulled out of, it's also a defensive measure as well.
China's home-grown tech giants are dominating their US competitors

Chinese internet censorship: soon coming to a site near you?

'Reddit is reportedly set to land a massive investment from a Chinese censorship powerhouse in order to keep the “Internet’s front page” rolling. Web-tech giant Tencent is expected to inject $210 million into the website as part of a Series D fundraising round, and depending on how much Reddit raises, the round is expected to push the company past a $3 billion valuation, according to TechCrunch.

'But the union between Tencent and Reddit is being challenged by a confused public, who are very much aware of the fact that Reddit is currently blocked in China, and has been for the past 90 days.
As part of China’s notorious censorship regime, the Great Firewall of China, Tencent’s impending investment in the Silicon Valley company and what sort of influence it will gain at Reddit still remains unclear.


'As one of the main architects of the Great Firewall of China, which blocks access to selected foreign websites restricting people from accessing online content, Tencent’s new western venture has raised questions regarding Reddit’s future as users are fearing their beloved social website will inevitably be censored. “It is representative of the strange bedfellows that the interaction of the US and Chinese technology systems creates,” said Adam Segal, a cybersecurity expert at the Council on Foreign Relations.'

China’s censored atrocities exposed
 
#37
#39
A. Piss poor 'journalism'
Or as we know it these days, journalism.

B. It appears that was the image posted on Reddit, to which the article is referring
They've chosen to embed it in their own story and given it a caption that it, "tells it's own story." Ironic.

C. They all look the same anyway ;)
At first glance, I saw a few that looked more Korean and that's what prompted a closer look. The clothing styles looked rather old, too - not a pair of jeans in sight.
 
#40
Why did news.com.au think to illustrate "China's atrocities" against Uighur with a photo of Japanese internees in the US during WW2?
The news.com.au link given in the previous post results in a 404 now. Searching for it using Google results in the link from there doing the same thing. It appears that News.com.au has decided to censor that news story for some reason. I find it very disturbing that Australia is censoring news.

Perhaps there should be a law against Australian news corporations investing in news or internet sites in other countries, as they may cause those otherwise peerless purveyors of only the most fair and balanced news to publish false information or withhold true news in order to favour and promote the interests of their powerful patrons.
 

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