China - and the dangerous drift to war in Asia

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Interesting think-piece in Saturday's The Times on the protests in Hong Kong by Roger Boyes:

Hong Kong faces being crushed in China's battle with the west

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meanwhile, I came across this.


Christophe Deloire, Reporters Without Borders

Beijing is succeeding in influencing the media world beyond its borders. The Communication University of China is working with Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Hindu nationalist government to open a “journalism university” in India. China spends a lot of money on inviting journalists from Africa, Latin America and the Asia-Pacific region to come to “develop their critical spirit” in Beijing. Economic pressure forces content providers all over the world to censor themselves in order to access the Chinese market. Even the Cambridge University Press almost got sucked in when it recently purged its China catalogue of around 100 articles that would offend Beijing. It backtracked after an outcry but other less prestigious publishers are not in position to do this.



China is stingy with the press visas it issues to foreign reporters but Xinhua plans to have opened 200 international bureaux by 2020. Xinhua is much appreciated by the world’s autocrats because of its policy of “non-interference” in the domestic policies of the countries it covers. Such leading international broadcast media as TV5, VOA and the BBC are unavailable in China outside of luxury hotels but the English, Spanish, French, Arabic and Russian-language broadcasts of China Global Television Network (the former CCTV) currently reach 85 million viewers in more than 100 countries.

1560932875500.png


Finally, China exports its censorship and surveillance tools. A Portuguese-language version of China’s leading search engine, Baidu, was launched in Brazil under the name of Busca. Content regarded by Beijing as “sensitive” was clearly blocked by Busca although, after protests, this censorship was apparently lifted. China is also trying to promote international adoption of its unencrypted instant messaging service, in which it can access all the data, including conversation detail. If the democracies do not resist, China will not only never be able to enjoy press freedom but will also gradually extend its own lid on free speech to the rest of the world. This is why it is important to change China before it changes us.

.......................... ........................ endit ...................................

Was thinking whether a new thread " China and the Media" was appropriate - but there seems to be a plethora of stuff in existence already, so this thread seemed best
 

Sixty

ADC
Moderator
Book Reviewer
@Grey Fox Take a little break from this thread for a bit.
 
More Chinese military activity in the South China Sea.

'Startling new satellite images show China has deployed at least four fighter jets to a highly contested island in the South China Sea. Taken above the skies of Woody Island on Wednesday, the images mark a major military development in the disputed region.

'China has never before placed its sophisticated J-10 fighter jets on Woody or any Chinese-controlled islands before — and the move comes as tensions in the region are on the rise. Earlier this month, a Filipino fishing boat was hit by a Chinese vessel in the body of water, after which China was criticised for aggressive actions. Analysts say the placement of fighter jets in the open is significant and shows they were on the contested island for up to 10 days.'


China’s brazen move in tense stand-off
 
It's reassuring to see Trump making some moves towards dealing with the Nork and Iranian powder kegs but, besides the trade thing he doesn't seem to be overtly dealing with the military bad behaviour China is throwing around, now they've stationed fighter jets on the "islands".
Surely this is more than a step too far?
 
It's reassuring to see Trump making some moves towards dealing with the Nork and Iranian powder kegs but, besides the trade thing he doesn't seem to be overtly dealing with the military bad behaviour China is throwing around, now they've stationed fighter jets on the "islands".
Surely this is more than a step too far?

I think that 'step' was taken some years ago, so everything now is a fait accompli.
 
I have no ties with Warwick university but do spend some time within it's bounds. I have been asked more than twice for my email address and Facebook page by "nice Chinese students". My first suspicion was ID fraud but recent events make me wonder if other subtle nefarious motives were at work.
 
I was foolish enough to call out a person I believed was a Chinese troll on another Forum. It seemed to me to be significant that within a short time my mail was hacked into and money stolen from a bank account through requests apparently made by me to my manager for transfers to an account in Shanghai.

I was given copies of these and they were uncannily accurate in form and style, and in two cases accompanied by a form with my signature.

A large amount was transferred and for a while lost. Eventually the bank did refund the money but it was a salutary lesson of the reach and consequence that might be possible.
 
I previously posted a related story on the North Korea thread, but as the Japan-South Korea dispute has drifted further from that connection I will continue with it here.
Original post from last Sunday: https://www.arrse.co.uk/community/threads/n-korean-nuclear-strike-could-cause-chaos-in-us.265770/post-9391270

New story: www.cbc.ca/news/world/tokyo-japan-south-korea-dispute-1.5217659?cmp=rss

In short, relations between Japan and South Korea are deteriorating over a court case in South Korea relating to compensation for the victims of the Japanese use of forced labour in the first half of the 20th century (1910 to 1945). The court has ruled that Japanese companies can be sued for their own involvement in this, and that their assets in South Korea can be seized to pay compensation to the victims.
The neighbouring countries are quarrelling over South Korean court decisions ordering Japanese companies to compensate victims of forced labour during Japan's 1910-1945 colonial rule of the Korean Peninsula.
Japan has not taken this very well and has imposed trade sanctions on South Korea, cutting off essential supplies of high tech materials going to some of the pillars of the South Korean economy such as Samsung and LG.
Seoul has protested Japan's tightened controls on sensitive high-tech exports to South Korea that could affect South Korean manufacturers as well as global supplies of smartphones and displays.
Things have deteriorated ever further lately with the Japanese getting increasingly agitated.
Foreign Minister Taro Kono said after summoning Ambassador Nam Gwan-pyo that Japan will "take necessary measures" against South Korea if interests of Japanese companies are harmed, without giving details.

Their talks were held in an icy atmosphere, briefly turning confrontational.

"It is extremely problematic that South Korea is one-sidedly leaving alone the situation that violates the international law, which is the foundation of our bilateral relationship," Kono told Nam. "The action being taken by the South Korean government is something that completely overturns the order of the international community since the end" of the Second World War.
The Japanese want the South Korean government to step in and make a political intervention overruling the independent judicial process in order to protect the assets of Japanese companies which are at risk.
Kono urged Seoul to immediately take action to stop the court process, under which the plaintiffs of the lawsuit are preparing to seize assets of the Japanese companies, including Mitsubishi Heavy Industry.
The Japanese are claiming that their trade sanctions against South Korea are unrelated to the current dispute, but have simply been imposed because the South Koreans are too untrustworthy to be allowed to have such sensitive materials (raw materials used to make computer and smart phone chips).
Tokyo said the export control issue has nothing to do with historical disputes but that the materials in question can be sent only to trustworthy trading partners. Without presenting specific examples, it has questioned Seoul's credibility in controlling the exports of arms and items that can be used for civilian and military purposes.
On Friday an elderly South Korean man set himself on fire in front of the Japanese embassy in Seoul in protest over the Japanese attitude towards South Korea.
In Seoul, a 78-year-old South Korean man died hours after setting himself ablaze near the Japanese Embassy on Friday, police said.

Police said the man had phoned an acquaintance earlier to say he planned to self-immolate to express his antipathy toward Japan.
The South Koreans want to get the UN Security Council involved over Japan's trade sanctions. There's no news yet on whether anyone outside the two is willing to get involved.
South Korea has proposed an inquiry by the UN Security Council or another international body on the export controls of both countries.
 
The Japan-South Korea spat is heating up as Japan has increased trade sanctions against South Korea. The South Koreans have responded by summoning the Japanese ambassador and threatened to withdrawn "friendly nation" status from Japan.
Japan's cabinet on Friday approved the removal of South Korea from a list of countries with preferential trade status, prompting retaliation from Seoul where a senior official summoned the Japanese ambassador and told him that South Koreans may no longer consider Japan a friendly nation.
As a reminder, the Japanese trade sanctions consist of restricting exports to South Korea of high tech materials essential to South Korea's key high tech semi-conductor industry. The dispute is centred around historic crimes committed by the Japanese against Koreans in the first half of the 20th century.
The decision expanding controls over exports of sensitive materials takes effect on Aug. 28. It follows an earlier requirement that Japanese exporters to South Korea be approved on a case-by-case basis for three materials used in semiconductors, smartphones and other high-tech devices — South Korea's key exports.
This will add further economic turmoil to a sector already rattled by increasing US tariffs against Chinese exports (a lot of Chinese electronics exports contain a high proportion of South Korean components).
In addition to escalating tensions between the Asian neighbours, the move will ripple across the high-tech sector, further affecting supply chains already rattled by U.S.-China trade tensions.
President Moon of South Korea said that South Korea would retaliate against the Japanese, and said that the Japanese measure was intended to "contain" South Korea's economic growth.
South Korea's President Moon Jae-in, before heading into an emergency cabinet meeting to discuss the Japanese measures, vowed stern countermeasures against Japan's planned downgrading of his country's trade status, calling it an attempt to contain South Korea's economic growth and harm global supply chains.
He also said that South Korea must "triumph over Japan" or else "history will repeat itself".
He said South Korea today is one of the world's top democracies and economic powers with the potential to fully overcome the difficulties. "However, if we succumb to challenges, history will repeat itself. If we take the current challenges as an opportunity instead and turn them into a chance to make a new economic leap, we can fully triumph over Japan. Our economy can surpass Japan's," he said.
Among the measures that South Korea is considering taking is not renewing a military intelligence sharing pact with Japan which comes up for renewal soon.
South Korean presidential office said Seoul will consider ending a military intelligence-sharing pact with Tokyo as part of countermeasures against Japan. The pact's renewal is coming up later this month.
 

Mike Barton

War Hero
Interesting think-piece in Saturday's The Times on the protests in Hong Kong by Roger Boyes:

Hong Kong faces being crushed in China's battle with the west

View attachment 399538
meanwhile, I came across this.


Christophe Deloire, Reporters Without Borders

Beijing is succeeding in influencing the media world beyond its borders. The Communication University of China is working with Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Hindu nationalist government to open a “journalism university” in India. China spends a lot of money on inviting journalists from Africa, Latin America and the Asia-Pacific region to come to “develop their critical spirit” in Beijing. Economic pressure forces content providers all over the world to censor themselves in order to access the Chinese market. Even the Cambridge University Press almost got sucked in when it recently purged its China catalogue of around 100 articles that would offend Beijing. It backtracked after an outcry but other less prestigious publishers are not in position to do this.



China is stingy with the press visas it issues to foreign reporters but Xinhua plans to have opened 200 international bureaux by 2020. Xinhua is much appreciated by the world’s autocrats because of its policy of “non-interference” in the domestic policies of the countries it covers. Such leading international broadcast media as TV5, VOA and the BBC are unavailable in China outside of luxury hotels but the English, Spanish, French, Arabic and Russian-language broadcasts of China Global Television Network (the former CCTV) currently reach 85 million viewers in more than 100 countries.

View attachment 399539

Finally, China exports its censorship and surveillance tools. A Portuguese-language version of China’s leading search engine, Baidu, was launched in Brazil under the name of Busca. Content regarded by Beijing as “sensitive” was clearly blocked by Busca although, after protests, this censorship was apparently lifted. China is also trying to promote international adoption of its unencrypted instant messaging service, in which it can access all the data, including conversation detail. If the democracies do not resist, China will not only never be able to enjoy press freedom but will also gradually extend its own lid on free speech to the rest of the world. This is why it is important to change China before it changes us.

.......................... ........................ endit ...................................


Was thinking whether a new thread " China and the Media" was appropriate - but there seems to be a plethora of stuff in existence already, so this thread seemed best
A propos of nothing in particular isn't it comforting that with all the great advances in weapons technology and the total transformation of Hong Kong since the 1960s, the Hong Kong police still use the solid old CS gas/baton round gun with their nicely turned wooden stocks left behind by the Brits but which haven't seen use in the UK in almost half a century?
 
The Japan-South Korea spat is heating up as Japan has increased trade sanctions against South Korea. The South Koreans have responded by summoning the Japanese ambassador and threatened to withdrawn "friendly nation" status from Japan.


As a reminder, the Japanese trade sanctions consist of restricting exports to South Korea of high tech materials essential to South Korea's key high tech semi-conductor industry. The dispute is centred around historic crimes committed by the Japanese against Koreans in the first half of the 20th century.


This will add further economic turmoil to a sector already rattled by increasing US tariffs against Chinese exports (a lot of Chinese electronics exports contain a high proportion of South Korean components).


President Moon of South Korea said that South Korea would retaliate against the Japanese, and said that the Japanese measure was intended to "contain" South Korea's economic growth.


He also said that South Korea must "triumph over Japan" or else "history will repeat itself".


Among the measures that South Korea is considering taking is not renewing a military intelligence sharing pact with Japan which comes up for renewal soon.
Can we for one bloody day not have one nation turning against the other? Christ! I just want some positive and happy news ffs.
 
I was foolish enough to call out a person I believed was a Chinese troll on another Forum. It seemed to me to be significant that within a short time my mail was hacked into and money stolen from a bank account through requests apparently made by me to my manager for transfers to an account in Shanghai.

I was given copies of these and they were uncannily accurate in form and style, and in two cases accompanied by a form with my signature.

A large amount was transferred and for a while lost. Eventually the bank did refund the money but it was a salutary lesson of the reach and consequence that might be possible.
I’m a relative nobody, but the Mrs with her position within the financial sector tell’s me tales of many similar goings on to yours. The simplistic solution to similar problems if doing international banking is to insist on passwords/code words to authenticate transactions. We do that along with keeping only the money required for the next fortnights payments in a current account and transfer in money through a couple of deposit accounts making it a complicated pipeline for anyone to deal with. Credit cards, as they are used more or less for direct debits in the US we have 3: 1. Day to day card; 2. Direct debit card ; 3. Spare card should one of the others get hacked.......which happens about 2 or 3 times a year.

Not the Chines, but the Mrs has been the target of soviets russians for the last couple of years with hardly a week going by without some Sov, or 3, trying to join her linked in network.
 
South Korea and Japan are at it again.
Japan has imposed trade sanctions on South Korea, but now South Korea has responded with some of their own directed against Japan.

South Korea groups foreign countries in two categories when it comes to restricting controlled exports to them. They have now created a third category in between in which there will be only one country - Japan.
South Korea currently divides its trade partners into two groups while managing the exports of sensitive materials that can be used both for civilian and military purposes. Seoul will create a new in-between bracket where it plans to place only Japan, which "in principle" will receive the same treatment as the non-favoured nations in what's now the second group, Sung said.
It's still not clear just what form South Korean retaliation against Japan will take. The new trade sanctions will be delayed in implementation until some time in September while the government gets public feedback on them.
Sung said the changes are expected to enter effect sometime in September, following a 20-day period for gathering public opinion on the issue and further regulatory and legislative reviews. He said Seoul is willing to accept any request by Tokyo for consultation over the issue during the opinion-gathering period.
 
South Korea and Japan are at it again.
Japan has imposed trade sanctions on South Korea, but now South Korea has responded with some of their own directed against Japan.

South Korea groups foreign countries in two categories when it comes to restricting controlled exports to them. They have now created a third category in between in which there will be only one country - Japan.


It's still not clear just what form South Korean retaliation against Japan will take. The new trade sanctions will be delayed in implementation until some time in September while the government gets public feedback on them.
Divide and conquer (or at least dominate). We make it so easy for our adversaries.
 

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