China - and the dangerous drift to war in Asia

 
And you know better than the Chinese scientist that wrote "The Unnatural Origin of SARS and New Species of Man-Made Viruses as Genetic Bioweapons"
I know that a) that article wasn't written at or by an employee of the Wuhan facility, b) that it discussed the possible use of bioweapons against China and c) the PLA aren't morons and have plenty of biomedical research labs under their direct control which don't have foreigners crawling all over them at regular intervals from partner institutions overseas.

So yes, don't be an idiot.
 
You're an idiot. let me give you some examples of how people can do some research by just reading.

Example, you want to learn a new language - French for example. Do you need to move to France and interact with French people? or can you just sit at home (on your toilet or wherever), download an app for your phone such as Babbel, Duolingo etc and learn from that?

The point is that you can easily learn stuff via reading/listening to others without needing to get off your arse, something which seems to be beyond your level of understanding. The fact that I and many others didn't visit China and the Wuhan labs to do our own research, doesn't mean we can't read or listen the research of others then correlate all that information and think for ourselves.
You have consistently proven, across numerous subjects, that you are one of the less intelligent people on Arrse with your links to crackpot theories and outright nonsense. It is a very, very, long time since anyone whose IQ stretches into treble figures has taken you seriously.
 
Meanwhile, ROC is hedging its bets by getting the Japanes government to support a new semiconductor plant in Japan.
According to the article the proposed chip factory is a joint venture between TSMC, Sony, and Denso, the latter being a major automotive parts manufacturer. The Japanese government will also be kicking in some unspecified amount of money.

TSMC are the world leaders in chip making technology and everybody around the world who uses chips wants to be their partner. Sony are a major user of chips, and much of the auto industry (including I imagine Denso) is currently shut down due to a global chip shortage (the big auto makers cancelled all their orders during the pandemic and are now astonished to discover they have no chips).

Chip factories require huge capital investments and companies such as TSMC (the world's biggest chip maker) are limited by how much capital they can raise on their own. The result is that they rely on getting capital from partners or from governments. For example, GlobalFoundaries, a rival to TSMC (and the company who make most of AMD's chips) are owned by the government of the UAE. They started off as AMD's manufacturing arm but got sold off when AMD could no longer afford the investments required to keep up with advances in technology and investment.

I'm not aware of any recent major investments in chip manufacturing plants that didn't have major government investment. The handful of big companies that dominate the industry let it be known that they intend to build a plant somewhere in the world and then let governments bid on who is going to give them the biggest handout to build it in their country. The US recently announced they would offer $50 billion in subsidies for companies to set up shop there. The EU recently announced their own plans, and while there aren't any solid figures attached to it yet industry sources are saying a number of around €20 billion in subsidies is about what will be needed to achieve the stated objective.

The pandemic was a huge shock to the ideology of free markets when countries who had vaccine plants shut off exports to countries who didn't have them. Now every country who has the capability to do so is setting up sovereign vaccine production on their own soil using government funds so they don't have to rely on anyone else.

I'm not sure if you have been following the automotive news recently, but as I mentioned above large chunks of the global auto industry are shut down due to shortages of chips. The shortage has been caused by a combination of things such as pandemic shutdowns, the auto industry cancelling their orders, wobbly electric generating infrastructure in Texas that falls over in bad weather, the pandemic driven demand for kit that will allow people to "work from home", and a fire in Japan at a major plant.

Governments around the world, having developed a taste for government action in terms of procuring PPE and vaccines, are now turning their attention to what they see as another commanding height of industry, which is chip manufacturing. If you are a technology leader such as TSMC then you can pretty much name your own price in terms of subsidies in return for setting up a plant in countries which have the money to pay for one.
 
I know that a) that article wasn't written at or by an employee of the Wuhan facility, b) that it discussed the possible use of bioweapons against China and c) the PLA aren't morons and have plenty of biomedical research labs under their direct control which don't have foreigners crawling all over them at regular intervals from partner institutions overseas.

So yes, don't be an idiot.

So you've not read it, don't be an idiot
 

Jacl

War Hero
let me give you some examples of how people can do some research by just reading.

Example, you want to learn a new language - French for example. Do you need to move to France and interact with French people? or can you just sit at home (on your toilet or wherever), download an app for your phone such as Babbel, Duolingo etc and learn from that?
Learning a new language can be done at home or in a language school to a limited extent, but the final polish always comes in the country where the language is spoken. That's my experience with German, Dutch and French. It is possible to reach a high standard in a foreign language at home, but it is very hard work.
 
The Chinese are directly responsible for a pandemic that has killed millions worldwide, and caused massive economic damage to every Western nation. Not a single sanction has been levied against the PRC, because politicians are too cowardly and big business is too greedy.
However regarding sanctions some very interesting circumstances have emerged when the CCP decided to economically 'punish' Australia for having the temerity for demanding an enquiry into the role the CCP has played in the COVID crisis. A pandemic that has killed so many and so economically devastated the globe and peoples lives.

In it's 'Wolf Warrior' diplomacy it applied massive sanctions to a huge swath of Australian goods that are exported to China, this intended to demonstrate to the 'Piece of gum stuck to the bottom of China's shoe!!' how insignificant they were to China. This has actually turned out to be a huge unintended sore to that Chinese foot. China has both shot itself in the foot, and put its foot into its mouth.

Australia has turned to new markets, gained global stature for confronting China, is beefing up its defences, is getting nuclear submarines, has joined AUKUS and general strengthened the alliance that is keeping the S China sea free of CCP's attempts to establish a major choke hold on major maritime sea routes.

China loses out on every on of those gains, is now finding that perhaps it needed Australian imports more that it had previously thought, and in the meantime seriously pissed off the Aussies who are not likely to easily forget the arrogant treatment it received from a long time trade 'partner'.

 
An interesting bit of speculation.

'China’s next war might not start in the South China Sea or be set off by squabbling between superpowers over the status of Taiwan.

'It may have nothing to do with contested lands or international influence. Rather it could be over something far more mundane but nonetheless vital. A high altitude clash could break out over water – or the increasing lack of it due to climate change. And it could create a series of “failed states”, warns a report on future climate conflicts.

'Admiral Barrie is now an executive member of the Australian Security Leaders Climate Group (ASLCG), a body that includes former high ranking members of the ADF and Department of Defence.

'Research by the group has looked at a possible conflict high in the Himalayas between India and China over water access. That flash point would be centred on the vast Hindu Kush Himalayan and Tibetan Plateau regions – often known as the “third pole” due to their vast ice sheets. Here glaciers are the starting point for some of the region’s most important rivers. Waterways such as the Yangtze and Yellow rivers that flow into China; the Ganges, Brahmaputra and Indus rivers into India as well as the Irrawaddy to Myanmar and the Mekong which exits into the sea in Vietnam.

'China is particularly dependent on the glaciers which are also known as the Great Himalayan Watershed. Twenty per cent of the world’s population is in China but it has only 6 per cent of its potable water. And what water China has is often a long way from where much of its population lives. Already dams dot the high mountains to both capture the water and use it to create electricity. None of this need lead to conflict if there’s enough water for everyone. But there are fears climate change has changed all that.

'A report in 2019 stated that the Himalayan ice sheet has reduced significantly, taking its stores of water with it. The Himalayan glaciers were receding “very homogeneously and accelerating their retreat,” Joerg Schaefer, a climate scientist at Columbia University told the US ABC News.'


 
This seems like as good a place as any for the the following. This is an interview by a Canadian television network with someone who studies China. She discusses the increasing influence of China in the world without falling off her chair and chewing the carpet such as seems to be common these days.

It's a very good interview and I can recommend watching it.

 
Learning a new language can be done at home or in a language school to a limited extent, but the final polish always comes in the country where the language is spoken. That's my experience with German, Dutch and French. It is possible to reach a high standard in a foreign language at home, but it is very hard work.
Harry Flashman had the best method of learning a foreign language. He would always select a local filly as a mistress and learn the language between the sheets.
 
It's a very good interview and I can recommend watching it.
It was certainly interesting, certainly in the context of the present situation in the West, where we have a massive doubting of our history, a situation where huge sections of society are so filled with anxiety about even the fact of which sex/gender identity they are.

Here we have a massive section of the earths population recovering from decades of humiliation and determined to 'regain' their rightful place.

There is however the thorny question of whether' individual' human rights comes before 'National interest'.
As the young lady who is reporting from Canada herself admitted -'privileged' position in Canada and quite succinctly outlined the situation facing us all.

Empire rise...and fall. China is a world power on the rise and is determined to be a supreme power.

Question is some Empires have not all been benign towards the individual, China's is openly not.

Which one do you hope will be the one who controls every facet of your life?
 
(...) Empire rise...and fall. China is a world power on the rise and is determined to be a supreme power.

Question is some Empires have not all been benign towards the individual, China's is openly not.

Which one do you hope will be the one who controls every facet of your life?
I don't want any foreign powers to control my life. Fortunately for me that is also national policy for Canada. Hence the support for international institutions which can dilute the influence of the great powers, the efforts to diversity trade away from the current largest economies, the controls over foreign investment (brought in during the 1960s), the use of the EU and now post-Brexit Britain as a counterbalance to the largest powers, etc.

It's almost as if my country has been thinking about these sorts of problems since the break up of the British Empire has meant we have had to find other ways of countering foreign domination, whether "friendly" or not, on our own. Imagine that.
 
China loses out on every on of those gains, is now finding that perhaps it needed Australian imports more that it had previously thought, and in the meantime seriously pissed off the Aussies who are not likely to easily forget the arrogant treatment it received from a long time trade 'partner'.
Nah, our current LNP government would apologise to China then give them their own grandparents if they thought they could start getting Chinese money again.

The rest of the plebs will hopefully be voting these morons out at next years elections.
 
I don't want any foreign powers to control my life. Fortunately for me that is also national policy for Canada. Hence the support for international institutions which can dilute the influence of the great powers, the efforts to diversity trade away from the current largest economies, the controls over foreign investment (brought in during the 1960s), the use of the EU and now post-Brexit Britain as a counterbalance to the largest powers, etc.

It's almost as if my country has been thinking about these sorts of problems since the break up of the British Empire has meant we have had to find other ways of countering foreign domination, whether "friendly" or not, on our own. Imagine that.
Well, they do. The principles of Self determinism (America) and Marxist Socialist anti imperialism (Russia) thinly disguised as principles affect all of us. The EU /EC was designed to prevent war in Europe, unfortunately we gave France a head start. And here’s the paradox for me, Paris the city of Lurve and romance and fashion, is a scheming hotbed depending on everyone to be fixated on her whilst she get’s her own imperial way.
 

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