Children’s Sopwith Camel build.

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Ravers, when you inevitably build your own 'grownup' version with a go-kart engine for dogfighting while shouting "dakkadakkadakka!" and ambushing the pheasants, is there any scope for using a paintball gun as the main armament?

The big ammunition hopper could probably be disguised as the drum in a Lewis gun. Now I think of it, this has definite potential for stag dos.
Don't joke.....the Chinese Police in Hong Kong have already adapted paint-guns for use with pepper spray/teargas apparently
 
You didn’t nick a real one for me did you?

Just a thought, if you haven’t started it yet and it’s not too much trouble, any chance we could add an extra 5-10cm to the overall diameter? So 65-70cm diameter, 40cm deep and 40cm diameter hole.

No worries if not. Just looking at pics I reckon my feed bin is a bit puny. It’s currently 55 x 35 x 35.
So there I was this morning having stolen half an hour before doing some proper work with a piece of ally having a bit of a swear as the dimensions were a bit tight for the compound curve so the unfinished Mk1 will be binned in favour of the larger Mk2 version which I will have a go at later!
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
'In place of' than 'additional to'.

And as far as changing ammunition drums, with the 2F.1's typical armament of a single overwing Lewis (in addition to the single deck-mounted Vickers), it could be dropped down through the centre-wing cutout, either to change magazines or to fire at high-flying zeppelins.



Most overwing Lewis guns were on Foster rail mounts, so could be slid back to facilitate magazine changes.

The real father of Airborne Forces, Louis Strange knew how to change mags on the Lewis.

While with No. 6 Squadron during the Great War, Strange was a compatriot of Captain Lanoe Hawker.
The squadron became pioneers of many aspects in military aviation at the time, driven largely by the imagination of Strange and the engineering talents of Hawker. Their talents led to various mountings for Lewis machine guns, one of which won Hawker his VC, and one that nearly cost Strange his life.
Having equipped his Martinsyde S1 scout with a Lewis gun mounted on the top wing above the cockpit, on 10 May 1915 Strange sought out the enemy to try out the new arrangement and attacked a German Aviatik two-seater.

In order to change the empty drum on the Lewis, Strange had to stand up in the cockpit.
Immediately the machine flipped on its back, throwing Strange from the cockpit and developing a flat spin downwards.
Strange, hanging onto the ammunition drum of the Lewis gun, managed to swing back into the cockpit and kick the stick over to right the aircraft only 500 feet above the ground.
He later related:

"I kept on kicking upwards behind me until at last I got one foot and then the other hooked inside the cockpit. Somehow I got the stick between my legs again, and jammed on full aileron and elevator; I do not know exactly what happened then, but the trick was done. The machine came over the right way up, and I fell off the top plane and into my seat with a bump."

This violent manoeuvre caused him to land in his seat so hard that he flattened it. He now lay on his back on the floor of the aircraft, facing the rear, with his legs sticking out of the cockpit. Somehow he managed to turn himself around and fly back to his base, sitting on the floor, unable to see over the edge of the cockpit and without a single functional instrument to guide him.

He safely returned to base, but was reprimanded by his CO for "causing unnecessary damage" to his instrument panel and seat in his efforts to regain the cockpit !
The squadron's log book simply noted: "the squadron was fortunate in its personnel."

After the war Strange read an article in a German newspaper in which two airmen described seeing a British pilot fall out of his plane and hang on to the machine gun. Strange tracked them down, and the three former enemies confirmed that these were indeed the Germans who’d witnessed the Martinsyde flipping over.

The Germans told Strange that as they watched him go down, struggling and kicking, they hadn’t the heart to shoot at him. They were relieved he’d survived the war, because the sight of him hanging helplessly from his Lewis gun had haunted them for years.


Edited for spellnig.
 
Last edited:
The real father of Airborne Forces, Louis Strange knew how to change mags on the Lewis.

While with No. 6 Squadron during the Great War, Strange was a compatriot of Captain Lanoe Hawker.
The squadron became pioneers of many aspects in military aviation at the time, driven largely by the imagination of Strange and the engineering talents of Hawker. Their talents led to various mountings for Lewis machine guns, one of which won Hawker the Victoria Cross, and one that nearly cost Strange his life.
Having equipped his Martinsyde S.1scout with a Lewis gun mounted on the top wing above the cockpit, on 10 May 1915 Strange sought out the enemy to try out the new arrangement and attacked a German Aviatik two-seater.

In order to change the empty drum on the Lewis, Strange had to stand up in the cockpit.
Immediately the machine flipped on its back, throwing Strange from the cockpit and developing a flat spin downwards.
Strange, hanging onto the ammunition drum of the Lewis gun, managed to swing back into the cockpit and kick the stick over to right the aircraft only 500 feet above the ground.
He later related:

"I kept on kicking upwards behind me until at last I got one foot and then the other hooked inside the cockpit. Somehow I got the stick between my legs again, and jammed on full aileron and elevator; I do not know exactly what happened then, but the trick was done. The machine came over the right way up, and I fell off the top plane and into my seat with a bump."

This violent maneuver caused him to land in his seat so hard that he flattened it. He now lay on his back on the floor of the aircraft, facing the rear, with his legs sticking out of the cockpit. Somehow he managed to turn himself around and fly back to his base, sitting on the floor, unable to see over the edge of the cockpit and without a single functional instrument to guide him.

He safely returned to base, but was reprimanded by his CO for "causing unnecessary damage" to his instrument panel and seat in his efforts to regain the cockpit !
The squadron's log book simply noted: "the squadron was fortunate in its personnel."







His commanding officer reprimanded him for destroying the instrument panel and seat of the Martinsyde. Nobody believed Strange’s story.

After the war Strange read an article in a German newspaper in which two airmen described seeing a British pilot fall out of his plane and hang on to the machine gun. Strange tracked them down, and the three former enemies confirmed that these were indeed the Germans who’d witnessed the Martinsyde flipping over.

The Germans told Strange that as they watched him go down, struggling and kicking, they didn’t have the heart to shoot at him. They were relieved he’d survived the war, because the sight of him hanging helplessly from his Lewis gun had haunted them for years.
Strewth (as Biggles might say), that's one hell of a tale.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Strewth (as Biggles might say), that's one hell of a tale.
In the book I read it mentioned that the mag was jammed on and Strange's movements while attempting to remove it for the change were what caused the inversion. After having soundly cursed the mag for not releasing he was now hanging onto it for dear life and praying it stay in place.
Sometimes you get lucky.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
The real father of Airborne Forces, Louis Strange knew how to change mags on the Lewis.

While with No. 6 Squadron during the Great War, Strange was a compatriot of Captain Lanoe Hawker.
The squadron became pioneers of many aspects in military aviation at the time, driven largely by the imagination of Strange and the engineering talents of Hawker. Their talents led to various mountings for Lewis machine guns, one of which won Hawker his VC, and one that nearly cost Strange his life.
Having equipped his Martinsyde S1 scout with a Lewis gun mounted on the top wing above the cockpit, on 10 May 1915 Strange sought out the enemy to try out the new arrangement and attacked a German Aviatik two-seater.

In order to change the empty drum on the Lewis, Strange had to stand up in the cockpit.
Immediately the machine flipped on its back, throwing Strange from the cockpit and developing a flat spin downwards.
Strange, hanging onto the ammunition drum of the Lewis gun, managed to swing back into the cockpit and kick the stick over to right the aircraft only 500 feet above the ground.
He later related:

"I kept on kicking upwards behind me until at last I got one foot and then the other hooked inside the cockpit. Somehow I got the stick between my legs again, and jammed on full aileron and elevator; I do not know exactly what happened then, but the trick was done. The machine came over the right way up, and I fell off the top plane and into my seat with a bump."

This violent manoeuvre caused him to land in his seat so hard that he flattened it. He now lay on his back on the floor of the aircraft, facing the rear, with his legs sticking out of the cockpit. Somehow he managed to turn himself around and fly back to his base, sitting on the floor, unable to see over the edge of the cockpit and without a single functional instrument to guide him.

He safely returned to base, but was reprimanded by his CO for "causing unnecessary damage" to his instrument panel and seat in his efforts to regain the cockpit !
The squadron's log book simply noted: "the squadron was fortunate in its personnel."

After the war Strange read an article in a German newspaper in which two airmen described seeing a British pilot fall out of his plane and hang on to the machine gun. Strange tracked them down, and the three former enemies confirmed that these were indeed the Germans who’d witnessed the Martinsyde flipping over.

The Germans told Strange that as they watched him go down, struggling and kicking, they hadn’t the heart to shoot at him. They were relieved he’d survived the war, because the sight of him hanging helplessly from his Lewis gun had haunted them for years.


Edited for spellnig.
The 23 Sqn briefing room at Waddington was named ‘The Strange Room’; always a point of discussion for visitors! :)

When the Sqn disbanded, 8 Sqn moved in and it’s now named ‘The West Room’ after Freddie West VC.

Regards,
MM
 
The real father of Airborne Forces, Louis Strange knew how to change mags on the Lewis.

While with No. 6 Squadron during the Great War, Strange was a compatriot of Captain Lanoe Hawker.
The squadron became pioneers of many aspects in military aviation at the time, driven largely by the imagination of Strange and the engineering talents of Hawker. Their talents led to various mountings for Lewis machine guns, one of which won Hawker his VC, and one that nearly cost Strange his life.
Having equipped his Martinsyde S1 scout with a Lewis gun mounted on the top wing above the cockpit, on 10 May 1915 Strange sought out the enemy to try out the new arrangement and attacked a German Aviatik two-seater.

In order to change the empty drum on the Lewis, Strange had to stand up in the cockpit.
Immediately the machine flipped on its back, throwing Strange from the cockpit and developing a flat spin downwards.
Strange, hanging onto the ammunition drum of the Lewis gun, managed to swing back into the cockpit and kick the stick over to right the aircraft only 500 feet above the ground.
He later related:

"I kept on kicking upwards behind me until at last I got one foot and then the other hooked inside the cockpit. Somehow I got the stick between my legs again, and jammed on full aileron and elevator; I do not know exactly what happened then, but the trick was done. The machine came over the right way up, and I fell off the top plane and into my seat with a bump."

This violent manoeuvre caused him to land in his seat so hard that he flattened it. He now lay on his back on the floor of the aircraft, facing the rear, with his legs sticking out of the cockpit. Somehow he managed to turn himself around and fly back to his base, sitting on the floor, unable to see over the edge of the cockpit and without a single functional instrument to guide him.

He safely returned to base, but was reprimanded by his CO for "causing unnecessary damage" to his instrument panel and seat in his efforts to regain the cockpit !
The squadron's log book simply noted: "the squadron was fortunate in its personnel."

After the war Strange read an article in a German newspaper in which two airmen described seeing a British pilot fall out of his plane and hang on to the machine gun. Strange tracked them down, and the three former enemies confirmed that these were indeed the Germans who’d witnessed the Martinsyde flipping over.

The Germans told Strange that as they watched him go down, struggling and kicking, they hadn’t the heart to shoot at him. They were relieved he’d survived the war, because the sight of him hanging helplessly from his Lewis gun had haunted them for years.


Edited for spellnig.
Reads a lot similar to the average air-experience flight I conducted as a staff cadet/junior instructor at 625 Gliding School at South Cerney in the mid-70s ...
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
The 23 Sqn briefing room at Waddington was named ‘The Strange Room’; always a point of discussion for visitors! :)

When the Sqn disbanded, 8 Sqn moved in and it’s now named ‘The West Room’ after Freddie West VC.
The Fred West Room...

RAF...

Right...
 
Another 20 mins blagged this morning - front shape done to the new @Ravers dimensions. Normally I would roll up the cylinder and TIG the two bits together but this will be rivetted. I will have to make the sleeve out of a couple of strips because I dont have 2m of suitable ally in the cut-off bin. Oh and I will cut the opening in the front so that the magnificent babies head tin radial engine can be properly admired!
20190620_084511_HDR.jpg
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Another 20 mins blagged this morning - front shape done to the new @Ravers dimensions. Normally I would roll up the cylinder and TIG the two bits together but this will be rivetted. I will have to make the sleeve out of a couple of strips because I dont have 2m of suitable ally in the cut-off bin. Oh and I will cut the opening in the front so that the magnificent babies head tin radial engine can be properly admired! View attachment 399747
That is absolutely phenomenal!
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
@Bacongrills pressure gauges arrived today. Absolutely perfect. Cheers again. I’ll print out some different faces for them so we have an airspeed, altimeter and RPM.

Just playing around with the dash layout now. Still need a few switches and maybe a spirit level. Obviously I’ll polish everything up nicely and varnish the ply.

I also have an old Cyma WW2 pocket watch that I was saving for his 18th, but I reckon he needs it now. I’ll put a hook on the dash so it can be easily removed when not in “flight”.

It was a bit of a faff getting everything in. I’d made the cockpit way too cramped so had to shift the backrest right back and cut away some of the support that I was planning to mount the gun on.

Also had to move the position of the yoke and throttle.

7A15E74A-943B-4BCE-A89D-B537B7BD3B70.jpeg
 
I also have an old Cyma WW2 pocket watch that I was saving for his 18th, but I reckon he needs it now. I’ll put a hook on the dash so it can be easily removed when not in “flight”.



View attachment 399847
Can't find a picture of the mounting, but personal chronometers (aka pocket watches) were used in WWI cockpits. They were slid into the open top of a U-shaped bracket, and could be removed after use.
 
Last edited:

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Found these online.

I’ll print them off, laminate them and stick them on the dash somewhere.

3D66257A-2318-4F78-A57D-8744B155DD85.jpeg
F6BED0BF-2DA9-4696-A3CB-C64133B3C857.jpeg
A72FF743-095D-4ACB-A235-0747CB89286B.jpeg
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
I’m sort of following this as a rough pattern. It won’t be an exact replica, but close ish.

A couple of toggle switches in the bottom left corner and a spirit level at the top should complete the look nicely.

D6C5936F-F48D-42CF-99CB-80432DB86D70.jpeg
 
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