Children’s Sopwith Camel build.

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Warning !

There's a bloke on the farm next door building a Fokker , he's calling himself "The Red Darren " , he's going around Penrith saying he's going to **** you out of the sky, he's wearing a Pickelhaube made out of a coal scuttle with a doorknob on the top, and was last seen in B&Q trying to build an MG08 from plumbing fittings.
Mother Fokker.
 
As cool as that would be, I’m almost 99% certain that one of the kids would end up decapitating the other.
Pah! The men of the Royal Flying Corps would joke that the Camel offered a choice between, “a wooden cross, the Red Cross or a Victoria Cross” .
Kids of today...
 
Yup, firing from the stick, there's a good graphic of the interrupter here:
Very interesting, thanks. Definitely a better idea than armouring the propeller blades and hoping for the best.
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Flying a Camel is not particularly easy. Having flown gliders and a little powered, the Camel is unstable because of:

Massive gyroscopic effect of the rotary engine
Weight all within 5 feet (engine, pilot, fuel)
CofG too far aft (worse with a full tank of fuel)

This may be of interest:
Test flying The Shuttleworth Collection’s Sopwith Camel F.1 | The Vintage Aviation Echo

PS: have you seen a white & black beagle hanging around?

View attachment 398975
I mentioned earlier on the thread that I read somewhere that Camels were shit at turning right because of the engine torque. To turn right it was usually easier to do a full 270 degree left turn. Imagine having to keep that in mind during a dogfight.

It might have to have a subtle little cartoon Snoopy on it somewhere. The missus is obsessed with him.
 
I mentioned earlier on the thread that I read somewhere that Camels were shit at turning right because of the engine torque. To turn right it was usually easier to do a full 270 degree left turn. Imagine having to keep that in mind during a dogfight.

It might have to have a subtle little cartoon Snoopy on it somewhere. The missus is obsessed with him.
Correct other than reverse direction.
Pilots used to turn 270° right to turn left as it was faster.
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Saw the film about taking the Bristol to Gallipoli, bloody marvelous!!

@Ravers, as much as I think this is a brilliant project for your kids, but does seem to getting a life of its own and getting a tad over complicated! Especially with the adults(?) on here :eek:
Go big or go home as they say.

To be honest this is all a learning experience for the sprogs as much as getting a big model plane at the end of it.

Every little intricacy we add is another job learned, another tool mastered etc.

It’s either this or sit indoors playing Minecraft.
 

Auld-Yin

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Time for this
 
I mentioned earlier on the thread that I read somewhere that Camels were shit at turning right because of the engine torque. To turn right it was usually easier to do a full 270 degree left turn. Imagine having to keep that in mind during a dogfight.

It might have to have a subtle little cartoon Snoopy on it somewhere. The missus is obsessed with him.

A blast from the past, although accuracy not a priority.


 
Flying a Camel is not particularly easy. Having flown gliders and a little powered, the Camel is unstable because of:

Massive gyroscopic effect of the rotary engine
Weight all within 5 feet (engine, pilot, fuel)
CofG too far aft (worse with a full tank of fuel)

This may be of interest:
Test flying The Shuttleworth Collection’s Sopwith Camel F.1 | The Vintage Aviation Echo

PS: have you seen a white & black beagle hanging around?

View attachment 398975
Its well know that pilots trying to steer them really got the hump.
 
the pilot's seat of the time was a wicker seat, so nip down to the local antique shop or big box retail furniture store, get same , cut legs off and fit inside....
 
" mummy, daddy is hogging the play plane again "

" come away kids, daddy's not well "
Mummy, why is Daddy sat in the toy plane and shouting, "Dakkadakkadakkadakka, take that Dobbin you ****"?
 
All this technical talk is all well and good, but if young master Ravers is going to the village show, he needs a decent rack for his flying suit. At the very least a row of ribbons. The DFC is a very fetching purple and white diagonal stripe.
Is Mrs Ravers any good with a sewing machine?
 

Auld-Yin

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All this technical talk is all well and good, but if young master Ravers is going to the village show, he needs a decent rack for his flying suit. At the very least a row of ribbons. The DFC is a very fetching purple and white diagonal stripe.
Is Mrs Ravers any good with a sewing machine?
 
Wrong time of the year to be asking this I know, but since you are taking it to the village show, can you do a tie in with a local school? Teaching history perhaps? Are there any local connections with World War One flying? Ex WW1/WW2 airfields?
 
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