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Chieftain MBT - "Smokin'"

#41
Was not the turret floor attached to the turret, so that if you tried climbing through it would be no better than climbing out? Asked a CVR(T) man with only vague memories of a couple of visits inside a Chieftain turret.
Indeed, so it would have been a very bad idea to try and get from drivers compartment into the turret while the latter was turning.
 
#42
Indeed it did, a 4.2 6 cylinder which often blew seals. When it ran boy it was good, sadly in Recce Pln of about 8 only 2 were ever fully serviceable.
My neighbour in RAF Laarbruch had an old Jag, can't remember which model, but it needed an engine. Now it just so happened that the Rocks were equipped with Foxes and my neighbour was pally with someone in MTSS. After a short while his Jag was back on the road, until his wife wrote it off while trying to ram a tree.
 
#44
Derived from the engine that went into the XK120 sports car and the early E-types.
XK120
XK140
XK150
C Type
D Type
E Type
XJ6 Series 1,2 & 3
MK VII
MK VIII
MK IX
Mk X/ 420G
Mark 1
Mark 2
S Type
All the Damiler variants including the DS420 produced up until 1992

The the CVR's and CVT's and even some specialist suff like Dennis fire engines.

Built from 1948 to 1992. Won Le Mans 5 times as well as amultitude of other races
Fantastic engine and capable of pretty good performance even by todays standards
 
#45
My neighbour in RAF Laarbruch had an old Jag, can't remember which model, but it needed an engine. Now it just so happened that the Rocks were equipped with Foxes and my neighbour was pally with someone in MTSS. After a short while his Jag was back on the road, until his wife wrote it off while trying to ram a tree.
Trying to or actually ramming a tree?
 
#46
the engine and gearbox were separate units and fv 434 or any other hiab cranes could lift them - from memory i think the 2 hr's is probably correct to swap either on them in/out
If the replacement pack was on site, we could do an FV433 Abbot pack change in under an hour. Different configuration of pack and no need to disconnect the cables before lifting. Most standard 430 series had a mounting bolt left out permanently because of how difficult it was to reach. Once had a runaway pack whilst it was out, jumping about like Michael Flatly on steroids.
 
#47
XK120
XK140
XK150
C Type
D Type
E Type
XJ6 Series 1,2 & 3
MK VII
MK VIII
MK IX
Mk X/ 420G
Mark 1
Mark 2
S Type
All the Damiler variants including the DS420 produced up until 1992

The the CVR's and CVT's and even some specialist suff like Dennis fire engines.

Built from 1948 to 1992. Won Le Mans 5 times as well as amultitude of other races
Fantastic engine and capable of pretty good performance even by todays standards
When it runs.
 
#48
i'm afraid i need to disagree with you mate - there were plenty of diesel or petrol engines available or technically feasible at the time, after all every other country with heavy tanks were already using them!(eg Meteor on Cent or the Russian 500HP V2 diesels or yank cadillacs) - the killer was the 'multi-fuel' requirement placed on chieftain. also, having cut my teeth on chieftain as reme and then carried out literally hundreds of pack lifts on a very wide variety of British army eqpt over the next 25 years or so including yank stuff like MLRS and M578 no-one does a packlift on a slope! irrespective of a drop down backdoor type arrangement - just consider what happens when you take the strain and it will swing or how hard it would be to align the new one on a tilt!!
Well..

The Meteor was a modified Merlin and was a petrol engine.. there was a deliberate intention to move to diesel in the late 60s as soon as the logistic changes could be made. The "multi fuel" idea was, I agree a stupid, moon on a stick requirement, however there was no suitable UK diesel truck engine at the time. The Patton had a Continental AV1790, not a Cadillac, which was a petrol engine at the time, although a turbo diesel version was produced later. Are you seriously suggesting a UK tank used a Soviet engine in the 60s... I said that no suitable engine was in production at the time.. not that they did not exist!

I cannot comment on the pack change issue, however I know there was much disquiet at the choice of the top entry pack chamber at the time. and the decision not to combine the power pack with the final drive..
 
#49
I can still remember such stacking of jerry cans in Arsbeck, that was 76-78. Always wondered what that was for, as the RAF got all its fuel via railway tankers, loads of them.
Not actually true.. most of the RAF fuel was delivered to airfields via CEPS the central european pipeline system, which was built just after the war. Quite a lot of land fuel came from CEPS as well via jerrycan filling points.
 
#50
Not actually true.. most of the RAF fuel was delivered to airfields via CEPS the central european pipeline system, which was built just after the war. Quite a lot of land fuel came from CEPS as well via jerrycan filling points.
Wildenrath and Brüggen both had rail links to the Bundesbahn network. According to the stackers this was part of the fuel supply system. I can't remember if Laarbruch and Gütersloh had such an arrangement.
 
#51
While on the subject of smoking, oily monsters I have a question. Was it the FV 432 that leaked loads of oil, much to the non amusement of the German authorities?
 
#52
IIRC the last L60 before we had the V12 and Chally was the 'Belzona' (?) which again IIRC was actually not bad, note I didn't say good. We only blew one of those up ....
 
#53
Wildenrath and Brüggen both had rail links to the Bundesbahn network. According to the stackers this was part of the fuel supply system. I can't remember if Laarbruch and Gütersloh had such an arrangement.
All the clutch were on CEPS.. but they were also rail served! Always have a second sting to a loggie bow!

Can't remember if Gutersloh was, but CEPS certainly went up into the Corps rear area..
 
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#54
Wildenrath and Brüggen both had rail links to the Bundesbahn network. According to the stackers this was part of the fuel supply system. I can't remember if Laarbruch and Gütersloh had such an arrangement.
Gutersloh's AVTAG was delivered by rail from Braunschweig. AVTUR and AVGAS were delivered by road. There was an off-base tank farm at Niehorst which was linked to Gutersloh by a pipeline, however it was initially a one-way only pipeline. ie Niehorst to Gutersloh. Niehorst was filled by road tanker - the fuel was turned over every few months which meant a 24 hour operation for three or four days.

During 71/72, the pipework/pumps were updated which meant that Niehorst could be filled from the Gutersloh railhead which had a second spur installed at the same time. A cross-airfield pipeline was also laid which meant that BFI 6 (near Battle Flight) could be filled directly from Niehorst.

Gutersloh wasn't on the CEPS when I was there - don't know if it was connected after I left.
 
#55
XK120
XK140
XK150
C Type
D Type
E Type
XJ6 Series 1,2 & 3
MK VII
MK VIII
MK IX
Mk X/ 420G
Mark 1
Mark 2
S Type
All the Damiler variants including the DS420 produced up until 1992

The the CVR's and CVT's and even some specialist suff like Dennis fire engines.

Built from 1948 to 1992. Won Le Mans 5 times as well as amultitude of other races
Fantastic engine and capable of pretty good performance even by todays standards
Warwick County Fire Brigade had them in their trucks and had no end of overheating and blow ups. After extensive investigation the problem was found to be... overheating. No end of cooling system upgrades cured it, the cause was down to the truck fitting did not have the direct airflow over the block that was present in the car installations.
 
#56
AVTAG is nasty horrible stuff with all the bad points of diesel and petrol combined.

I should mention at this point that fuel safety is a big part of my day job.

AVTAG is a 50:50 Kero / Petrol blend with a low flashpoint (-18C). Bl**dy awful stuff thankfully not seen these days (at least I've not come across it in the past 10+ years).

Thankfully almost everything on the estate is now diesel which has a flashpoint of +56C and is a damn sight safer to store and handle!
 
#57
AVTAG is nasty horrible stuff with all the bad points of diesel and petrol combined.

I should mention at this point that fuel safety is a big part of my day job.

AVTAG is a 50:50 Kero / Petrol blend with a low flashpoint (-18C). Bl**dy awful stuff thankfully not seen these days (at least I've not come across it in the past 10+ years).

Thankfully almost everything on the estate is now diesel which has a flashpoint of +56C and is a damn sight safer to store and handle!
Was AVTAG not used by Phantooms.. ?
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#58
The XK120 engine was designed for 5star petrol. The J60 ran on CombatGas. Ate plugs and points. When I asked Tiffy why this was allowed, he replied that things came out of different budgets. One set of number crunchers didn't care if another pot had to pay out.
 
#59
Was AVTAG not used by Phantooms.. ?
AVTAG (aka JP4) was the aviation fuel of choice in NATO at the time. It was used by all RAFG jet-powered aircraft - it would have been a bit naughty putting it in the piston-engined types - and was a very good starter fuel for station bonfires. So, the answer to your question is 'Yes'.
 
#60
Not actually true.. most of the RAF fuel was delivered to airfields via CEPS the central european pipeline system, which was built just after the war. Quite a lot of land fuel came from CEPS as well via jerrycan filling points.
Hence why there was obscure military installations dotted around Germany containing nothing but filled Jerricans which those of us in 5 Ord Bn would have the dubious honour of sometimes removing and replenishing periodically! Not talking 100's or even 1000's....try 100's of thousands!!
 

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