Chieftain accidents

Truxx

LE
I was researching OPRA earlier when I came across this on Wiki

We may have a contender for the title THAT tank:

"An Australian Army Mk 3 Centurion Type K, Army Registration Number 169041, was involved in a small nuclear test at Emu Field in Australia in 1953 as part of Operation Totem1. Built as number 39/190 at the Royal Ordnance Factory, Barnbow in 1951 it was assigned the British Army number 06 BA 16 and supplied to the Australian Commonwealth Government under Contract 2843 in 1952.[83]

It was placed less than 500 yards (460 m) from the 9.1 kt blast with its turret facing the epicentre, left with the engine running and a full ammunition load.[84] Examination after detonation found that it had been pushed away from the blast point by about 5 feet (1.5 m), pushed slightly left and that its engine had stopped working, but only because it had run out of fuel. Antennae were missing, lights and periscopes were heavily sandblasted, the cloth mantlet cover was incinerated, and the armoured side plates had been blown off and carried up to 200 yards (180 m) from the tank.[83] It could still be driven from the site. Had the tank been manned, the crew would most likely have been killed by the shock wave.

169041, subsequently nicknamed The Atomic Tank, was used in the Vietnam War. In May 1969, during a firefight, 169041 (call sign 24C) was hit by a rocket-propelled grenade (RPG). The turret crew were all wounded by fragmentation as the RPG hollow charge jet entered the lower left side of the fighting compartment, travelled diagonally across the floor and lodged in the rear right corner. Trooper Carter was evacuated, while the others remained on duty and the tank remained battleworthy.[84]

The Atomic Tank is now located at Robertson Barracks in Palmerston, Northern Territory. Although other tanks were subjected to nuclear tests, 169041 is the only one known to have withstood a blast and to have gone on for another 23 years of service, including 15 months on operational deployment in a war zone.[85]"
 
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I was researching OPRA earlier when I c am across this on Wiki

We may have a contender for the title THAT tank:

"An Australian Army Mk 3 Centurion Type K, Army Registration Number 169041, was involved in a small nuclear test at Emu Field in Australia in 1953 as part of Operation Totem1. Built as number 39/190 at the Royal Ordnance Factory, Barnbow in 1951 it was assigned the British Army number 06 BA 16 and supplied to the Australian Commonwealth Government under Contract 2843 in 1952.[83]

It was placed less than 500 yards (460 m) from the 9.1 kt blast with its turret facing the epicentre, left with the engine running and a full ammunition load.[84] Examination after detonation found that it had been pushed away from the blast point by about 5 feet (1.5 m), pushed slightly left and that its engine had stopped working, but only because it had run out of fuel. Antennae were missing, lights and periscopes were heavily sandblasted, the cloth mantlet cover was incinerated, and the armoured side plates had been blown off and carried up to 200 yards (180 m) from the tank.[83] It could still be driven from the site. Had the tank been manned, the crew would most likely have been killed by the shock wave.

169041, subsequently nicknamed The Atomic Tank, was used in the Vietnam War. In May 1969, during a firefight, 169041 (call sign 24C) was hit by a rocket-propelled grenade (RPG). The turret crew were all wounded by fragmentation as the RPG hollow charge jet entered the lower left side of the fighting compartment, travelled diagonally across the floor and lodged in the rear right corner. Trooper Carter was evacuated, while the others remained on duty and the tank remained battleworthy.[84]

The Atomic Tank is now located at Robertson Barracks in Palmerston, Northern Territory. Although other tanks were subjected to nuclear tests, 169041 is the only one known to have withstood a blast and to have gone on for another 23 years of service, including 15 months on operational deployment in a war zone.[85]"
Incredible. Thanks.
 
Nearest thing to that I know of was in 1982 when I was with the RA Sales Team in Larkhill and Vickers brought over a main battle tank that was competing against Challenger 1 in a big equipment demo in training for Floater '83. Someone disobeyed orders and attempted to drive it off the low loader and managed to roll it so it landed tracks up. Sadly all photos were confiscated and the only thing hurt was the driver's pride.
 
Nearest thing to that I know of was in 1982 when I was with the RA Sales Team in Larkhill and Vickers brought over a main battle tank that was competing against Challenger 1 in a big equipment demo in training for Floater '83. Someone disobeyed orders and attempted to drive it off the low loader and managed to roll it so it landed tracks up. Sadly all photos were confiscated and the only thing hurt was the driver's pride.
I was on the RAC Sales Team on Floater '83.
 

Truxx

LE
I was a radar tech with the RA Sales Team - spent most of my time doing range safety officer for the Light Gun team when I wasn't flying around on jollies. Were you there for the rollover?
Similar thing with DROPS. The MVEE boffins insisted on larger wheels (ground pressure) Under sufferance Scammell fitted bigger wheels. First outing was at chertsey in front of the big knobs. A neat figure of 8 was going really well right up till the brand spanking answer to a problem no- one had decided it was time to have a lie down.

The production mmlc came with the original sized wheels.
 
Nearest thing to that I know of was in 1982 when I was with the RA Sales Team in Larkhill and Vickers brought over a main battle tank that was competing against Challenger 1 in a big equipment demo in training for Floater '83. Someone disobeyed orders and attempted to drive it off the low loader and managed to roll it so it landed tracks up. Sadly all photos were confiscated and the only thing hurt was the driver's pride.
Vickers MBT Mk 3 presumably?
 
Vickers MBT Mk 3 presumably?
Surely the Vickers Valiant. That was their then-new export model - up against the Giat AMX32 and the OTO Melara OF40 for overseas sales.
I managed to drive all three as pre-production prototypes and wrote them up in Autocar-style test reports in IDR 1981/82.
 
Surely the Vickers Valiant. That was their then-new export model - up against the Giat AMX32 and the OTO Melara OF40 for overseas sales.
I managed to drive all three as pre-production prototypes and wrote them up in Autocar-style test reports in IDR 1981/82.
Without wishing to start going through archives, a quick over view of your opinion of the three would be nice please.
 

Plenty Chiefys bombing around in this and they all seem to be going - Lionheart.

Never seen this one before and it’s worth a watch - lots of armour, that rifle in abundance and we used to have an army then. It’s enough to make you weep. Anyone on it? Seems like a lifetime ago........
I just experienced the most overwhelming wave of nostalgia.
That was an Army!
 
Without wishing to start going through archives, a quick over view of your opinion of the three would be nice please.
Allow me to quote my concluding paras in the article comparing the Valiant and AMX32, published December 1981.
“Bothe the Valiant and the AMX32 have been designed solely for the export market which is, more often than not, less exigent than the home market as long as the vehicle is capable of fulfilling the primary role for which it is intended.
This is not to say that these vehicles are in any way ‘thrown together’. On the contrary, many years of research have been spent in formulating a basic design which can be readily and easily modified to suit a potential customer’s requirements.
“In my view, both tanks are a generation behind the heavier West German and US tanks [NB I had conducted a similar exercise with the M1 and Leo 2, published in the same edition of IDR: the MoD wouldn’t
even let me look at Challenger 1] certainly in terms of electronics and crew protection.
“This, however, is a function of the market they are being aimed at, which does not need the bigger and costlier vehicles ...
“The Valiant and AMX32 do, though, have a great deal to commend them in their ease of operation and maintenance, and their lesser requirement for support.
“The market is open, especially in the Middle East where they could be facing Soviet T-72s or even each other.
“How they would survive is a matter for conjecture, but with well trained crews they could certainly put up a good fight.”

I don’t have the OF40 article to hand but, from memory, it was a bit more ‘cheap and cheerful’ - I didn’t feel quite as comfortable operating it as I had the others.
 
Nearest thing to that I know of was in 1982 when I was with the RA Sales Team in Larkhill and Vickers brought over a main battle tank that was competing against Challenger 1 in a big equipment demo in training for Floater '83. Someone disobeyed orders and attempted to drive it off the low loader and managed to roll it so it landed tracks up. Sadly all photos were confiscated and the only thing hurt was the driver's pride.
I test drove the first Vickers Valiant (VV 001) in mid-1981 and wrote up the report in IDR 12/1981.
Part of my report on the driver’s position may explain how the accident occurred.
The cab had only a single periscope and the driver had to lean forward over the bike-type control handlebars to see through the sight.
“... This sight gives a narrow field of view forward of the vehicle with lateral vision only available if the driver moves his head to the ends of the sight.
“At one point, when driving closed down, the author was lucky to bring the vehicle to a halt just before a [sheer] drop ...
“The drop was on the right, forward quarter of the tank and was not visible through the driver’s sight as the vehicle was turning to the left.”
 
Looks like like the love child of a Merkava and a Chally.
I've never heard of it, what happened to it?
The Valiant (Vickers Mk4 MBT with the Universal Turret - designed to take either the L7 105mm rifled, the L11 120mm rifled, or the Rheinmetall 120mm smoothbore main armament) wasn’t commercially successful.
The design then morphed into the Mk7, essentially the Valiant Universal Turret on a Krauss Maffei Leopard 2 hull.
Then, just after Vickers had completed Operation Dreadnought, the construction of a brand new manufacturing plant on the Scottswood Road in Newcastle (replacing the somewhat Stygian original facility), the government privatised ROF and sold ROF Leeds to Vickers, complete with the rights to Challenger production.
Vickers then had to prove to the government that Challenger was THE solution for the RAC.
 
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