Chieftain accidents

ugly

LE
Moderator
We saw a fire power from one on Hohne Ranges, just using its Vulcan. We all thought Oooh! Glad he's on our side!!!! (well supposedly)!
Apparently the sovs has the answer and it’s been on this forum about a brixmis team making sound recordings of it firing

Edited to add bumbletown brother might have regaled the tail pre brexit days
 
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NSP

LE
As the A10 dropped into the valley and levelled off, I could see the backs of the crew helmets. Impressed.
Pedantic point of order: A-10 singular ergo helmet, not helmets.
 
Soltau, late 80's. The Troop had been in a tac hide all night and during the morning we had heard some A-10's buzzing around here and there. Finally mid-morning, we descrimmed and set out from the hide onto the track to meet up with the rest of the Sqn. As we pulled out of the wood line and and straightened up, the driver immediately said "Feck me FC, elevate and look what's coming . . "

I elevated, and this is a made-up image of what faced me through the gun sight. . . .

View attachment 435994

They has probably been sat there awaiting for us to come out and be 'hit'

Very sobering
That’s the view I got on final approach into Detmold in a 15m wide glider... except for the trees...Their understanding of ‘Restricted Airspace’ is about on par with their concept of ‘Friendly Forces’.
 

BopBopBop

War Hero
Huh. Young'uns. Don't know a Stuka when you see one!
I grew up in Swindon from the late 1950's.

The sky was always filled with aircraft from RAF Brize, Lynham, Fairford, Wroughton and others.
Hunters at low level, Hastings, Beverley, Argosy, Britannia, Viscount? Comet, VC10, then Hercules some in pairs and at very low level.
Bloke up the road used to fly over in his yellow Tiger Moth.
A B36 once but it took me about 20 years to discover what it was as my aircraft and tank recognition skill was based on what was in the Airfix catalog.

Saw Concord, wheels down on its maiden flight into Fairford. Dad took us to Fairford to watch it take off. We stood at the end of the runway as it passed over us. The air was crackling. I think I nearly died from the overloaded sensations of noise and vibration.
Saw Concord land at Filton for its final flight.
But alas no Stukas.

I wanted to be a pilot until in dawned on me how much maths was involved so I settled on Chieftain.

48 years ago today I passed out from Catterick aged 17 and ⅓. Chieftain loader, 120mm, .50 ranging gun, GPMG and radio operator.
I was gobsmacked to be awarded Best Crewman. I must have still been in learn mode from school.

edit..
Add Belfast to the list.
 
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Soltau, late 80's. The Troop had been in a tac hide all night and during the morning we had heard some A-10's buzzing around here and there. Finally mid-morning, we descrimmed and set out from the hide onto the track to meet up with the rest of the Sqn. As we pulled out of the wood line and and straightened up, the driver immediately said "Feck me FC, elevate and look what's coming . . "

I elevated, and this is a made-up image of what faced me through the gun sight. . . .

View attachment 435994

They has probably been sat there awaiting for us to come out and be 'hit'

Very sobering

Well it wouldn't have been the first Blue-on-Blue that those fcukers are guilty of!
 

Bushrider

Old-Salt
Early to mid eighties, my troop of CVRs on one of the exercises for training officers we heard on the radio for everyone to stop, no movement. Later as dawn was breaking we heard that a chieftain had rolled just north of Imber village. Apparently new driver turned on one of the steep hills and rolled down ending up on its turret, several killed.

Several pages ago there was a picture of a chieftain at Wolfenbuttel sidings, never in my time there, where there chieftains only CVRs
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Early to mid eighties, my troop of CVRs on one of the exercises for training officers we heard on the radio for everyone to stop, no movement. Later as dawn was breaking we heard that a chieftain had rolled just north of Imber village. Apparently new driver turned on one of the steep hills and rolled down ending up on its turret, several killed.

Several pages ago there was a picture of a chieftain at Wolfenbuttel sidings, never in my time there, where there chieftains only CVRs
I remember Wolfenbüttel being exceedingly sharp and if 3 Shock Army went on their day trip to the Channel, Sixteen Syph 16/5L were purely a tripwire, with a life expectancy of minutes.
 

BopBopBop

War Hero
Early to mid eighties, my troop of CVRs on one of the exercises for training officers we heard on the radio for everyone to stop, no movement. Later as dawn was breaking we heard that a chieftain had rolled just north of Imber village. Apparently new driver turned on one of the steep hills and rolled down ending up on its turret, several killed.

Several pages ago there was a picture of a chieftain at Wolfenbuttel sidings, never in my time there, where there chieftains only CVRs
From the Guardian 12 July 2001 and other sources.

Two soldiers were killed and two injured when a tank overturned during army exercises on Salisbury Plain.
The soldiers were inside a 62 tonne Challenger 2 battle tank that toppled over into a steep cutting near the village of Imber, Wiltshire.

Geoff Todd, sector manager for Wiltshire ambulance, said: "We received a call from the military at 8.49 this morning.

One of the soldiers, all of whom were based at the nearby Tidworth barracks, was trapped in the vehicle for more than an hour.

A Ministry of Defence spokesman said: "It appears the tank was the only vehicle involved in the accident. It is believed to have overturned, we do not know why". A military accident team is investigating the cause.

It took almost three hours to right the tank. The two bodies were taken to the mortuary at Salisbury district hospital, where postmortem examinations were carried out.

The soldiers were part of A squadron of the 1st Royal Tank Regiment, and were preparing troops for a training exercise in Canada. A spokesman for the army said: "The two soldiers were not going to Canada themselves, but were acting as supervisors during a training exercise to prepare other troops for the trip."

The regiment is based at RAF Honington in Suffolk, although the A squadron has its home at Warminster in Wiltshire.

RIP. Lieutenant Paul Syred, 25, and Corporal Michael Paterson, 28, from A Squadron, 1 Royal Tank Regiment, based at Warminster, Wiltshire, died when the tank slipped off a track.

Another incident.
In 1997, a soldier was crushed to death as he repaired the main gun on a Chieftain battle tank while on exercises on Salisbury Plain.

Another incident
Imber friendly fire incident took place on 13 April 1942 at Imber in the English county of Wiltshire during the Second World War. One of the Royal Air Force fighter aircraft taking part in a firepower demonstration accidentally opened fire on a crowd of spectators, killing 25 and wounding 71. Pilot error and bad weather were blamed for the incident.

More
Twenty-five military personnel were killed when a Hurricane fighter pilot fired on spectators during a tactical demo on 13 April 1942 in Imber.

The pilot had mistaken them for dummies in poor visibility.
The tactical air demonstration of fire power in 1942 took place on Imber Downs with a squadron of six Hurricane aircraft.
The pilot of the sixth plane to pass over the area mistook spectators for a row of dummy soldiers placed on the ground and opened fire.

Twenty-five officers were killed and 71 injured.
RIP

Who needs A10's when we had Hurricane for ground attack.
 
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oldnotbold

War Hero
Not an MBT but i remember an NUOTC cadet was decapitated by the Turret on a Fox at Otterburn about '83
Happened more than once, sadly with the RAC Troop losing a YO in November in 1980 when a Fox came off road on the Friday evening drive up to Redesdale Camp. Notoriously top heavy vehicles - part of the reason fro the death was he was an infanteer who'd accepted a ride, whereas the core members of the RAC troop knew to get down inside if driving across a gradient. Another ex-NUOTC mate was killed when guiding an SPG back into its garage.
 
Several pages ago there was a picture of a chieftain at Wolfenbuttel sidings, never in my time there, where there chieftains only CVRs
We weren't based there. We were from Hohne, and were using the railyard to embark/disembark from Bergen sidings
 
Soltau, late 80's. The Troop had been in a tac hide all night and during the morning we had heard some A-10's buzzing around here and there. Finally mid-morning, we descrimmed and set out from the hide onto the track to meet up with the rest of the Sqn. As we pulled out of the wood line and and straightened up, the driver immediately said "Feck me FC, elevate and look what's coming . . "

I elevated, and this is a made-up image of what faced me through the gun sight. . . .

View attachment 435994

They has probably been sat there awaiting for us to come out and be 'hit'

Very sobering
The Devils crosses, I had a similar view one day while driving the jeep to one of the AA's at Fort Hood back in 84. Heard a noise, looked behind me and almost went off the trail. They came in at what seemed to be 100 feet. I could smell the exhaust
 
The Devils crosses, I had a similar view one day while driving the jeep to one of the AA's at Fort Hood back in 84. Heard a noise, looked behind me and almost went off the trail. They came in at what seemed to be 100 feet. I could smell the exhaust
Tom Clancy walt.
 
From the Guardian 12 July 2001 and other sources.

Two soldiers were killed and two injured when a tank overturned during army exercises on Salisbury Plain.
The soldiers were inside a 62 tonne Challenger 2 battle tank that toppled over into a steep cutting near the village of Imber, Wiltshire.

Geoff Todd, sector manager for Wiltshire ambulance, said: "We received a call from the military at 8.49 this morning.

One of the soldiers, all of whom were based at the nearby Tidworth barracks, was trapped in the vehicle for more than an hour.

A Ministry of Defence spokesman said: "It appears the tank was the only vehicle involved in the accident. It is believed to have overturned, we do not know why". A military accident team is investigating the cause.

It took almost three hours to right the tank. The two bodies were taken to the mortuary at Salisbury district hospital, where postmortem examinations were carried out.

The soldiers were part of A squadron of the 1st Royal Tank Regiment, and were preparing troops for a training exercise in Canada. A spokesman for the army said: "The two soldiers were not going to Canada themselves, but were acting as supervisors during a training exercise to prepare other troops for the trip."

The regiment is based at RAF Honington in Suffolk, although the A squadron has its home at Warminster in Wiltshire.

RIP. Lieutenant Paul Syred, 25, and Corporal Michael Paterson, 28, from A Squadron, 1 Royal Tank Regiment, based at Warminster, Wiltshire, died when the tank slipped off a track.

Another incident.
In 1997, a soldier was crushed to death as he repaired the main gun on a Chieftain battle tank while on exercises on Salisbury Plain.

Another incident
Imber friendly fire incident took place on 13 April 1942 at Imber in the English county of Wiltshire during the Second World War. One of the Royal Air Force fighter aircraft taking part in a firepower demonstration accidentally opened fire on a crowd of spectators, killing 25 and wounding 71. Pilot error and bad weather were blamed for the incident.

More
Twenty-five military personnel were killed when a Hurricane fighter pilot fired on spectators during a tactical demo on 13 April 1942 in Imber.

The pilot had mistaken them for dummies in poor visibility.
The tactical air demonstration of fire power in 1942 took place on Imber Downs with a squadron of six Hurricane aircraft.
The pilot of the sixth plane to pass over the area mistook spectators for a row of dummy soldiers placed on the ground and opened fire.

Twenty-five officers were killed and 71 injured.
RIP

Who needs A10's when we had Hurricane for ground attack.
I'm told the pilot subsequently committed suicide.
 

TamH70

MIA
I'm told the pilot subsequently committed suicide.
Apparently not. Wikipedia said in their webpage on the incident that the pilot was shot down in operations over France, more specifically while taking part in a night operation in his Hurricane - to which I would add **** that for a game of soldiers - as that sounds to me to be altogether too dangerous. Rhubarb raids were bad enough in the daytime, thankyewverymuch.

I also found the webpage from the CWGC saying where he was buried:



I'm not sure how he was kept on in flying status after a Court of Inquiry had found that he had screwed up that badly, but that's for his bosses at the time to answer.
 

BopBopBop

War Hero
Apparently not. Wikipedia said in their webpage on the incident that the pilot was shot down in operations over France, more specifically while taking part in a night operation in his Hurricane - to which I would add **** that for a game of soldiers - as that sounds to me to be altogether too dangerous. Rhubarb raids were bad enough in the daytime, thankyewverymuch.

I'm not sure how he was kept on in flying status after a Court of Inquiry had found that he had screwed up that badly, but that's for his bosses at the time to answer.
They probably needed every pilot they had in those days.

edit..
And he did a pretty good job with his ground attack.
The poor sod.
 
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Happened more than once, sadly with the RAC Troop losing a YO in November in 1980 when a Fox came off road on the Friday evening drive up to Redesdale Camp. Notoriously top heavy vehicles - part of the reason fro the death was he was an infanteer who'd accepted a ride, whereas the core members of the RAC troop knew to get down inside if driving across a gradient. Another ex-NUOTC mate was killed when guiding an SPG back into its garage.
That's the one I was thinking of mate. I'd only been in the TA for about 5 months when it happened. We had a 4 tonne TCV roll on the road to Otterburn not long after, no fatalities but a few injuries. My Section commander was out of action for a fair few months and a nice scar across his forehead as a souvenir.
Edit. I could be wrong but I'm sure we were opfor for the OTC that time
 

NSP

LE
Apparently not. Wikipedia said in their webpage on the incident that the pilot was shot down in operations over France, more specifically while taking part in a night operation in his Hurricane - to which I would add **** that for a game of soldiers - as that sounds to me to be altogether too dangerous. Rhubarb raids were bad enough in the daytime, thankyewverymuch.

I also found the webpage from the CWGC saying where he was buried:



I'm not sure how he was kept on in flying status after a Court of Inquiry had found that he had screwed up that badly, but that's for his bosses at the time to answer.
1942? Middle of a particularly nasty weltkrieg? Still a threat of invasion (we didn't scale back defences against seaborne landings until 1944)? Trained pilot? Experienced and tested at holding back Goering's supermen? German air raids still coming over?

I think there may have been a weighing up of expediencies that decided keeping him in the fight was better than being another pilot down with a serviceable fighter sitting in the dispersal waiting for someone to pass out of training to fly it - freshly-hatched and lacking experience.

Speaking as a layman, of course...
 

WALT

War Hero
Who needs A10's when we had Hurricane for ground attack.
*Ahem* from the Wiki link above:-

"Despite the statement from the coroner McLachlan was an American who had joined the Royal Canadian Air Force and officially a "Canadian""

Not that I wish to be seen reinforcing stereotypes, oh no.
 
1942? Middle of a particularly nasty weltkrieg? Still a threat of invasion (we didn't scale back defences against seaborne landings until 1944)? Trained pilot? Experienced and tested at holding back Goering's supermen? German air raids still coming over?

I think there may have been a weighing up of expediencies that decided keeping him in the fight was better than being another pilot down with a serviceable fighter sitting in the dispersal waiting for someone to pass out of training to fly it - freshly-hatched and lacking experience.

Speaking as a layman, of course...
The blokes we’re made of stern stuff back then, but I bet he had a few Sleepless nights in the short time he had left.
I can’t imagine what he went through mentally.
 

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