Chieftain accidents

Must have been about 1997 we took our children to visit Caldey Island off Tenby. Way in, the ferry landed at the jetty. Way out, the tide had changed. We all climbed into the back of a Stalwart which swam us out to the ferry and crossdecked.
Must have been sold off complete to CES then!
 
Must have been about 1997 we took our children to visit Caldey Island off Tenby. Way in, the ferry landed at the jetty. Way out, the tide had changed. We all climbed into the back of a Stalwart which swam us out to the ferry and crossdecked.
I envy you the experience. I swam a CET in Bovington once. It only had 6” of freeboard when swimming, so only the hatches and vision blocks were above water. Interesting experience!
 
We got our first pictures of T72 (or was it T64? T72) acquired by a very brave Brixmis crew. We learned these new tanks and how they differed from T54, T55 and T62.

But all these pictures were collected in a silver birch wood in East Germany. We became as good at identifying silver birch as T64/72.

Picture comes up, guy at front shouts T72, guy at back shouts silver birch. To this day, I see silver birch, I inwardly shout T72.
That’s never a willow!

Or...

 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
I envy you the experience. I swam a CET in Bovington once. It only had 6” of freeboard when swimming, so only the hatches and vision blocks were above water. Interesting experience!
76-7, after Omagh, fit in an UNFICYP tour, balance of 18 months to convert from Chieftain (of which I sadly never had the pleasure) to CVR(T). After the UNFICYP tour I was volunteered to be Squadron Leader's driver. One day the squadron disappeared from Tidworth up the road to Ludgershall, where there was a tank swimming basin.

"Trooper Alien, get in and I'll command you across the basin." It floated perfectly functionally, but it was clearly a Socialist Scorpion because it really really wanted to turn left. I could see nothing beyond the screen, but when the steep side of the basin appeared, it was quite unnerving.

Looking back I can't remember many/ any times in the next five years when I was out of our camp and driving a Scorpion. Samaritan, Sultan, Spartan a few times, but not the Scorpion I trained on.
 
76-7, after Omagh, fit in an UNFICYP tour, balance of 18 months to convert from Chieftain (of which I sadly never had the pleasure) to CVR(T). After the UNFICYP tour I was volunteered to be Squadron Leader's driver. One day the squadron disappeared from Tidworth up the road to Ludgershall, where there was a tank swimming basin.

"Trooper Alien, get in and I'll command you across the basin." It floated perfectly functionally, but it was clearly a Socialist Scorpion because it really really wanted to turn left. I could see nothing beyond the screen, but when the steep side of the basin appeared, it was quite unnerving.

Looking back I can't remember many/ any times in the next five years when I was out of our camp and driving a Scorpion. Samaritan, Sultan, Spartan a few times, but not the Scorpion I trained on.
We never ever put the skirts up, let alone swim our CVRT!!! Having watched film of those DD Shermans, I'm so glad we didn't.

Who's stupid idea was it anyway? Bloke deserved a slap..... Silly bugger!!!!!!!
 
We got our first pictures of T72 (or was it T64? T72) acquired by a very brave Brixmis crew. We learned these new tanks and how they differed from T54, T55 and T62.

But all these pictures were collected in a silver birch wood in East Germany. We became as good at identifying silver birch as T64/72.

Picture comes up, guy at front shouts T72, guy at back shouts silver birch. To this day, I see silver birch, I inwardly shout T72.
Yep. Silver birch stands still trigger me to this day, but ISTR that most of the silver birch festooned pics were of GSFG T-64.
 
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A friend of mine was in 111 Pro Coy RMP at Hohne and went to the scene. He told me that they were trying to get the driver (Tpr Brownhill?) out as the water was flooding in, but couldn't get the hatch open the full way in order to pull him through. He stayed with him throughout and had to ultimately watch him drown - heartbreaking.
I was with 1 RTR, crewing the Cent ARV moving around to the next range and we drove past it shortly after it had rolled at the corner of the road near the washdown, it had been gun rear and it was quite far down the embankment on its roof and from memory there were at least 2 ARVs on site at the time (incl. ours) but because the RMP were involved and people were trapped the Recce Mechs didnt get an opportunity to attempt to lift it before they died - its easy to say now but i think that it could have been partially lifted at least. It had quite a significant impact on all of our Sqn - I could be wrong but I seem to remember that the driver survived and was put into another tank in an effort to preserve his 'nerve' (well meaning) but had a minor accident that wasnt his fault which screwed him up.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
We never ever put the skirts up, let alone swim our CVRT!!! Having watched film of those DD Shermans, I'm so glad we didn't.

Who's stupid idea was it anyway? Bloke deserved a slap..... Silly bugger!!!!!!!
Especially when a couple of years later someone determined that
  1. there were no rivers suitable to be swum by CVR(T) in BAOR
  2. screens were easily damaged in everyday use.
 
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AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Yep. Silver birch stands still trigger me to this day, but ISTR that most of the silver birch festooned pics were of GSFG T-64.
Hence my not being sure. I've always remembered T64, but thought T72.
 
It was rare to find a Sabre Troop that had the full complement of fingers and thumbs.I was demobbed in '66 and can still see and feel scar on first knuckle of middle finger caused by Cent road wheel slipping off jack.
My middle finger now following a misunderstanding with a Chieftain loader's hatch '72.

IMG_0049 (002).JPG
 
Must have been about 1997 we took our children to visit Caldey Island off Tenby. Way in, the ferry landed at the jetty. Way out, the tide had changed. We all climbed into the back of a Stalwart which swam us out to the ferry and crossdecked.
Found this for you:

1575632442264.png

Landing craft, Caldey Island
Many types of ex-military amphibious landing craft have been used on Caldey to land passengers at very low tides. The large craft used now is a converted M2, built by EWK of Germany. The smaller vehicle on the right is a British Alvis Stalwart. On the left is a US-built duck (DUKW), previously used.
(From Humphry Bolton, licenced for re-use)
 
Especially when a couple of years later someone determined that
  1. there were no rivers suitable to be swum by CVR(T) in BAOR
  2. screens were easily damaged in everyday use.
We removed them from our Sultans about a week after receiving them, since none of our other vehicles could wade more than a big puddle.
 
Absolutely no offence taken, I took your post just as you intended I was just making a comment on how fortunate we were with the dangers involved even without an enemy firing at us.
I did my CR2 gunner and loader courses in Germany in 2000. The instructors constantly impressed safety rules and regulations on us along the lines of "tanks bite so be very careful what you do and where you put your hands/fingers..."
 

woger wabbit

Old-Salt
SOP when loading on Tk Tptr was to get lined up then instruct the tank driver to put his hands out of the hatch where they could be seen and not on the tillers ( that way there would be a strong chance that the tank would stay on the trailer.)

I interrupted a shouting match between a No1 and a Tankie who was refusing to put his hands out "because if the hatch flies forwards it will chop my fingers off"

He did not mention what might have happened to his head in the meantime.
Guillotine, "off with his head" . 8O
 
A workshop in Germany had recognition posters in the bogs on the back of the doors, to pursue while curling one down. On the T72 poster someone had helpfully added “Red stars on turret”
Probably the local Int Section boys taking the p*ss... ;-)
 
I have recounted this before on another thread, on FTX ex in BAOR we spent the weekend in Coppenbrugge having been well accommodated in the broadest sense of the word departing early on the Mon morning. As we left the town my Tp Sgt (who just happens to be a member of this site) had a gun kit malfunction, resulting in an uncontrolled traverse of the main armament which entered the upstairs window of the house they were passing, catching the curtains and rail in passing. He came to a stop shortly after, gun rear sporting said curtains hanging neatly from his barrel. Just to compound the embarrassment the rest of the Regt proceeded to drive past the unfortunate individual before he could clear the offending chintz monstrosity .
Coppenbrugge………..Thankyou 06, I`ve been trying to remember the name of that village for ages. Your memory still appears to be serving you well..................…….:salut:. Glad there are no photos.
[/QUOTE]

Cheers Dryclad, yes my memory is alright especially for all the embarrassing bits of my life, hope you that life is treating you well.

About the possibility of there being photos, I believe one may have appeared in Sixth Sense but that could just be my memory failing me.........;)
 

Boxy

GCM
We got our first pictures of T72 (or was it T64? T72) acquired by a very brave Brixmis crew. We learned these new tanks and how they differed from T54, T55 and T62.

But all these pictures were collected in a silver birch wood in East Germany. We became as good at identifying silver birch as T64/72.

Picture comes up, guy at front shouts T72, guy at back shouts silver birch. To this day, I see silver birch, I inwardly shout T72.
Glad to hear it’s not just me then...but with T64s
 
Give the Russians a call, they seem to be able to recover tanks from worse locations



Yes, but our REME tend to get there a lot quicker. Imagine waiting 70 years for recovery...

Edited to add: Bugger, beaten to by @bobthedog ;-)
 

BopBopBop

War Hero
Found this for you:

View attachment 435284
Landing craft, Caldey Island
Many types of ex-military amphibious landing craft have been used on Caldey to land passengers at very low tides. The large craft used now is a converted M2, built by EWK of Germany. The smaller vehicle on the right is a British Alvis Stalwart. On the left is a US-built duck (DUKW), previously used.
(From Humphry Bolton, licenced for re-use)
55+ years ago as a child we went on holiday to Weymouth. There was a trips around the bay outfit operating on the beach and they had a mobile jetty out in the sea that they moved with the tide.

They had a vehicle, effectively a blue box, to transport customers between the beach and the jetty.
It was an American M3? Half-track underneath.
 

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