Chicken.Not like it used to be?

#1
Back in the day, a roasted chicken allowed the meat to "fall away" from the bones.
I had roast chicken today which was apparently free range and the meat stubbornly sticks to the bone.
I have noticed the same with other organic/free range birds.So is it the way the birds are now bred or the diet they are fed on that has changed the meat texture?
 
#3
Brine it in salt water overnight. It adds a lot to the flavour and makes the meat tender and juicy so that it falls right off the bone with ease, I'm roasting one right now.;-)
 
#4
Back in the day, a roasted chicken allowed the meat to "fall away" from the bones.
I had roast chicken today which was apparently free range and the meat stubbornly sticks to the bone.
I have noticed the same with other organic/free range birds.So is it the way the birds are now bred or the diet they are fed on that has changed the meat texture?
Roasting bags might help, they seem to keep the juices in and helps the meat melt off the bone.
 
#7
I expect its the breed of chicken reared nowadays for quick growth and meat .

I used to be able to get chicken legs in Sainsburys about 10 years ago that were French . Almost red meat colour , they were bloody amazing . And about £1.10 for two .

I expect your best bet is a butcher . I have seen a website called French Click which sells French food here . Its bloody expensive for a chicken from them but might be interesting as a experiment as to how it tastes .
 
#10
Back in the day, a roasted chicken allowed the meat to "fall away" from the bones.
I had roast chicken today which was apparently free range and the meat stubbornly sticks to the bone.
I have noticed the same with other organic/free range birds.So is it the way the birds are now bred or the diet they are fed on that has changed the meat texture?
It depends how far back you are going. 'Back in the day' cock birds were 'caponised', that made them grow faster. Most table birds were cage reared, so got little exercise. This, and the rapid weight gain resulted in poor adherance of muscle fibre/ligament to bone. Soft, un-exercised muscle, combined with poorly composed feed, resulted in meat that fell apart during cooking. Combine that with injected saline and it's surprising all our birds didn't resemble chinese 'flat duck'.
 

greyfergie

MIA
Book Reviewer
#12
It depends how far back you are going. 'Back in the day' cock birds were 'caponised', that made them grow faster. Most table birds were cage reared, so got little exercise. This, and the rapid weight gain resulted in poor adherance of muscle fibre/ligament to bone. Soft, un-exercised muscle, combined with poorly composed feed, resulted in meat that fell apart during cooking. Combine that with injected saline and it's surprising all our birds didn't resemble chinese 'flat duck'.
So one nil for free range?
 
#14
#19
Well, chickens never used to have four legs, did they?
 

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