Chest Seal replacement

#1
I just got word that the Ashermann Chest Seal is going to be replaced with the Bolin Chest Seal pretty soon. Is this true?
 
#2
Yep its true!!
:)
 
#5
Its already being dished out in theatre but i would assume they are using their stocks up on the asherman...so i doubt it'll get throught to BCD for a good while yet.

The old type are very (very) unreliable...best bet is to have some sleek or other tape handy to tape around the seal once its been applied!!
 
#6
its being taught on BATLS etc, but as percybubble said the existing stocks of ashermans will be used first.
 
#7
percybubble said:
The old type are very (very) unreliable...best bet is to have some sleek or other tape handy to tape around the seal once its been applied!!
That is the very reason the Bolin replacing the Asherman. I spoke to the fella who is present at all military post-mortems at the last tri-service emergency care conference. He questioned why virtually every Asherman applied was being held in place by vast amounts of harry black.

According to this guy the Bolin uses the same adhesive as is used by THEM on door breaching charges. It will stick and form a seal with just about anything.

Sounds all right.
 
#8
DMSTC have (allegedly) been told they can't have any of the bolin seals for training as the seals are for ops only. I'm told that it's pot luck as to which one you get on ops.
Bolin seals are taught (theory only of course) on BATLS and TMI, I've not yet seen any update for BCD trainers.
 
#10
According to the theory lessons, yes, but without the need to check the valve in the same way.
 
#11
theoriginalphantom said:
According to the theory lessons, yes, but without the need to check the valve in the same way.
Cheers. Do you have any lesson notes which you could send me by any chance?
 
#12
Mr_d said:
theoriginalphantom said:
According to the theory lessons, yes, but without the need to check the valve in the same way.
Cheers. Do you have any lesson notes which you could send me by any chance?
I'll check, it may be in one of the instructor handbooks, but I think it was all verbal. Almost like they were making it up as they went along. y'know, the usual Keogh stuff.

however a quick google reveals

The BCS is a sterile occlusive chest wound dressing for treating open pneumothorax and preventing tension pneumothorax that result from gunshots, stabwounds, or other penetrating chest trauma. The patented failure-proof triple-valve design of the BCS allows air and blood to escape while preventing the re-entry of either, thereby eliminating any unwanted gas or liquid exchange at the trauma site.

The large (6” diameter), rugged polyurethane disc structure of the BCS can cover practically any size chest trauma site. The thickness of the disc prevents any disc wrinkling from occurring during application. In addition, the wound side of the disc is covered with a thick layer of jell-based adhesive, strong enough to not only seal over hair and blood but also flexible enough to be removed and reapplied to the trauma site if required. These critical characteristics of the BCS to prevent the occurrence of tension can be accomplished quickly, directly, and effectively.
comparitve test of Bolin v Asherman
 
#13
These have been around for the last 2 years... I'm sure there will be something out already or is coming out soon that's better but at the moment it miles better than the ACS.
Main points: Better adhesive so dont use black and nasty to bodge one on, wont crease up when you remove it from its packaging, valve is set flat so there's less likelyhood of it being obstructed.
 

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#14
A top tip with the Asherman. Once you have dried the chest and shaved any hair, if you need to do so, a quick wipe with a swab containing tinc benz co, making sure that you dont go into the wound, helps it to stick, just let it dry for 10 secs or so before application.
 
#15
Question for you medic type bods.....if you haven't got any of the above mentioned seals and have to improvise do you seal on 3 sides or all 4? I've read a couple of differing versions though I've personally been taught to seal on 3 sides.
 
#16
That depends on how much you know about a tension pneumothorax as a clinical condition. The preferred method would be by using a three sided dressing as this acts like a 1 way valve, letting air out of the thoracic cavity, but not letting air in. However, as with all these things its about how well you seal the edges; how big the hole is?; is it sucking?; will the wound clot onto the plastic? etc etc. The important thing from a practical point of view is do you know enough about a tension pneumothorax to be able to recognise when there is a problem developing and, how to treat it or have a plan to get the casualty to someone who can, which is a transport/logistic problem from that point on.
 
#17
That depends on how much you know about a tension pneumothorax as a clinical condition. The preferred method would be by using a three sided dressing as this acts like a 1 way valve, letting air out of the thoracic cavity, but not letting air in. However, as with all these things its about how well you seal the edges; how big the hole is?; is it sucking?; will the wound clot onto the plastic? etc etc. The important thing from a practical point of view is do you know enough about a tension pneumothorax to be able to recognise when there is a problem developing and, how to treat it or have a plan to get the casualty to someone who can, which is a transport/logistic problem from that point on.
Cheers mate....I'm a first aid and trauma care instructor (only for HASW) and it's one of the things that's usually in the syllabus. As you probably know things change quicker than a quick thing for first aid so wondered what the army were doing these days.
 

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