Chest Expanders and Archery

#21
Re-curve, 32 pounder.
When I was a primary school age I was an archer (before I moved onto fencing; I was born in the wrong century). 26 lb recurve (compound bows are for tossers). Being a skinny kid I had to do a fair bit of work on my shoulders. I found doing various types of push-up (medium hand position, wide hand position, elevated feet, etc.) both very helpful & convenient. All that's needed is a bit of floor space & a few minutes.
 
#22
Simple physics says, piece of rope fastened to post at draw height, sling/slot weight equivalent to your draw weight onto rope. Place rope over second post and pulley at draw height. Pull rope backwards thus lifting weight off ground. Fully adjustable for weight as your strength improves and then declines with age.
Options a) build frame to hold posts b) smack two posts into the garden.
Obviously not the most portable option.
What an excellent idea, I wonder why I didn't think of that.

(See post #15 :-D)

The only disadvantage I anticipate is that the fixed post thing confines you to a fixed posture and technique which might ingrain bad habits you can't instantly shed when you are actually drawing a bow.
 
#23
What an excellent idea, I wonder why I didn't think of that.

(See post #15 :-D)

The only disadvantage I anticipate is that the fixed post thing confines you to a fixed posture and technique which might ingrain bad habits you can't instantly shed when you are actually drawing a bow.
Yep with my solution you can practice your actual draw to your anchor point.
The post wouldn't allow you to draw up either.
 
#24
When I was a primary school age I was an archer (before I moved onto fencing; I was born in the wrong century). 26 lb recurve (compound bows are for tossers). Being a skinny kid I had to do a fair bit of work on my shoulders. I found doing various types of push-up (medium hand position, wide hand position, elevated feet, etc.) both very helpful & convenient. All that's needed is a bit of floor space & a few minutes.
I do some weights with dumbells, which feels like replicating some of that, but I shall look into it.

The Wife brought me a handheld thingy for this task, with some rubber bands for Christmas last year. Seemed to work quite well. Draw for 15 seconds, relax, wait two minutes, draw again. Repeat several times. Then increase form 15 to 20 etc etc.
However due to being at work six days a week I've not actually picked up my bow in five months, which is a bit of a bugger.

It was also funny to watch my Wife declare she could handle it, as she thought looking after her horses made her strong, and try the 70lb band. She went a funny shade of red, and was only at about half draw.
But I don't dwell on that when she's within hearing distance.
 
#25
I do some weights with dumbells, which feels like replicating some of that, but I shall look into it.

The Wife brought me a handheld thingy for this task, with some rubber bands for Christmas last year. Seemed to work quite well. Draw for 15 seconds, relax, wait two minutes, draw again. Repeat several times. Then increase form 15 to 20 etc etc.
However due to being at work six days a week I've not actually picked up my bow in five months, which is a bit of a bugger.

It was also funny to watch my Wife declare she could handle it, as she thought looking after her horses made her strong, and try the 70lb band. She went a funny shade of red, and was only at about half draw.
But I don't dwell on that when she's within hearing distance.
I had some similar interactions, along the lines of 'You're a kid, I'm an adult, so it must be piece of p*ss'. And then they attempted to draw & went all gammon-like. Of course, their main problem was not putting enough effort into it at the shoulder.
 
#26
Have you tried just doing some bent-over dumbbell rows? Would seem to replicate the movement fairly well, and you can use pretty much any heavy object with a handle.
 
#27
Have you tried just doing some bent-over dumbbell rows? Would seem to replicate the movement fairly well, and you can use pretty much any heavy object with a handle.
Maintaining good form is a bugger with that exercise, especially if you're getting on a bit. I'd recommend dumbbell rows whilst prone on a bench.
 

chrisg46

LE
Book Reviewer
#28
I had a go on a Long bow at Ludlow Castle on the bank holiday.

Used to use a modern bow and thought as it was a medieval day , why not try.

Bugger me it was bloody hard and it only had a draw of 80 Lb.
In my teenage years, i went to a talk on archery, specifically in the medieval period. They had a recreation of one to try, and being a strapping young lad, i had a go, but could only just about bend the string back.
I forget the exact draw but 300lb comes to mind!!
One of the things that the guy said was that for a long time, no one knew why exhumed skeletons of archers from agincourt days had physical deformities of a shoulder. It wasnt until the Mary Rose was brought up and preserved bows examined that they found out just how powerful a longbow was! As all males had to practice every Sunday on their archery skills, by the time they were adults and going to war, they had massively developed shoulders.
 
#29
Maintaining good form is a bugger with that exercise, especially if you're getting on a bit. I'd recommend dumbbell rows whilst prone on a bench.
Not seen it done prone, but this is a pretty common form of the exercise

 
#30
Not seen it done prone, but this is a pretty common form of the exercise

Silly me. I thought you were talking about this one:

bentoves.jpg


The one you referred to is known to me as the kneeling dumbbell row. And, yes, it's a good exercise. I've done it myself.
 
#31
In my teenage years, i went to a talk on archery, specifically in the medieval period. They had a recreation of one to try, and being a strapping young lad, i had a go, but could only just about bend the string back.
I forget the exact draw but 300lb comes to mind!!
One of the things that the guy said was that for a long time, no one knew why exhumed skeletons of archers from agincourt days had physical deformities of a shoulder. It wasnt until the Mary Rose was brought up and preserved bows examined that they found out just how powerful a longbow was! As all males had to practice every Sunday on their archery skills, by the time they were adults and going to war, they had massively developed shoulders.
Definitely not 300, the beefiest Mary Rose bow was +-180lb. Check out the English Warbow Society, they still shoot old-school longbows with ridiculous draw weights.
 

chrisg46

LE
Book Reviewer
#32
Definitely not 300, the beefiest Mary Rose bow was +-180lb. Check out the English Warbow Society, they still shoot old-school longbows with ridiculous draw weights.
Quite happy to accept your correction - it was a fecking lot though!
 
#34
What an excellent idea, I wonder why I didn't think of that.

(See post #15 :-D)

The only disadvantage I anticipate is that the fixed post thing confines you to a fixed posture and technique which might ingrain bad habits you can't instantly shed when you are actually drawing a bow.
It wasn't exactly a totally serious suggestion and yes it was only one page so I should have bothered to read it first.
 
#36
Definitely not 300, the beefiest Mary Rose bow was +-180lb. Check out the English Warbow Society, they still shoot old-school longbows with ridiculous draw weights.
See my post just before. The Archers of Teame had a hard core group of , Pha, we only use original methods and materials.

I was very impressed when the did “ clout” shooting.

Small wooden target about 100m away , which they hit more than not with their original weapons.
 
#37
See my post just before. The Archers of Teame had a hard core group of , Pha, we only use original methods and materials.

I was very impressed when the did “ clout” shooting.

Small wooden target about 100m away , which they hit more than not with their original weapons.
Mine's a Eurasian composite, but a proper yew longbow is next on my list. I fancy a bit of clout.

Oo-er.
 
#38
Whatever it was works for this lass!
Amazing the carefully defined parts of the body that can be developed.

Back to more common sense: I use a couple of old bicycle inner tubes for building arm strength for pistol shooting. Link the two together, one loop end under my foot, the other end over my wrist, grip pistol and raise arm to shooting position.
 
#39
How about pull ups on a door gym? You can do them assisted, putting one foot on a chair, if you can't heave your body weight up.

Pull with your elbows with an overhand grip (rather than be bicep heavy) and it'll target all those back muscles.
 
#40
I recently took up archery, and have been sorting myself out after a bad accuracy start. One of the issues I'm having is Although I wish to eventually push up to a higher draw weight on my bow, I'm not getting enough time to shoot to improve the muscle groups that you use to draw the bow. Equally if I miss a few days weight training as can sometimes happen my ability to draw my bow also drops.

Now the obvious answer is use the bow at home, unloaded. but that's a bit of a ball ache assembling it, getting the safety gear out etc etc. It's also not something I can take with me. It'd be much easier just to use a chest expander.

I've never ever looked at these before so they're a completely foreign piece of equipment to me. Googling the subject seems to be full of weirdness and options. It maybe that I'm just being dense, but how does one know what the Draw weight of these is? Can you adjust the draw weight as well?
I mean its no good me buying one that turns out to be a lower draw weight than my bow, or one that I'll bypass in a year or so as my bow draw weight goes up.

Any advice? Or has anyone got any ideas?
Thanks.
Get in touch with this BLESMA guy. Despite the loss of one eye and both legs, he is approaching olympian standard as an archer. Steve Gill: Road to Rio
 

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