Cherokees protest the White Man's Racism (or were they just not thinking?)

#1
Bass Pro Shops pulls Trail of Tears rifle amid complaints

November 15, 2018



TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Bass Pro Shops pulled a used 1978 Winchester rifle commemorating the Cherokee Trail of Tears from one of its Arkansas store’s shelves and apologized to the tribe after a photo of the gun led to calls to boycott the outdoor gear chain.

A customer in Rogers, Arkansas, posted photos of the rifle on Twitter, leading to accusations that Bass Pro was profiting from the tragic forced relocation of the Cherokee Nation that began in 1838. More than 4,000 Cherokee died during the more than 1,000-mile walk to what is now Oklahoma in what is known as the Trail of Tears.

The company’s communications director, Jack Wlezien, told The Tulsa World that the rifle was acquired from a trade-in and is not part of the store’s standard stock.

“It’s a niche product that came in on a trade,” Wlezien said. “As you can imagine, there are a wide range of firearms traded on a regular basis, and there wasn’t much deep consideration about the individual gun from a merchandising standpoint by our (sales) associate, but now we are taking steps to be sure we’re dealing with it appropriately.”

Cherokee Nation Secretary of State Chuck Hoskin Jr. applauded the company’s decision to remove the rifle and “for using the incident as a teaching moment.”

“The story of the Trail of Tears is one of survival and the ability to adapt and survive in unimaginable circumstances,” he said. “We hope in today’s environment companies will reach out to Native tribes to better understand our history.”

The Tulsa World reported that according to the website winchestercollector.org, a .30-30 or .22-caliber Winchester Model 1894 “Cherokee Carbine” that matches the image of the Bass Pro Shops rifle was one of dozens of Winchester rifles manufactured from 1964 to 2006 that annually commemorated people and historic events, including Bat Masterson, John Wayne and the purchase of Alaska from Russia.

___

Information from: Tulsa World, http://www.tulsaworld.com

What's next? A commemorative MG 34 remembering the heady days of the Holocaust? :rolleyes:

Winchester Rifle Trail of Tears.JPG
 
#2
Welcome to the outrage culture, yet none of these people were alive to actually experience said event. If only people felt the same away about desecrating Civil War monuments.
 
#3
Bass Pro Shops pulls Trail of Tears rifle amid complaints

November 15, 2018



TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Bass Pro Shops pulled a used 1978 Winchester rifle commemorating the Cherokee Trail of Tears from one of its Arkansas store’s shelves and apologized to the tribe after a photo of the gun led to calls to boycott the outdoor gear chain.

A customer in Rogers, Arkansas, posted photos of the rifle on Twitter, leading to accusations that Bass Pro was profiting from the tragic forced relocation of the Cherokee Nation that began in 1838. More than 4,000 Cherokee died during the more than 1,000-mile walk to what is now Oklahoma in what is known as the Trail of Tears.

The company’s communications director, Jack Wlezien, told The Tulsa World that the rifle was acquired from a trade-in and is not part of the store’s standard stock.

“It’s a niche product that came in on a trade,” Wlezien said. “As you can imagine, there are a wide range of firearms traded on a regular basis, and there wasn’t much deep consideration about the individual gun from a merchandising standpoint by our (sales) associate, but now we are taking steps to be sure we’re dealing with it appropriately.”

Cherokee Nation Secretary of State Chuck Hoskin Jr. applauded the company’s decision to remove the rifle and “for using the incident as a teaching moment.”

“The story of the Trail of Tears is one of survival and the ability to adapt and survive in unimaginable circumstances,” he said. “We hope in today’s environment companies will reach out to Native tribes to better understand our history.”

The Tulsa World reported that according to the website winchestercollector.org, a .30-30 or .22-caliber Winchester Model 1894 “Cherokee Carbine” that matches the image of the Bass Pro Shops rifle was one of dozens of Winchester rifles manufactured from 1964 to 2006 that annually commemorated people and historic events, including Bat Masterson, John Wayne and the purchase of Alaska from Russia.

___

Information from: Tulsa World, http://www.tulsaworld.com

What's next? A commemorative MG 34 remembering the heady days of the Holocaust? :rolleyes:

View attachment 363532
I would love to own a Martini Henry that had 'C/ Sgt Bourne' scratched into the stock.
 
#5
Welcome to the outrage culture, yet none of these people were alive to actually experience said event. If only people felt the same away about desecrating Civil War monuments.
I'm with you on that, Lionsy. Hands off the Civil War monuments - especially the ones recognizing our Gallant Lads in Grey.

New Orleans 12.jpg
 
#6
Welcome to the outrage culture, yet none of these people were alive to actually experience said event. If only people felt the same away about desecrating Civil War monuments.
I know what you mean but, I think this is a bit different. I actually oppose the removal of Confederate memorials as they are remembrances for a time in history. The, what appears to be, predominantly non-white population in Dallas keeps having a go at every piece of confederate history they can find.

But, selling a rifle for trail of tears is a bit like selling holocaust remembrance concentration camp pyjamas, Zyklon B marked thermos flasks, or tins of gold foil wrapped chocolate teeth in baccy tins marked up Auschwitz.
 
#7
I'm with you on that, Lionsy. Hands off the Civil War monuments - especially the ones recognizing our Gallant Lads in Grey.

View attachment 363540

Well the people that want to selectively erase history are no better than the Taliban. Be it good or bad it should stay.

The rifle might be insensitive to some, but one should also not be so easily offended either. It’s not like you can’t just ignore it and worry about other more pressing issues. Like the drug pandemic on reservations, which does more than hurt feelings. Focus on the real issues, not the piddly shit.
 
#8
#9
I know what you mean but, I think this is a bit different. I actually oppose the removal of Confederate memorials as they are remembrances for a time in history. The, what appears to be, predominantly non-white population in Dallas keeps having a go at every piece of confederate history they can find.

But, selling a rifle for trail of tears is a bit like selling holocaust remembrance concentration camp pyjamas, Zyklon B marked thermos flasks, or tins of gold foil wrapped chocolate teeth in baccy tins marked up Auschwitz.
The rifle theme might not be the most tactful, but it was just a trade in. Not planned company advertising on a national level.
 
#10
...
But, selling a rifle for trail of tears is a bit like selling holocaust remembrance concentration camp pyjamas, Zyklon B marked thermos flasks, or tins of gold foil wrapped chocolate teeth in baccy tins marked up Auschwitz.
I assume that's Swiss chocolate.
 
#12
Once knew a Guardsmen CSM Finch who was the dead spit of C/Sgt Bourne, scared the living daylights out of me.. On the actual thread, the Cherokees weren't they one of the five tribes who allied with the confederacy. That aside, the culture stuff is out of control and if it keeps going to new extremes then things are going to get bad very quickly.
 
#13
The Tulsa World reported that according to the website winchestercollector.org, a .30-30 or .22-caliber Winchester Model 1894 “Cherokee Carbine” that matches the image of the Bass Pro Shops rifle was one of dozens of Winchester rifles manufactured from 1964 to 2006 that annually commemorated people and historic events, including Bat Masterson, John Wayne and the purchase of Alaska from Russia.
Question 1: What, if any, was the outrage at the time when thousands of the 'Cherokee Carbine' commemorative rifles were originally produced and sold?

Question 2: What, if any, would have been the outrage when Winchester, after producing commemorative rifles every year but not including First Nation history in its product line, would not have produced a 'Cherokee Carbine' commemorative rifle?

Cheers,
Dan.
 
#14
To be fair, you can see why the First Nations people might be a peed of that this is out there.
"Buy a Winchester Rifle. The rifle that won the West. Now with added genocide celebration paint job."

But then it has been around for a few years so why the fuss now? Because somebody has seen it for the first time.
 

MOzanne

On ROPS
On ROPs
#15
To be fair, you can see why the First Nations people might be a peed of that this is out there.
"Buy a Winchester Rifle. The rifle that won the West. Now with added genocide celebration paint job."

But then it has been around for a few years so why the fuss now? Because somebody has seen it for the first time.
Or alternatively

"Winchester 66 The gun that won the Battle of the Little Big Horn"
 
#16
Well the people that want to selectively erase history are no better than the Taliban. Be it good or bad it should stay.

The rifle might be insensitive to some, but one should also not be so easily offended either. It’s not like you can’t just ignore it and worry about other more pressing issues. Like the drug pandemic on reservations, which does more than hurt feelings. Focus on the real issues, not the piddly shit.
Moving them to a museum isnt erasing history, baffling why they were put up in the first place.
 
#17
Drawing attention to a commemorative rifle that is 100% legal to own does nothing for the Cherokee really, vast majority of the populace don’t care. It will however make many owners of that particular Winchester issue very happy as it becomes more valuable. The outrage bus seems to backfire on occasions like this....
 
#18
I know what you mean but, I think this is a bit different. I actually oppose the removal of Confederate memorials as they are remembrances for a time in history. The, what appears to be, predominantly non-white population in Dallas keeps having a go at every piece of confederate history they can find.

But, selling a rifle for trail of tears is a bit like selling holocaust remembrance concentration camp pyjamas, Zyklon B marked thermos flasks, or tins of gold foil wrapped chocolate teeth in baccy tins marked up Auschwitz.

You see something bad, I see a marketing opportunity. Blue and white PJ's obviously.
 
#19
I'd firstly like to say that I oppose the destruction of Confederate memorials too; they are historic memorials to the most tragic times in US history but I'd like to add a tongue in cheek comment:

The Democratic Party in the US was founded c1828 by Andrew Jackson (who was responsible for the Trail of Tears btw.) They seem to have gone from strength to strength, supporting firstly racism and slavery, then Secession along with the Confederacy. Next came the Civil War, which they supported from the said Confederacy's point of view of course. After that contretemps they have supported racism, Jim Crow laws, and Segregation. Now and then they have supported gun control laws as well.

Seems to me if you want to ban or ostracize anything, you might as well start with that there Democratic Party.
 
#20
Once knew a Guardsmen CSM Finch who was the dead spit of C/Sgt Bourne, scared the living daylights out of me.. On the actual thread, the Cherokees weren't they one of the five tribes who allied with the confederacy. That aside, the culture stuff is out of control and if it keeps going to new extremes then things are going to get bad very quickly.
Do you mean the real C/Sgt Frank Bourne or Nigel Green who played him on screen?
 

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