Cherie Blair PR stunt

#1
This will win the voters over. Look how the Prime Minister's wife's heart bleeds for the underdog, how willing she is to represent anyone, no matter what their age/colour/race/sexuality or religion, it's touching.

the times said:
Muslim girl wins battle to wear traditional dress in school
By Chris Johnston, Times Online

Shabina Begum


A Muslim schoolgirl today won her legal battle to wear traditional "head-to-toe" dress in the classroom, in a case that will force multi-faith schools to make their uniform rules comply with human rights laws.

Shabina Begum, 15, accused the head teacher and governors of Denbigh High School in Luton, Bedfordshire, of denying her the "right to education and to manifest her religious beliefs" for its ban on the jilbab, a dress that leaves only the hands and face exposed.

Lord Justice Brooke, vice-president of the Court of Appeal's civil division, today ruled that her school had unlawfully excluded Ms Begum, denied her the right to manifest her religion, and denied her access to suitable and appropriate education.

Ms Begum was represented at the appeal court by Cherie Booth, QC, Tony Blair's wife.

Speaking outside the court this morning, Shabina, now 16 and attending a school where the jilbab is allowed, called the decision "a victory for all Muslims who wish to preserve their identity and values despite prejudice and bigotry".

She said: "The decision of Denbigh High School to prevent my adherence to my religion cannot unfortunately be viewed as merely a local decision taken in isolation.

"Rather it was a consequence of an atmosphere that has been created in Western societies post 9/11, an atmosphere in which Islam has been made a target for vilification in the name of the War on Terror."

Denbigh High had maintained its ban to help children to resist the recruiting efforts of extremist Muslim groups. Today it said that the case had been lost on a technicality and insisted the school was proud of its multiracial policy.

"Denbigh High is a multiracial, multifaith school with a uniform policy that takes into account the cultural and religious sensitivities of pupils at the school. The policy was agreed by the governing body following wide consultation with the DfES (Department of Education and Skills), pupils, parents, schools and leading Muslim organisations.

"The case was lost due to a small technical breach of the Human Rights Act. The judges accepted that the school is entitled to have a uniform policy and could see nothing wrong with it. The policy will be reviewed as it always is annually."

Ms Begum's local education authority, Luton Borough Council, added that all schools would now be advised to take pupils' religion into account when imposing school uniform rules.

A spokesman said: "We are pleased that the Court of Appeal upheld the uniform policy of Denbigh High School. However, in light of their judgment, we will be developing guidance on school uniform and advising Luton schools' governing bodies to review their uniform policy, taking into account the religious and cultural needs of pupils."

Ms Booth, QC, told the judges at a hearing last December that the case involved "fundamental issues" about the nature and interpretation of Ms Begum's rights to education and freedom to practise her religion.

Last June, High Court judge Mr Justice Bennett dismissed the girl's application for judicial review, ruling she had failed to show that the "highly successful" 1,000-pupil school, where 79 per cent of students are Muslims, had excluded her or breached her human rights.

The school already allowed girls to wear a headscarf with the shalwar kameez - loose trousers and tunic approved by local Muslim leaders.

Ms Booth said that Mr Justice Bennett was saying that the school, which sent her home after she refused to wear authorised school uniform, was entitled to "pick and choose" which religious beliefs it accepted.

Lord Justice Brooke today called on the Department of Education and Skills to give schools more guidance on how to comply with their obligations under the Human Rights Act.

A DfES spokesperson said: "Our school uniform guidance states that governors should bear in mind their responsibilities under sex and race discrimination legislation and the Human Rights Act, be sensitive to pupils' cultural and religious needs and differences and give high priority to cost considerations. Schools are expected to consult parents about school uniform matters wherever possible."

Ms Begum added outside court today: "As a young woman growing up in a post 9/11 Britain, I have witnessed a great deal of bigotry from the media, politicians and legal officials. This bigotry resulted from my choice to wear a piece of cloth, not out of coercion, but out of my faith and belief in Islam.

"It is amazing that in the so-called free world I have to fight to wear this attire. This amazement has not been left unnoticed in my community, the Muslim community, who see a concerted effort to dehumanise Muslims and vilify Islam. I suspect cases like mine will not be the last, but nevertheless I hope that my case will give strength to others."
On top of that, does this mean that a child whose religion is "Jedi" can come to school dressed as Luke Skywalker?
 
#2
Does Cherie Booth-Blair have a law practice in Luton?

I'll leave you to join the dots


Cherie Blair
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.A 15 year old , whose parents are no longer here.
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.The Muslim council of Great Britain
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The Muslim vote
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Cherie Blair.
 
#3
atmosphere that has been created in Western societies post 9/11, an atmosphere in which Islam has been made a target for vilification in the name of the War on Terror
How can anyone think badly of Muslims, just because some of them killed over 3000 people in NY, the name of Islam; and planted bombs in Bali, Madrid and elsewhere, in the name of Islam; and killed God knows how many people in Afghanistan and elsewhere, in the name of Islam. Even now there are some who, despite being born in this country, which educates them, takes care of their health , pays their legal aid and just about everything else, are planning attacks against this country, in the name of Islam.

I wonder if, as a devout Muslim woman, she would have been able to take a case about her rights to court in, say, Saudi, and be represented by a female barrister?

Just glad to see there are no double standards, as usual.
 

Unknown_Quantity

War Hero
Moderator
#4
I think the judge should have sloped shoulders and ditched the case entirely. This, in my opinion, was a waste of time and money. If Ms Begum, or her parents had such a problem with the school why could they not go elsewhere? Does Luton only have one high school? Why should individual pupils dictate how the school will run, especially when
The judges accepted that the school is entitled to have a uniform policy and could see nothing wrong with it.
Total arrse.
 
#5
The case was lost on a technicality, therefore the school did not actively discriminate against here because of her religion or religious dress.

A_S

PS thanks to the mod that removed my post on this story, i was just about to when i noticed it had gone. Super-efficient mods again :D
 
#6
Well,my,my..

whatever the young lady in question was wearing, it certainly didn't impede her acquiring a top education.. I am quite taken with her use of language and elucidation if, indeed, the quotes attributed to her are accurate..

So nice to see a young person of any persuasion who can speak such eloquent and erudite Queen's English and not come beofe the media with..
" right, th' judge tol' the school to naff off, an I'm for it.. so's I'm wearing my stuff an yous all can stuff it. "

Funny how she couldn't accept the dress code approved by the Council of Muslims [ I thought adherence to the words of Allah as proclaimed and interpreted by the Imams was only right and proper for a dutiful daughter of Mohammed?]

And, as for Jedi Knights in school.. Go for it!.. 20,000 people in Canada wrote that on their last census as ' Religion '...Government has accepted that as valid..Still the top two over here are RC and None..can't say as I like the None Churches, though, very drab.. and lousy music, too...
 
#7
Most impressed with the young ladies political speech carefully read from notes and supervised by the weird bloke who loomed over her on all the news reports. Seems the coverall dress was her interpretation of Koranic edict which is not specific. Of course, it is the same faith that will possibly see her married to a bloke she has never seen before he wedding day. He will take her away and unwrap her whole body. If he is really traditional, he will expose the bloodstains on the bridal bedding so as to demonstrate her virtue.
Funny old thing religion.
 
#8
She's lucky, some Muslim countries don't allow women to be educated.

Is that dress she's fighting for really mandated by the Koran (Qur’an, Alcoran)? I've heard it isn't. Along the same lines of denying women education isn't.
 
#9
OldRedCap said:
Most impressed with the young ladies political speech carefully read from notes and supervised by the weird bloke who loomed over her on all the news reports. Seems the coverall dress was her interpretation of Koranic edict which is not specific. Of course, it is the same faith that will possibly see her married to a bloke she has never seen before he wedding day. He will take her away and unwrap her whole body. If he is really traditional, he will expose the bloodstains on the bridal bedding so as to demonstrate her virtue.
Funny old thing religion.
Quite true. I wouln't worry. If she is as devout as she wants to make out she will be married off to an illiterate, non-English speaking peasent in a year and be restricted to the house whislst being beaten black and blue. Or am I just being cynical?
 
#10
Christ, is it just me or does this shite just wear you down. For all its faults Britain (and other western countries) makes a genuine attempt to adapt and intergrate immigrants into society. The vast majority of immigrants have like-mindedly adapted their traditional livews to settle in their new country. Yet it is these minor 'I'm making a stand', 'using your own legal system against you' situations that create a disproportionate reduction of the British culture.

State run schools should be supported for their efforts to establish a degree of discipline amongst children through things like dress codes. Even the court agreed but still the council is going to advise schools to be even more understanding to religious needs. It seems to me the school had already consulted widely and gained all the agreement necessary.

When will someone have the balls to say enough is enough. The dress code is not unreasonable. If you don't like it buggir off.

There, I'm all warmed up now. Off to the NAAFI.
 
#11
her brothers a wouldbe ayattolah only won on a technicality she's gone to another school. its the culutral equilient of being banned for wearing beckhams latest stupid haircut. should never have got to court .
stroppy cow should be sent to muslim equilent of brat camp (':twisted:')
 
#12
Funnily enough, that brat camp's methods are also being displayed on channel 4........!
 
E

error_unknown

Guest
#14
When she was making her speech did anyone hear what the male in the street was shouting?
 
#15
:"Get back in that kitchen"?
 
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