Chavez: Venezuela To Nationalize Entire Energy Industry

Discussion in 'Current Affairs, News and Analysis' started by Not_Whistlin_Dixie, Jan 14, 2007.

Welcome to the Army Rumour Service, ARRSE

The UK's largest and busiest UNofficial military website.

The heart of the site is the forum area, including:

  1. From Reuters.

    Venzuelan Pres. Hugo Chavez announced that his government would nationalize all Venezuelan energy assets and firms.

    He added that the Venezuelan government would nevertheless continue to permit foreign equity holdings in such firms but only as minority interests. Henceforward the government will hold at least 51% equity stakes.

    He also stated that his government would nationalize Venzuela's largest telecommunications firm.

    'We have decided to nationalize the whole Venezuelan energy and electricity sector, all of it, absolutely all.'

    "Venezuela to nationalize 'absolutely all' energy sector" 14 January 2007
    http://money.cnn.com/2007/01/13/news/international/chavez.reut/index.htm
     
  2. Fidel Castro is on his last legs.Its not his brother Raoul that will take control of Cuba when Castro expires, but Fidel's close friend and understudy Mr Chavez himself.
    Chavez has just persuaded his colleagues to give him the power to rule by decree, aka Dictatorship. Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, Cuba has lost most, if not all, of its support from Russia,Mr Chavez has been making up this short fall by pumping millions of dollars of aid into Cuba, propping up its now fragile economy.Venezuela has just purchased many many planes for its Air Force from Russia, and I believe that it is the intention of Mr Chavez to set up a Venezuelan Air Force Base in Cuba, now or later ,and after the death of Castro, a Political/Military alliance with Cuba.
    Chavez at present is attempting to finish the job that the Russians/Cubans have started in the Caribbean .He is wooing some Caribbean countries with Never Never Oil Deals. Sometime in the next few days he is scheduled to open a Venezuelan sponsored Oil Refinery in the former British Colony of Dominica. A few miles off the same Dominican coast is a hitherto uninhabited island known as Birds Island, of which Dominica has always laid claim. Mr Chavez has virtually invaded the island and has a small garrison on it. The Bermuda Triangle Temperate War is about to begin. When someone referred to Chavez as Che Guevara with oil, they were not far off the mark.
     
  3. Nothing special with it. BTW, nationalization was widely used in the UK after WW2.

    Leading Saudi oil company Aramco is state-run. And who cares? Main Western oil-firms actively cooperate with Aramco and in the case of Venezuela it will go the same way. If not then Russian Lukoil or TNK would be happy to fill this gap.
     
  4. ... and it was a total, complete and utter disaster.
     
  5. Oh sweet Jesus! :shakefist:

    I thought guys like these died out with the fall of the Berlin Wall!

    Just look at this balanced and non-loaded statement.

    He is a perfect example of a power hungry politico, who will use any and all of the buzz-words of the day, to vindicate his rabid statements.

    Shades of Reds under the bed, anyone?
     
  6. If he was talking about the same Venezuala that I visited, I cannot imagine pushy Muslims being given house-room. I think any taking up residence there would need to watch their Ps and Qs. Out in the small towns and villages, I found the people to be fiercely Roman Catholic. Without doubt they were friendly, polite and even generous but I wouldn't have wanted to piss them off.
     
  7. chrisg46

    chrisg46 LE Book Reviewer

    Robertson is a failed US presidential candidate....who is worse, bush or robertson? scary thought....
     
  8. A Muslim takeover in Venezuela. Yes ok, obviously Holy Mother Church has left the building.

    How the f**k do these retards get airtime?
     
  9. Mr_Fingerz

    Mr_Fingerz LE Book Reviewer

    Didn't Pat Robertson own a TV station once (PTL or something of that ilk)?
     
  10. That is excellent news. It's about time this country had control of its own natural resources. And the end to an absurd situation where a country's lifeblood is syphoned off to serve the interests of greedy corporate behemoths is long overdue.

    I fervently hope Chavez will continue with his social reforms and build a country that looks after and promotes the interests of its people (including the middle classes). If he continues to keep a healthy distance from the worlds' unscrupulous oil / gas / electric companies, ignores their bribes and uses their expertise only for good ends then all power to the man (no pun intended).

    I heard on the radio tonight that a Latin American summit recently, Chavez suddenly span around in his chair to directly face George Bush, saying 'Good Day, Mr President.'

    Bush apparently turned many colours before spluttering something incoherent. What a tw@
     
  11. Yes it was. Aren't we all so pleased that they got rid of British Rail and now give even larger subsidies to the private contractors.
    Like a sort of capitalist welfare programme. At least the money is going to people who deserve it, people who read The Telegraph what! what!
     
  12. But of course it is...

    Are you trying to be ironic frenchperson? - "including the middle classes"? Chavez has effectively declared economic, political, and social war on the middle classes in the Bolivarian Republic, with vast numbers of said middle classes fleeing the place. Anyone with even the most cursory knowledge of history has to know that once the middle classes flee a country, societal collapse is not far off, followed by the ultimate collapse of the state. Now, I'm sure that all this leftist posturing on the part of Chavez - cosying-up to Fidel and blowing raspberries at the Americans - goes down very well with all the cappuccino-communists in the West who never quite got over the collapse of their dreams back c.1989, but seriously frenchperson; what do you think - as opposed to hope - will be the longterm outcome of this experiment in agit-prop on the part of Chavez? There is a growing body of opinion - even amongst his supporters - that Chavez is skirting dangerously close to taking things too far. For goodness sake, Chavez has muzzled political opposition, and is closing down any print or broadcast media that doesn't toe his line; in addition to which he is now ruling by decree and has openly declared his desire to rule until 2034? Not by any stretch of the imagination does this constitute democracy. It is shoddy in the extreme to champion this man.
     
  13. Chávez is a bigmouth and a buffoon.

    Despite record oil revenues, the country is being impoverished, and the population lives largely on the dole, in far greater numbers than when he first rose to power. The bright and enterprising (the ones Frenchperson calls corrupted) are trying to leave, or simply despairing.

    Frenchperson's vision of the situation foreign energy companies enjoy in Venezuela is outdated and caricatural, to say the least. Far from being the vampires he pretends they are, they have been quite minor and vulnerable partners of the state, a risky endeavour, as Chávez decision shows. They've made investments, brought expertise and trained the Venezuelan workforce, things the country was unable to provide for itself -- and things it will discover it's still unable to provide.

    What is really tiresome is that this kind of economic stupidity has again and again proved itself a recipe for disaster in Latin American, but we never seem to learn.

    Chávez's foreign policy is also a beauty to behold. He's already quite friendly with Iran, a move that certainly attends to the best interests of Venezuela. (By the way, the week he went to Tehran, his police invaded a Jewish elementary school in Caracas, looking for Mossad spies among the seven-year-olds and their teachers. He must have thought something like that was de riguer, just to show the mullahs how chummy he wanted to be.)

    And now he has his own Enabling Law. I wonder how long it will take till he demands to be called El Conductor.
     
  14. As an example of British railways showed it was not a total disaster. The real disater followed later.

    Edited to add.

    SLRboy, sorry, I haven't seen you post making my comment.