Charmes / Essegney military cemetary

Discussion in 'Military History and Militaria' started by Alsacien, Apr 3, 2012.

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  1. Alsacien

    Alsacien LE Moderator

    As far as I know this is the most Southerly CWG cemetery on the Western Front. It is particularly interesting due to the variety of nationalities buried there, all with CWG Portland stone headstones.
    Not the easiest place to find, and certainly one that nobody finds by accident, if anyone is thinking of visiting, PM me for more specific info.

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    CWGC - Cemetery Details
     
  2. Alsacien

    Alsacien LE Moderator

    A few more:

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  3. Have you been to Vevey Alsacien? It's near Lucerne.
     
  4. Alsacien

    Alsacien LE Moderator

    No I have not, I did not even know there was one there and I lived in Lucerne briefly.

    I just looked it up:

    CWGC - Cemetery Details

    Another unusual story....
     
  5. Oh and your photo of Lewis Grayson's headstone is an interesting and rare item. He was awarded the Croix de Guerre by the French. The IWM has some very interesting journals and diaries which give an idea of his contribution to the war effort.

    Also possibly of interest - when you are a"buff" you forget what is and isn't of interest to normal people...

     
  6. Alsacien

    Alsacien LE Moderator

    Well I think I am normal, and I found it interesting.... :)

    I find myself looking into specific rather than general things - like the Rajputana Rifles and Hodsons Horse units of a couple of those chaps above had on their gravestones.

    It is my personal interpretation of "they will not be forgotten".
     
  7. Exactly how I feel...the personal or specific is often so much more interesting than the genral or the big picture...I remember visiting Dartmoor Cemtery on the Somme. In a row near the rear wall were the graves of a father and son, killed on the same day...and that of the oldest known (declared) casualty, a 68 year old Transport Officer with an MID - Henry Webber...

    It's a particularly interesting cemetery that one - with a VC grave and a general officer...blimey I must be boring you. Thanks for the Charmes phots.
     
  8. Hang on - my bad...no general officer in Dartmoor CWGC...
     
  9. Some good photos there...it reminds me of the CWGC cemetery in St Omer that is sadly overlooked by many...again it has many nationalities: Indians, Chinese labourers as well as British ansd Empire troops.
    LONGUENESSE (ST. OMER) SOUVENIR CEMETERY

    One that I found is in Dinant in Belgium. At the top of the fortress is a French war cemetery from the WW1. In the corner however, are two ww2 Bomber crews - Aussies IIRC. You get the feeling that they are not visited very often.
     
  10. I am not sure whether Moussey is higher or lower lattitude than Charmes, Moussey Churchyard has the bodies of men killed on Operation Loyton.. These men - and the French people who protrected them are commeorated by a small shrubbery at the NMA.

    CWGC - Cemetery Details
     
  11. Love the stuff about the ambulances.

    I'll have to find a publication specifically about the history of the military ambulance, unless someone can kindly give me directions.
     
  12. "The Motor Ambulance Convoys were commanded by RAMC officers, whilst running repairs, supplies, parts, petrol, billeting and rationing were the responsibility of the ASC; major repairs were to be conducted by the BRCS at Boulogne or other Base."

    On a slight tangent ,my Great-Grandfather who was 45 at the outbreak of war, got turned down when he volunteered for the infantry for being too old. As he was a motor engineer and he then asked about the ASC and was within 10 days of attestation in France. He ended up in a ASC Repair Depot - 21st MT Coy, GHQ ASC - in Paris repairing...Red Cross Ambulances.

    The depot was in St Denis in the north of Paris and the Stade de France was built over it. Always makes me chuckle that the French are playing on a British Army base!
     
  13. All -
    I have found that THIS site is also a very useful one, and has a different viewpoint -

    index

    tac
     
  14. 'Philip Ponchur, Imperial Russian Army, 1918'

    Would like to know the story behind that one.