Charles Haughey Dies

#1
The former Irish prime minister Charles Haughey has died at his Dublin home at the age of 80 after a long illness.

Premier for three separate terms between 1979 and 1992, he was widely considered to be the most controversial Irish politician of his generation.

He will be sadly missed, certainly by the Irish Revenue Commission !!!
 

Mr_Fingerz

LE
Book Reviewer
#3
I certainly won't miss the old crook.
 
#4
Just looking for my dancing shoes.
 
#5
mistersoft said:
Just looking for my dancing shoes.
Actually historically when Haughey was a junior minister, he introduced free home fuel and free nationwide travel for OAP's.

Its a shame no government in the UK has ever done that..
 
#6
Actually historically, I was looking for my dancing shoes.

But now I've found them.
 
#7
mistersoft said:
Actually historically, I was looking for my dancing shoes.

But now I've found them.
Compared to Eamon De Valera, Charlie was not that bad!
 
#8
I'd say they are about equal.

Dead.
 
#9
mistersoft said:
I'd say they are about equal.

Dead.
Now your being silly :eek:
 
#11
india-juliet said:
mistersoft said:
I'd say they are about equal.

Dead.
Now your being silly :eek:
Just pointing that he never has been or obviously never will be on my christmas card list.

The news has totally made my day.
 
#12
india-juliet said:
Actually historically when Haughey was a junior minister, he introduced free home fuel and free nationwide travel for OAP's.

Its a shame no government in the UK has ever done that..
india-juliet said:
Compared to Eamon De Valera, Charlie was not that bad!

In 1970/71 Haughey was involved with a cabal within Fianna Fáil which sought to illegally import arms for the IRA (an act at best seditious, and at worst treasonous), and he advocated military intervention in Northern Ireland (ironic considering his party's inbuilt opposition to the Defence Forces).

See here - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arms_Crisis

He was a political opportunist of the first order, who despite his frequent claims to being a Republican, was first and foremost a Haugheyite; he was not above aping the very Anglo-Irish gentry he and his fellow Fianna Fáil 'men of no property' purported to hate. He also tacitly approved of the Argentine invasion of the Falklands (but then, having burnt a Union Jack raised by Trinity students on VE Day 1945, this was only par for the course). In the 1970s and 80s, when the Republic was hemorrhaging people and jobs, he and his cronies were living the high life, whilst his collusion with certain businessmen allowed a great deal of capital to escape tax - and therefore further weaken the economy. The revisionist blather about how he laid the groundwork for the Celtic Tiger will no doubt reach a crescendo as his state funeral nears. The best response I have heard to this sort of thinking is that one doesn't thank someone who has just robbed and beaten you senseless for belatedly calling an ambulance.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Haughey

A series of political, financial and personal scandals have tarnished his image and reputation in recent years. In the late 1990s the public were shocked to hear revelations about his extravagant private life. At the Moriarty Tribunal it was revealed that Haughey received more than £8 million over an 18-year period from various benefactors and businessmen. One payment alone of £1.3 million came from the entrepreneur Ben Dunne. He was severely ridiculed when he was found out to have spent large sums of Fianna Fáil party money on Charvet shirts and expensive dinners in a top Dublin restaurant, while preaching belt tightening and implementing budget cuts as a national policy. While giving evidence at the tribunal, Haughey faced criminal charges for obstructing the work of the tribunal, and also faced an angry crowd at Dublin Castle where his wrongdoings came to light.

One fact which sticks in the minds of most Irish people when considering Haughey's true attitude to friendship and wealth was the revelation that money raised by donation and intended for a liver transplant for the late Brian Lenihan, a former government minister and supposed lifelong friend of Haughey, ended up in Charles Haughey's bank account. It was spent on £700 shirts from Charvet of Paris. Brian Lenihan died soon after.
 
#13
I think in fairness to Charlie, he was a modern day patriot, despite his own hunger for money and greatness. In the context of Irish Republicanism he wasn't all that bad.
 

Sixty

ADC
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#15
I thought he'd died years ago?






Why yes, that is my coat....
 
#16
Evereybody thought he'd died politically in the 70's but he came back.

Wasn't his Tanoiste Brian Lenehan also gobbed over remarks made on taped telephone conversations? Prior to that he was the prime candidate for the Presidency. The scandal over that created a new wave of revulsion over the way the Dail handled its business and let Mary Robinson in the door?
 
#17
GDav said:
I think in fairness to Charlie, he was a modern day patriot, despite his own hunger for money and greatness. In the context of Irish Republicanism he wasn't all that bad.
Irish Republicanism isnt the same Irish patriotism. He may have supported the republican movement but in doing so he was a traitor to the Irish people. After all the aims of the republican movement arent just to kick the Brits out, but to get rid of all democracy and instill themselves in power in a one-party state ruled by a state of fear, just like the taliban, and Castro, and Ceucescu and Stalin and Hitler, all those other "friends" of the republican movement.

1. He was a politician.
2. He was a crook.
3. he was a politician.

Wont be missed.
 
#18
I wonder why it is that that in Ireland, they have no equivalent of the Poll Tax or Council tax yet manage to support a well maintained level of local public service funded out of general taxation at a fraction of what we in the United Kingdom pay.

I ask only out of curiosity after reading Kevin Cahil's best selling text: "Who owns Britain"

I am of course willing to defer to anyone in this area.
 

Mr_Fingerz

LE
Book Reviewer
#19
Have you seen the state of the roads in Ireland's rural areas?
 
#20
Cuchulainn said:
GDav said:
I think in fairness to Charlie, he was a modern day patriot, despite his own hunger for money and greatness. In the context of Irish Republicanism he wasn't all that bad.
Irish Republicanism isnt the same Irish patriotism. He may have supported the republican movement but in doing so he was a traitor to the Irish people. After all the aims of the republican movement arent just to kick the Brits out, but to get rid of all democracy and instill themselves in power in a one-party state ruled by a state of fear, just like the taliban, and Castro, and Ceucescu and Stalin and Hitler, all those other "friends" of the republican movement.

1. He was a politician.
2. He was a crook.
3. he was a politician.

Wont be missed.

In my honest opinion; true Irish Republicanism is patriotism. There is nothing wrong with any citizen of Ireland yearning for a re-unification of the country. The term 'Republicanism' has become tainted by its misuse over the last few decades by a Marxist/Leninist organisation which has the very aims you have stated.

I think if Charlie had been around in 1916/18/21 his agenda would have suited Ireland better. Despite his mistakes I think he should be given credit for the good he did.

I agree he was an oul crook by the way. A likeable rogue. Do you remember the time the Royal Navy arrested him and impounded his yacht when he sailed up Carlingford Lough flying the Irish flag?

Modern politics is less interesting because there are no dodgy characters like Charlie in it LOL.

Bring back Phinner O'Toole is what I say. Best TD North Tipp ever had. :wink:
 
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