Changing styles of disaster reporting

ugly

LE
Moderator
#21
Not exactly current affairs, but worthy of analysis.

On 10 April 1968, the inter-island ferry, TEV Waihine rand aground in the entrance of Wellington Harbour, New Zealand. I remember it clearly, although I wasn't connected to it in any way, except for seeing it live on TV - well, as live as possible in 1968. Although living 400 miles north, we were sent home early from school as the storm was so severe, part of the roof had lifted of our building. At home (I walked home by myself in the storm - I was 6) my mother was glued to the TV watching events unfold. Little did I know, the father of a school friend was on the ship - but survived.

But what makes this interesting is the TV coverage: the reporter is calm, clipped, devoid of emotion, and thoroughly professional. The interviews of survivors, fresh from the lifeboats, are interesting, too. Stoic isn't strong enough description (especially the elegantly dressed old dear who had jumped two decks into the water)


I do wonder in these "wear your heart on your sleeve" and virtue-signalling days, how a disaster in full sight of the suburbs would be reported. Would they be interviewing counsellors who would speculate on how the survivors would cope? Would "experts" (a term I dread) being queuing up to give their opinions? Would the PM call for a day of mourning in a sombre TV broadcast and expect mounds of petrol station bouquets to mound up all over the place?
I passed a girl crying in her car because it was broken down, fecking wets
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#23
#24
Staggering by today's standards that not only was the next aircraft in the display cracking on through the sound barrier over the still smoking wreckage of the DH110, but the show opened as scheduled the next day too.
And the ATC cadets were dragooned into picking up the pieces, literally.

Surely nobody can agree that's good?

I hate today's hand wringing, but it may be better than decades of suffering in silence.
 
#25
I've posted this comparison somewhere before, but seems apt here too.

1984 Brighton bombing assassination attempt on Margaret Thatcher PM, kills 5 and injures 32.

The Conservative Party conference resumes that morning, with the PM delivering a solid speech.

2016 shooting of a minor Labour MP, who's name escapes me, and Parliament goes into meltdown.

An entire day in The Commons is dedicated to tributes to this tragic loss to humanity.

Heaven help us in the event of a real tragedy these days.
Regardless, her name should not 'escape' you - it weakens your argument massively.
 
#26
#27
Oh yes actually - a sitting MP being murdered by a right wing nutter is a big deal, regardless of views or party. If you think that such an act was not worthy of note then you need to get your head looked.
 
#29
And the ATC cadets were dragooned into picking up the pieces, literally.

Surely nobody can agree that's good?

I hate today's hand wringing, but it may be better than decades of suffering in silence.
Yeah. It's the same with health and safety: it's a pain in the neck but if it saves one life- which I guess it must have done by now- it's hard to argue against.
 
#30
Everyone would be crying and hugging making sure the cameras were on them whilst I would be hoping for a sleepy Scotsman in a bin lorry to wipe them out.
I passed a girl crying in her car because it was broken down, fecking wets
Are you good with colours or just indifferent to the fairer sex?
New car, tough shit moment
Unless you can contribute to the discussion sensibly and seriously, it might be better for you to exercise restraint.
Apologies.

Easy to forget where you're posting sometimes.
 
#32
I've posted this comparison somewhere before, but seems apt here too.

1984 Brighton bombing assassination attempt on Margaret Thatcher PM, kills 5 and injures 32.

The Conservative Party conference resumes that morning, with the PM delivering a solid speech.

2016 shooting of a minor Labour MP, who's name escapes me, and Parliament goes into meltdown.

An entire day in The Commons is dedicated to tributes to this tragic loss to humanity.

Heaven help us in the event of a real tragedy these days.
Thatcher's death would not have been a tragedy, except perhaps for her family.
 
#36
The turnout at her funeral gives the lie to that rather distasteful statement.
I was speculating the other day what would have happened if she had been killed...possible the Cold War would not have ended in the way it did. She was the one who established a rapport with Gorbachov and persuaded a rabidly skeptical Reagan to meet and engage with him. The rest, as they say, is history. But this is a thread drift.
 
#37
I was speculating the other day what would have happened if she had been killed...possible the Cold War would not have ended in the way it did. She was the one who established a rapport with Gorbachov and persuaded a rabidly skeptical Reagan to meet and engage with him. The rest, as they say, is history. But this is a thread drift.
She also was instrumental ( In Mandela's own words) in his release and ending apartheid - despite the current rewriting of history into she supported it.

How many lives did that save
 
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