"Changes needed to army training"

#6
charlotte-the-harlot said:
Yes I am a real Harlot and I apologise for repeating a thread....I shall punish myself severely!
I don't believe you.

We require live webcam footage, just to put our minds at rest :D
 
#9
I know I'm a complete numpty for repeating something already noted by my earstwhile colleague and if there are any volunteers to beast me I'm only too willing to be so punished!

Full exclusive web cam rights to the highest bidder!
 
#11
charlotte-the-harlot said:
I know I'm a complete numpty for repeating something already noted by my earstwhile colleague and if there are any volunteers to beast me I'm only too willing to be so punished!

Full exclusive web cam rights to the highest bidder!
5 quid.
 

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#16
Can I pay you in kind?
 
#19
"The word harlot nowadays refers to a particular kind of woman, but interestingly it used to refer to a particular kind of man. The word is first recorded in English in a work written around the beginning of the 13th century, meaning "a man of no fixed occupation, vagabond, beggar," and soon afterwards meant "male lecher." Already in the 14th century it appears as a deprecatory word for a woman, though exactly how this meaning developed from the male sense is not clear. For a time the word could also refer to a juggler or jester of either sex, but by the close of the 17th century its usage referring to males had disappeared."

So according to english lore....I could be a man! or a jester.....?
 
#20
charlotte-the-harlot said:
"The word harlot nowadays refers to a particular kind of woman, but interestingly it used to refer to a particular kind of man. The word is first recorded in English in a work written around the beginning of the 13th century, meaning "a man of no fixed occupation, vagabond, beggar," and soon afterwards meant "male lecher." Already in the 14th century it appears as a deprecatory word for a woman, though exactly how this meaning developed from the male sense is not clear. For a time the word could also refer to a juggler or jester of either sex, but by the close of the 17th century its usage referring to males had disappeared."

So according to english lore....I could be a man! or a jester.....?
either way I won, get them/it out.
 

Latest Threads

Top