Chain letter dismay?

Discussion in 'The Intelligence Cell' started by BoomShackerLacker, Sep 13, 2006.

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  1. One of my son's 'friends' is happily passing on these chain e-letters via email which are quite vile. Fortunately I intercepted it. Anybody else come across these 'nasties'? What's your best and wisest advice?

    Text below:


    wHEN U ALREADY START READING THIS DONT STOP OR ELSE SUMTHIN BAD WILL HAPPEN.... READ ON TO FIND OUT WHAT.... AND DONT TRY TO JUST DELETE THIS MESSAGE NOW CAUSE I ALREADY KNOW WHO YOU ARE AND WHERE YOU LIVE.... SO LET ME INTRODUCE MYSELF........... MY NAME IS SUMMER...I AM 15 YEARS OLD WITH BLONDE HAIR AND BLOOD SHOT EYES. I HAVE NO NOSE OR EARS. I AM DEAD. IF U DO NOT SEND THIS TO 15 PPL IN THE NEXT 5 MIN., I WILL APPEAR TONIGHT UNDER YOUR BED, YOU WILL HEAR ME.... AND SEE ME FOR ONLY A SECOND....... BUT WITH MY KNIFE..... I WILL KILL YOU. THIS IS NO JOKE.......... SOMETHING GOOD WILL HAPPEN TO U TONIGHT AT 10:22 IF YOU SEND THIS TO 15 PPL. SOMEONE WILL CALL U OR TALK TO U ONLINE AND SAY I LOVE U. DON'T FORWARD... COPY AND PASTE......... THIS IS NOT A JOKE

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  2. Inform your local police, and your ISP.
    They'll trace the little fkur and put a stop to his antics.

    Of course, the parents will claim that he was a victim of it, and is such a little angel. Aren't they all?
     
  3. Hide under his bed and then stab him ...that'll learn him.

    Seriously though what age are they both? They'd need to be fairly young to find that credible.
     

  4. Yeah, while you're at it tell 'em there's a street light out down your road and you think the local lollypop lady knocked off 2 mins early today.
     
  5. Almost as good as the "Copy and paste this or someone close to you will die", complete with "Case Studies" of where this has occured.

    Ask your son who sent it, and go around and fill the little fucker in :D
     
  6. Just delete the rubbish, I hate chain letters, chain e-mails, they are an insult to anyones intelligence. Delete it and forget it.
     
  7. Does telling someone that you know where they live and that you're going to kill them no longer count as a crime?
     
  8. Ah, the subtle approach! Both 13 Cut.

    Gullibility seems to be ageless though - just thought of Orson Welle's War of the Worlds radio programme that had Americans (Yes!) packing and leaving home:
    Orson Welles
     

  9. Yes it does, but then when you call them reporting a break in or an assault you'll know why they don't turn up straight away, 'cos people report stuff like this instead of taking a copy of the email around to the kids parents themselves or something equally as sensible.

    But no, report it to the police, then when they arrive tell them 'No, I don't want my kid to give a statement or go to court or anything that would actually help. Can't you just use your magical police powers to make the world a better place?'

    Deep breath and relax....
     
  10. It is a clear threat to kill and criminal designed to operate on a young mind and is intended to be believed and may, in fact be believed by it's recipient. Although I note you have intercepted it before he has had a chance to read it!

    It may also fall within Section 1 Malicious Communication Act 1988 punishable by a level four fine for an offence of sending letters, etc with intent to cause distress or anxiety.

    Moreover, a recently decided case under the Civil law gave an individual an actionable right to seek injunctive relief and damages for malicious communication placed on a chat room.

    In other words, the individual responsible may find himself guilty of one or more criminal offences and may well be held liable for the commission of a tort under the civil law. Criminal proceedings for which he is found guilty being admissible in evidence in the recovery of damages should the victim of it decide to take civil proceedings.

    Such nasties operate only on the mind, and may in some circumstances lead to psychological harm.

    Depending on the age and character of the recipient, they may be ignored and not passed on. However, It may be an idea to bring them to the attention of the Police where the recipient is young or vulnerable!

    As you are a parent with clear concerns for your son, and as you have described the sender as 'one of your son's friends' and thus presumably identifiable and a potential victim of an honestly held fear himself, my advice would be to report it to the Police!

    I personally believe that internet providers should be more pro-active in this area. You may wish to submit a complaint to them since the sender may well have contractually breached the conditions under which he is allowed to use it!

    I congratulate you for trying to responsibly draw the right balance between your son's privacy and exercising your duty of care as a parent. Not always an easy task!

    Good luck in whatever decision you take.

    Regards and best wishes
    Iolis
     
  11. Oh christ!

    Let's take a minute before we call in the Sweeney.

    As boomshackerlacker has already said one of his 'friends' is messing about with chain letter.

    To the ones screaming 'ring the police, ring the police' I hope you remember this when your kid's teacher rings to let you know your child has been locked up for assault after he/she pushed someone over in the playground.
     

  12. I don't think that informing the police would be the way forwards. I merely asked whether sending the e-mail was a crime, in the hope that someone (I say someone, I was hoping Iolis) would give me a nice long complicated answer.

    With respect to your last point, I'm 19. I'm hoping that by the time I've had kids this whole 'Suing everybody, everything is an infringement on my human rights' business will have blown over, and those in charge will be looking sheepishly at their feet trying to pretend the whole thing never happened.

    ....It could happen...
     
  13. I agree, calling the police seems to be a little far fetched, just delete any chain email you receive and forget about them, I do.
     
  14. Too, too funny.

    OK, responsible mode back on now...
     
  15. The information for which advice has been requested is not "Messing around with chain letters". "or pushing a kid over in the playground"

    The first paragraph of the post suggests a reqularity in a course of conduct which the poster as the custodian of the facts he discloses describes as 'vile' and from the available facts it may reasonably be inferred that others have been affected and who may not have been as fortunate to have had such mail intercepted.

    The decision whether or not to call in the Police will depend upon the nature of the communication sent' the regularity with which it engaged in and the effect upon the recipients of it!

    In other words, if if is regular, widespread and vile then it is right that the Police should be called and it would be wrong to trivialise it if such is the case!

    The decision to call the the Police will lie with the parent. The decision as to whether or not to investigate it will lie with the Police.