CH47 Wales 29 July

TamH70

MIA
So, what's the betting some cheeky sod is going to paint a Chinook kill symbol on the nearest power pylon?
 
I'm not an electrician but I gain the impression that wooden poles indicate 11kV or 33kV (I'm happy to be corrected). Either way, the poles are probably(?) less than 10m long, 2m of which is in the ground. In other words, to have cable scars across the windscreen, the aircraft must have been no more than 6m off the ground.

At least it wouldn't have far to fall.
I think this was being discussed over on PPRuNe yesterday, including someone who’d had a similar experience in NI.
 

Polyester

Old-Salt
I was on an exercise in Norway in 1999-2000 and the same pilot knackered two cabs in two days but it could be argued that neither was strictly his fault. His responsibility but not his fault. One, his aft rotors struck a cliff face and neatly whipped off 3” of each rotor blade and the other, landing in deep snow and striking the rear wheel (which is used for steering on the ground, we would turn it on a metal skid plate to shunt the helicopter about) and it bled out the No1 hydraulics system and destroyed the wheel. Had to land on a pike on sandbags. Absolutely mental but both helicopters were recovered, extra blokes flown out (including OC Eng) and loads of money spent on sorting them.

Great fun for us though.
 
However if the RAF do it they could could probably use it again as opposed to R.E.M.E delivering it straight to the local scrappy.
Grow old waiting for the RAF to shift it, More tea Cecil? Do you want a fairy cake with that Melvin? I didn’t much care for the curtains in the hotel last night! We can push this job out to the autumn David, think of the claims we can make. Ooo I say Cecil, I felt a spot of rain, best we call it a day! Shall we skip to dinner, or take a taxi?
 

ColdWarWorrier

Old-Salt
An acquaintance of mine used to be an RAF Jengo in NI and tells a dit about a Wessex that suffered a similar mishap. He was flown out in another Wessex to survey the damage and look at possibilities for recovery.

On arrival he noted that the only ‘damage’ was a few feet of cable wrapped around the rotor head. It was unwound and the Wessex was flown out.

There was no other damage or wire strike marks anywhere on the airframe. Bearing in mind the height off the ground of the Wessex’s rotor head and the average height of telegraph poles, it was concluded that the Wessex was flying very, very low at the time of impact.
 
An acquaintance of mine used to be an RAF Jengo in NI and tells a dit about a Wessex that suffered a similar mishap. He was flown out in another Wessex to survey the damage and look at possibilities for recovery.

On arrival he noted that the only ‘damage’ was a few feet of cable wrapped around the rotor head. It was unwound and the Wessex was flown out.

There was no other damage or wire strike marks anywhere on the airframe. Bearing in mind the height off the ground of the Wessex’s rotor head and the average height of telegraph poles, it was concluded that the Wessex was flying very, very low at the time of impact.
I imagine the circumstance are completely different! NI was, for want of a better phrase, a war zone, if the Wessex went down in bandit country it was probably safer to make an on the spot assessment, make a battle damage repair and get the hell out by air before you’re inundated with nasties. Fast forward to this incident and whilst the Welsh can be passionate and lively, they can’t be compared to the IRA! I’d be gobsmacked if that chinook flies out of Wales!
 

Mattb

LE
I must say that I was intrigued when I noticed the three lines of damage across the windscreen. My thoughts were "How did it manage to strike three cables and survive?"

Curiosity led me to look at the area on an on-line OS map. The nearest pylons are 5km south. The report didn't suggest that the Chinook struggled on for 3 miles so I headed for Streetview. Here I found that tbe overhead electricity supply is mounted on wooden poles.

I'm not an electrician but I gain the impression that wooden poles indicate 11kV or 33kV (I'm happy to be corrected). Either way, the poles are probably(?) less than 10m long, 2m of which is in the ground. In other words, to have cable scars across the windscreen, the aircraft must have been no more than 6m off the ground.

At least it wouldn't have far to fall.
I'd say that's correct, but if it was following a river, etc with significant sides it could potentially be rather higher.
 
And...?

The article pics show it sat on it's gear in reasonably long grass, shocks seemingly compressed normally. To a layman that looks like the result of a controlled landing or, at worse, a textbook controlled autorotate, not a "crash-landing."
Yup.

As a CH47 incident it still needs the RAF CFIT team to come out and hide the golf clubs and start spreading stories about FADEC runaways though...
 

wafubustard

War Hero
I seem to remember a CH53 load lifting a down-bird Chinook back to Bastion about10 years ago.
Are there any of them in the UK that we could borrow for a few hours.
Sadly I haven't find my pictures of that.
 
It's not a good advert for the RAF if they can't conduct a field repair and fly it home.
 

wafubustard

War Hero
We do still repair cabs in the field if it is possible. Sometimes it isn't possible to get the cab anywhere elseEngine changes were common place.
Things like windscreens can be more difficult due to needing curing time and possible controlled temperatures .
I have been away from aircraft for 4 years now so may be out of date.
 

Mattb

LE
I seem to remember a CH53 load lifting a down-bird Chinook back to Bastion about10 years ago.
Are there any of them in the UK that we could borrow for a few hours.
Sadly I haven't find my pictures of that.
Unlikely, the USAF don't use them any more.
 
You are just looking for something in the pictures I posted that’s not there. Considering I’m a serving officer, not aircrew, I’m no expert however please point out the parts of my post I criticise.
Didn’t know Mickey D’s had officers. Every day etc.
 
I imagine the circumstance are completely different! NI was, for want of a better phrase, a war zone, if the Wessex went down in bandit country it was probably safer to make an on the spot assessment, make a battle damage repair and get the hell out by air before you’re inundated with nasties. Fast forward to this incident and whilst the Welsh can be passionate and lively, they can’t be compared to the IRA! I’d be gobsmacked if that chinook flies out of Wales!
By a holiday cottage in Wales, and come home to a real fire!
 

jg505

Old-Salt
An acquaintance of mine used to be an RAF Jengo in NI and tells a dit about a Wessex that suffered a similar mishap. He was flown out in another Wessex to survey the damage and look at possibilities for recovery.

On arrival he noted that the only ‘damage’ was a few feet of cable wrapped around the rotor head. It was unwound and the Wessex was flown out.

There was no other damage or wire strike marks anywhere on the airframe. Bearing in mind the height off the ground of the Wessex’s rotor head and the average height of telegraph poles, it was concluded that the Wessex was flying very, very low at the time of impact.
I might actually know that J Eng O.

Here's XV719 - 'Bravo' after coming into difficulties at Bishops Court, early 1990 (I'd just left the Sqn).

My mate was one of the team that went to recover what was left of it. Fortunately, no one died but I believe the ALM was seriously injured.

XV719.jpg
 

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