CH47 Wales 29 July

japseyewarrior

Old-Salt
Just Googled the gross weight of a Chinook, and Googled it's lifting capacity.
Seems to be a 5,000 kilo difference.....happy to be corrected.
Just wondered if...they could whip out the engines etc till it balanced out.
I know the square root of F all about it mind.
Yeah they don’t lift it as a oner, nothing worse than an under slung load that wants to fly as soon as you put an airflow over an aerofoil.
 

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japseyewarrior

Old-Salt
How to remove it? Thought that would be obvious from the outset, blades off, stowed inside, craned airframe onto a loadloader, then off to England for accident investigation?
Depends on access. One down bird couldn’t be low loaded out due to access to the field (slight incline to get to the field and day 2 at the Somme conditions under foot plus domestics crossing the lane leading up to the field).
 
Depends on access. One down bird couldn’t be low loaded out due to access to the field (slight incline to get to the field and day 2 at the Somme conditions under foot plus domestics crossing the lane leading up to the field).
Might be a field too far for the RAF, REME reccy mech would have it out the field and on a lowloader, job jobbed
As for the gradient of the field, that’s what a MAN winch is for on the Recca
 

ericferret

War Hero
Might be a field too far for the RAF, REME reccy mech would have it out the field and on a lowloader, job jobbed
As for the gradient of the field, that’s what a MAN winch is for on the Recca
However if the RAF do it they could could probably use it again as opposed to R.E.M.E delivering it straight to the local scrappy.
 
How to remove it? Thought that would be obvious from the outset, blades off, stowed inside, craned airframe onto a lowloader, then off to England for accident investigation?
Another Chinny.
 
Actually, come to think of it I'm surprised that electricity could be found that deep in to Wales.
Well, judging by the pictures it probably can't now.
 

NSP

LE
Don't look very crashed to me. Looks more, "Whoa! What was that bang? Oops - lights on the master warning panel and alarms and shit. That field there looks suitable; we'll pop it down and check it out before we go any further."

However, I wasn't there, I'm not a pilot and I'm not even in the AAAIB*.



* ArRSe Air Accident Speculation Investigation Bureau.
 
How to remove it? Thought that would be obvious from the outset, blades off, stowed inside, craned airframe onto a lowloader, then off to England for accident investigation?
Fill it with a bag of helium then lift it with an (the) Airlander 10.
 

ericferret

War Hero
Don't look very crashed to me. Looks more, "Whoa! What was that bang? Oops - lights on the master warning panel and alarms and shit. That field there looks suitable; we'll pop it down and check it out before we go any further."

However, I wasn't there, I'm not a pilot and I'm not even in the AAAIB*.



* ArRSe Air Accident Speculation Investigation Bureau.
Probably not, but still little change from £150k
 

NSP

LE

NSP

LE
And...?

The article pics show it sat on it's gear in reasonably long grass, shocks seemingly compressed normally. To a layman that looks like the result of a controlled landing or, at worse, a textbook controlled autorotate, not a "crash-landing."
Where did I say it crash landed, all I posted are pictures of the airframe considerably prior to its accident.

You are just looking for something in the pictures I posted that’s not there. Considering I’m a serving officer, not aircrew, I’m no expert however please point out the parts of my post I criticise.
 
I must say that I was intrigued when I noticed the three lines of damage across the windscreen. My thoughts were "How did it manage to strike three cables and survive?"

Curiosity led me to look at the area on an on-line OS map. The nearest pylons are 5km south. The report didn't suggest that the Chinook struggled on for 3 miles so I headed for Streetview. Here I found that tbe overhead electricity supply is mounted on wooden poles.

I'm not an electrician but I gain the impression that wooden poles indicate 11kV or 33kV (I'm happy to be corrected). Either way, the poles are probably(?) less than 10m long, 2m of which is in the ground. In other words, to have cable scars across the windscreen, the aircraft must have been no more than 6m off the ground.

At least it wouldn't have far to fall.
 

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