Ceasefire 14th June 1982

Discussion in 'Military History and Militaria' started by Radical_Dreamer, Jun 14, 2006.

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  1. 24 years today since the ceasefire. RIP to all who died in that conflict. A day to remember. Next year is the big one.


    Of course the Argies still want it "back"
     
  2. Amen to that. I remember it well - is it really nearly a quarter of a century?
     
  3. I remember it as though it was just yesterday. Time flies, however at least I am here to ruminate over the past. RIP to those that did not make it.


    fastmedic
     
  4. Have been hearing that it is actually going to be very big.
    An effort, allegedly, to shift the focus of rememberance away from the World Wars and onto more recent conflicts, and their fallen/veterans.
     
  5. Definitely a day to remember.

    And a day to remember those who sadly lost their lives.

    RIP
     
  6. some remember a lot more than we want to,as with all conflicts/wars etc it never ends just because of a ceasefire date.

    for those that have fallen,RIP fellas, for those who are still fighting, your not alone
     
  7. The invasion and the start of the subsequent Conflict came just before my 8th birthday and it was the first time I realised what war was: I remember seeing footage of the Task Force setting sail, the news reports from the field and hearing daily about the tragic loss of life.

    To all those who fell, Rest In Peace; to those who lost loved ones and to those who made it back, my thoughts are with you.
     
  8. Let`s hope it compliments, rather than downgrades, Remembrance Sunday, unlike Brown`s Veterans` Day bollox.
     
  9. I will today be paying homage to all involved in the conflict.

    The Falklands war: a pivotal moment in my young life, defining who I was and still am today. I can recall it all as though it were only yesterday: the Task Force departing; devouring every scrap of news I could find, my pride and reverence at the bravery, fortitude and professionalism of our Armed Forces, the unswerving belief that victory will be ours...... and the tears I shed for our fallen.

    The powerful image of the Para tabbing away from camera with the Union Flag on his bergen is forever embedded in my mind.

    Curiously unplanned to coincide with the anniversary my current read is "Razor's Edge: The Unofficial History of the Falklands War" by Hugh Bicheno. I'm not yet very far into it but already it's a very interesting perspective.

    Edited for Wednesday (everyday?) mongyness.
     
  10. Hard to believe its been 24 years. Like many teenagers at the time I suddenly realised that there was more to life than stacking shelves in Tesco's. National Pride was on a high and prompted me to don the green suit.

    For those who made it and those who didn't I shall certainly be raising a glass or two of port in memory.
     
  11. Hard to believe its been 24 years. Like many teenagers at the time I suddenly realised that there was more to life than stacking shelves in Tesco's. National Pride was on a high and prompted me to don the green suit.

    For those who made it and those who didn't I shall certainly be raising a glass or two of port in memory.
     
  12. The Falklands I find rather interesting.

    With anywere in the World were there is contention the British governments
    tend to resolve by way of hand overs or joint control.

    This is not the case in the Falklands.

    So it poses a question, what is down there.

    Valuable minerals, oil, gas, something else ?

    Maybe I just have nothing.


    But anyway who's complaining Keep the Argy's out. :eek:
     
  13. Difference is ALL the Falklander Islanders want to be British citizens, that has not ben the case in other areas you are alouding too - and in particular, to your own part of the world.