cdt

#2
Being discharged for drug abuse hardly constitutes a good service history does it? However, policy has changed slightly regarding retention of low level users and soldiering ability but I doubt that this will enable those discharged to re - enlist. Whilst being unaware of the exact circumstances of your drug use, I'm reluctant to condemn you out of hand but, you knew the rules, you knew the reason for the rules and you effectively put your own pleasure ahead of the lives of your colleagues. Would you want to be on patrol with a pot head?
 
#4
No, but put simplistically one is abusing a legal substance while the other is abusing an illegal substance. It doesn't stop the fact that you wouldn't be on patrol with either.
 
#5
No you wouldn't want to be on patrol with either, the difference being that drugs cause all sorts of long term and permanent mental problems, even if the soldier concerned hasn't used drugs the night before the effects could still be there, reaction times slowed, paranoia etc, not to mention the propensity for thieving amongst drug users.
I'm willing to accept that in certain cases some soldiers are worth salvaging if possible especially if behaving out of character due legitimate and well researched reasons. What we can't tolerate is those that pop pills and smoke dope as part of their normal conduct. They are also contributing to the finances of our enemies.
I'm really not sure about re-enlisting those already discharged even with strong supporting circumstances. Thoughts anyone?
 
#7
The legality or illegality of something is decided by politicians that are just as fallible as us. My point is do not dismiss alcohol abuse as minor compared to use of cannabis simply on its legal status, dont forget that cannabis is perfectly legal in Holland! It is true that the long term effects of regular cannabis are not known but many people each year suffer as a result of alcohol abuse. That could range from some drunken knob head in the Naafi giving you some grief to cirrhosis of the liver, either way, the abuse of any substance is reason for concern and should not be tolerated by any member of the forces, help should be made available for those with a genuine problem but repeat offenders do not warrant the effort.
As for getting a second chance, i believe it should be done on a case by case basis with tight restrictions placed on any soldier/officer for a period of time that does get re-admitted, after this period of probation it should remain on their record as a reference to frame their future improvements/failures.

ive been on ARRSE for so long ive finally become opinionated enough to sit here and type that out! bugger...
 
#8
I will play devils advocate slightly here and state that it isn't just about illegality, its also about culture. Whether you agree with it or not, alcohol is an integral part of army culture, it is an important part of team bonding and military life. Used properly and responsibly and there is every reason to believe that it is a good thing for morale. If someone developes an alcohol problem then they should be disciplined or if appropriate treated and in fact their is a system in place for this. Put it another way, if there were a blanket ban on alcohol what effect do you think it would have on morale?
Drugs on the other hand are linked to terrorism, are not part of the army culture and most soldiers hold drug users in contempt. Drugs are divisive, are proven to cause serious psychological and physical problems even in low use and therefore cannot be compared to low use of alcohol which has proven health benefits.
As I stated before, we know what the rules are so you take your drugs, you take your chances.
 
#9
The availablity of a substance isnt really the issue, its the responsible use of it by soldiers which can only be achieved by educating them about it. i fully agree with you on the drugs front though, you know the risks you take and you can deal with the consequences, but as my mum said once, "its only illegal if you get caught"!
 
#10
Warrior_Poet said:
I will play devils advocate slightly here and state that it isn't just about illegality, its also about culture. Whether you agree with it or not, alcohol is an integral part of army culture, it is an important part of team bonding and military life. Used properly and responsibly and there is every reason to believe that it is a good thing for morale. If someone developes an alcohol problem then they should be disciplined or if appropriate treated and in fact their is a system in place for this. Put it another way, if there were a blanket ban on alcohol what effect do you think it would have on morale?
Drugs on the other hand are linked to terrorism, are not part of the army culture and most soldiers hold drug users in contempt. Drugs are divisive, are proven to cause serious psychological and physical problems even in low use and therefore cannot be compared to low use of alcohol which has proven health benefits.
As I stated before, we know what the rules are so you take your drugs, you take your chances.
In my Sqn, every weekend without fail, at least one person used to end up with a smack, due to everybody being drunk - but it was always kept in house.

Alcohol is also linked to causing psychiatric and physical problems. Really, I cannot see the difference between cannabis or alcohole. Infact, after losing three members of my family to alcohole abuse, inluding watching one die in hospital (plus however many distant relative on the Irish side), I actually consider canabis to be the lesser of the two evils.
 
#11
Isn't the rule now if you fail a CDT that instead of kickked out you get councilling ? Dependent of the drug of course


Quite a while ago (a good 8 to 10 years) my BSM held a parade of new members, there was about 10 of them, and asked them candidly if they had ever taken drugs. They all put their hands up. My flustered BSM then announced "Well, err, never do it again" and fell them out
 
#12
Warrior_Poet said:
What we can't tolerate is those that pop pills and smoke dope as part of their normal conduct. They are also contributing to the finances of our enemies.
I thought the Dutch were on our side? :D

No-one here is coming out with anything stupid but realistically the odd smoke is unlikely to do too much harm - all things in moderation etc. It's not "Reefer Madness".
 
#13
amazing__lobster said:
In my Sqn, every weekend without fail, at least one person used to end up with a smack, due to everybody being drunk - but it was always kept in house.

Alcohol is also linked to causing psychiatric and physical problems. Really, I cannot see the difference between cannabis or alcohole. Infact, after losing three members of my family to alcohole abuse, inluding watching one die in hospital (plus however many distant relative on the Irish side), I actually consider canabis to be the lesser of the two evils.
Whichever way you look at it and for whatever reasons - One is legal, the other is illegal.
 
#14
Realistically the odd smoke as a rule WILL do them great physical harm, especially if I ever caught them spliffing up. The choice is simple, you can be a professional soldier, or you can be a drug user... you cannot by be both. If you want to use illegal substances then feck off out onto civvy street with the rest of the scrotes and let us get on with the job.
 
#15
AF1771 said:
amazing__lobster said:
In my Sqn, every weekend without fail, at least one person used to end up with a smack, due to everybody being drunk - but it was always kept in house.

Alcohol is also linked to causing psychiatric and physical problems. Really, I cannot see the difference between cannabis or alcohole. Infact, after losing three members of my family to alcohole abuse, inluding watching one die in hospital (plus however many distant relative on the Irish side), I actually consider canabis to be the lesser of the two evils.
Whichever way you look at it and for whatever reasons - One is legal, the other is illegal.
Never speed do you?
 
#16
To answer the question as it was asked:

No, generally if one is administratively discharged following a failed CDT, re-enlistment is not an option. However, these things are not written in stone. Soldiers from pinch-point trades with current or improved skills might well be allowed to re-enlist after a period (usually not less than 18 months) if they have acquired no further black marks in the interim. They will still be subject to individual re-test (i.e. the team turn up on the doorstep and say "Pte Bloggs, p*ss here please") for five years from the date of their first failure, though.

IF
 
#18
The vast majority are class B's with only a very small number of Class A drugs. (Less than 5% of positive tests I'm led to believe) don't quote me on that though as its anecdotal evidence from my last CDT!
 
T

taric

Guest
#19
I'm a former soldier in the process of re-enlistment after recieving discharge after being sent to prison for GBH and my CO's on side but we'll have to see and i can say that if allowances have been made there then you never know second chances ooooooh!!!!!!!!!
 
#20
Actually, the vast majority of positives test positive for cannabis, which is a Class C drug. Just as a point of interest, as an Adjt I had five positives in two years: three cannabis, one heroin and one with an interesting cocktail of crack and amphetamines in her bloodstream.

IF
 
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
msr Army Pay, Claims & JPA 20
C The Intelligence Cell 51
E ARRSE: Site Issues 2

Similar threads

New Posts

Latest Threads

Top