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CDT Process

WhizKid89

Swinger
Please excuse if this is posted in the incorrect sub-forum, I am not military and your lingo is somewhat confusing in aiding me posting in the relevant place...

I am currently writing a research paper as a part of my PhD in chemistry. One of the subjects is workplace drug testing. As you all know the MoD is arguably the biggest contributor in terms of funding to this process, I am referring to your infamous CDT teams.

It is common knowledge that LGC labs are the contractor responsible for the MoD's collation and initial immunoassay screenings of samples collected by your different units, I, of course, understand in depth the process of testing, and some of the published studies in regards to administrative discharges within the armed forces simply do not sit right with me when I correlate the numbers alongside data with the lab studies themselves.

One year, and I am paraphrasing, I believe I saw 400 soldiers were caught for cocaine misuse on a CDT. This seems unprecedented considering soldiers by nature and career take calculated risks... Even the most sensitive immunoassay screenings with a cut off point of 15ng as opposed to the industry standard 150/300ng tests struggle to detect cocaine and metabolites thereof, after 96 hours!

Why does this shock me?

It makes me believe that soldiers are still using cocaine on a Friday or Saturday evening even though they surely must expect that if the army had any sense a test would be viable on a Monday. I just struggle to believe members of our armed forces are that silly!

Is this indication of a vast drug epidemic within the armed forces?
 

184461

*Russian Troll*
be under no illusions, I haven't met many people who have gotten past year one in uni who haven't partaken in some independent studies on this matter. This is I'm sure extended to your hierarchy!
Not wrong.
The army ran on booze when I was in.
Cheap and plentiful.
That's the acceptable drug as opposed to unacceptable drugs.
These days with all the synthetics etc it has to be much worse.
Generations change and the services have to move with their 'employees'.

 

WhizKid89

Swinger
Not wrong.
The army ran on booze when I was there.
That's the acceptable drug as opposed to unacceptable drugs.

I am not here to highlight the hypocrisy of military policy and attitude to drug use. Although having read through some of the archaic opinions on this forum and that of your little sisters, the Navy, I'm sure I could say a lot. Both from a scientific viewpoint and a moral one.

Safe to say, the law is indeed, an Ass.
 
Two points.

Firstly, those whose samples are not completely above suspicion (not an out and out fail, but in some way out of the ordinary) are subject to non-random retesting. Anyone who has a second test which is in some respect unusual is liable to be administratively discharged. This can include samples which are too dilute due to the subject drinking a vast amount of water in an effort to mask the sample.

Secondly, the coke users I know who have been caught have generally been midweek, it seems that they become blasé.
 
The table I was referencing was a single year and a single service. The Army.

The limitations of testing and the numbers caught are frankly staggering.
You think that the use of the word "random" means that particular units aren't targeted at specific times?
 
Despite what we’d all like to believe, in some units (particularly infantry from the things I hear) a lot of the young lads think it’s absolutely fine to do cocaine on the weekends. And in the week come to that
 
Are soldiers silly? I'd be surprised it it wasn't the exact opposite.

Many youngsters who for one reason or another want out of the Army, and if they are contracted to 4 years, the quickest way out is through a CDT failure, so I would argue that many of the 400 you talk about were deliberately taking drugs in the hope of being caught and discharged, a bit extreme, yes, but I would suggest that this at least blurs the figures, if not directly affects them.

MB
 

WhizKid89

Swinger
Two points.

Firstly, those whose samples are not completely above suspicion (not an out and out fail, but in some way out of the ordinary) are subject to non-random retesting. Anyone who has a second test which is in some respect unusual is liable to be administratively discharged. This can include samples which are too dilute due to the subject drinking a vast amount of water in an effort to mask the sample.

Secondly, the coke users I know who have been caught have generally been midweek, it seems that they become blasé.

Very interesting, so casual drug use extends into Sundays and even working days.

As for targetted testing using a GC MS Confirmatory test is standard practice in labs I've trained in.

Over-diluting would usually prompt such a confirmatory test.
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
The table I was referencing was a single year and a single service. The Army.

The limitations of testing and the numbers caught are frankly staggering.

what is the equivalent percentage in the same age range in civi life? oh we don't know as only a tiny fraction of them are tested.

I was involved in a the testing process a while ago - certain people were 'randomly' chosen as there was good reason to test them above others in the Regiment.

Every recruit is tested at least once in basic training - it was normally in the first few days of arrival. It wasn't uncommon at all to get admissions of various recreational drugs being used, some tried to bluff their way through it.
One lad had his 'mates' write a letter confessing that they had fed him hash cakes without his knowledge. He was retained but was under no illusion as to where he'd be going if he delivered a positive sample again.
 
Although having read through some of the archaic opinions on this forum and that of your little sisters, the Navy, I'm sure I could say a lot. Both from a scientific viewpoint and a moral one.
I would hope that your scientific viewpoint would tale cognisance of the facts that the average ARRSEr is a civilian in his 60s.
 
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