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CCRF & the RFA

chrisg46

LE
Book Reviewer
#1
Apologies in advance if this has been posted before, a very quick search did not find any.

Has anyone got a link for documentation for the short term call out the CCRF would undergo? My work seem to think that it would be the same as a normal TA camp and as such would come out of my annual leave. I have told them otherwise, but would need paper evidence to back this up.
 
#3
Are you on High Readiness Reserve?

If not a short term call out will need the consent of your employer (and you will need to take it out of your leave entitlement if your boss wishes you to do so)
 
#4
I may be wrong, but when you first joined the CCRF your unit/SABRE should have contacted your empolyer to advise that you were a member of the CCRF and as such could be called up at sort notice.

I also beleive that if the CCRF were to be called up, under an act of parliment in RFA 96, then you would be subject to a call-up the same as to go on ops, all be it with a very short notice period.

As the RFA 96 is used for this purpose it would protect your employment and mean that you do not need to take leave for it. Also, as in a Operational call out your empolyer would have the right to block your deployment. Unfortunatly, I do not know the Act in sufficient detail to advise much further though if you check the MOD or Gov't websites then you should find the info required.

C
 
#7
SABRE Web Site said:
High Readiness Reservists (HRRs) have specific skills which the Armed Forces may need, but which are only required occasionally. They volunteer for High Readiness status and can be deployed at short notice. If an HRR has a regular job and works more than two days per week, they will require the written consent of their employer to hold HRR status. This consent takes the form of an agreement that is renewed annually. In the event of mobilisation, an HRR can be asked to serve for up to nine months.

SABRE said:
Members of the four Volunteer Reserve Forces may also volunteer to join one of the Civil Contingency Reaction Forces (CCRF) that exist to provide support for the civil authorities in the event of extreme national need, such as a natural disaster or terrorist attack. They receive special training and may be called up for service at very short notice.
 
#8
In (very) short summary:

CCRF is mobilised via Rapid Compulsory Mobilisation (RCM).
Employers have the right to appeal against the mobilisation and their appeal is put before an Adjudication Officer.

It is not the same as Annual Camp/ATP.

Your PSAO/AO SHOULD be an expert in RCM.
 
#9
nitv9 said:
CCRF is mobilised via Rapid Compulsory Mobilisation (RCM).
Employers have the right to appeal against the mobilisation and their appeal is put before an Adjudication Officer.
Under what part of RFA96? If we were liable for RCM then surely the measures stated for HRR would have been implemented (i.e. my employer would have informed of my commitment)
 
#10
polar said:
Under what part of RFA96? If we were liable for RCM then surely the measures stated for HRR would have been implemented (i.e. my employer would have informed of my commitment)
For LONDONS (not sure about other Regts) we have a CCRF commitment but we don't have any HRR - so I don't think there is any linkage between CCRF/RCM and HRR.
 
#11
nitv9 said:
For LONDONS (not sure about other Regts) we have a CCRF commitment but we don't have any HRR - so I don't think there is any linkage between CCRF/RCM and HRR.
HRR was a 2 Sig Bde thing to cover calling up soldiers over low-medium scale disasters, I believe CCRF/RCM is covered by RFA 96 but does not include these floods.

What do I know anyway, I reckon these floods warrant call-out under RFA 96 (it is a natural disaster) but Telic/Fingall doesn't (its not a humanitarian operation, well Iraq was in the 90's but media isn't on that angle now).

Dr Evil please cast put your minions onto deciphering this cryptic document
 
#12
COS1SigBde said:
CCRF - ha ha ha ha ha ha ha
Can only agree! Why bother caring about CCRF call outs? The last few years have shown they will never use it despite several civil emergencies happening (London bombings, floodings (twice), foot and mouth - so far long ago I can't remember if it was set up in time for that!). The media may have latched onto the fact that the army is there, but it is only the odd unit, not the CCRF.
 
#13
MightyBigEgo said:
The last few years have shown they will never use it despite several civil emergencies happening (London bombings, floodings (twice), foot and mouth - so far long ago I can't remember if it was set up in time for that!).
All untrue (unless you only mean the inf bn part of the CCRF)
 
#14
RCM does what it says on the tin - it's a procedure for mobilising members of the Reserves quickly at TA centres without the need to go to RTMC Chilwell or similar.

It shouldn't be confused with the legislation which ALLOWS the call out in the first place. I'd look the details for mobilisation in the case of emergency in the UK up in RFA96 but really can't be arrsed.

Use of CCRF in the London bombings was always going to be highly unlikely as by the time mobilsation had happened CIVPOL et al were already onto the investigative phase.

IIRC there is a considerable period between a call out happening and even the CCRF lead elements being in FOBs - we are talking days for a CCRF to be operational.

As Units are so short of kit the very best we are likely to be able to supply is manpower to stag on cordons (with no actual powers of a Constable - although the option of making CCRF troops Specials was considered) and filling sandbags.

This is not a cynic's response, just a realistic one gained having talked to the emergency services and local authorities about what CCRF could bring to the "party".
 
#15
I think the position is accurately and concisely stated by our learned chums at SaBRE:

SaBRE website said:
The Civil Contingency Reaction Forces (CCRF) can be called up at very short notice, as little as 24 hours, but would only be mobilised for a relatively short period of time, probably no more than a couple of days.

The authority for call-out of CCRFs is contained in the Reserve Forces Act 1996, which requires ministerial agreement before taking place. The rights of employers to claim financial assistance or apply for exemption are unaltered.

Given that the notice of call-out would be exceptionally short, members of CCRFs are expected to inform their employers in advance about this liability for call-out. As CCRFs would only be used in times of civil emergency, it is hoped that employers will be sympathetic towards any mobilisation as it will be directly supporting the welfare of the community.
The floods are definitely a "civil emergency" enabling mobilisation under RFA.

Note that (in theory, anyway), any member of the TA could be mobilised to help out in a civil emergency. You don't have to be a member of the HRR or CCRF to be mobilisable under the Act. Having said that, the powers that be would use CCRF bods first, I'd imagine.

So, to answer chrisg46's questions:

1. The best people to talk to about this are SaBRE.

2. Refer your employers to http://www.sabre.mod.uk/output/page32.asp and also give them the SaBRE phone number.

3. You (and any other serving member of a reserve force) could be mobilised to help out in this civil emergency under s. 52 or 56 of the RFA96, whether or not you are CCRF or HRR or generic TA bod. Anyone who is a "member of a reserve force" may be called out under that section "if it appears to [Her Majesty] that national danger is imminent or that a great emergency has arisen" (s. 52(1)(a)) or "if it appears to [the Secretary of State] that it is necessary or desirable to use armed forces on operations anywhere in the world for the alleviation of distress or the preservation of life or property in time of disaster or apprehended disaster" (s. 56(1)(b)).

4. If so, your employer could appeal against your mobilisation. However, see the last paragraph of the quote from SaBRE and my paragraph 8 below.

5. Your employment when mobilised is protected* by law.

6. Your time spent when mobilised is not to be taken out of your leave. It is a period of whole-time service for another employer which statute obliges you to perform.

7. If it helps your employer's payroll system to compute what is going on, ask them to treat it as a period of unpaid leave for the purposes of the computer system. But make clear to them that if called up you are obliged to go: it is not to be treated as a request for unpaid leave.

8. Give your HR tossers a poke in the eye from me. It's a fcking civil emergency. I hear two prem babies died as a result of the floods, so it's a serious business. What if your presence on the scene saves - I dunno - some old dear who can't make it up the stairs? Fcking HR tw@ts.



* cough
 
#16
cheers Dr Evil, I was hoping you'd comment on this topic.

So it seems the capability was their just not the cash (as indicated in several other threads)
 

OldSnowy

LE
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#18
Capability? What capability? Given that CCRFs are intended to provide general duties support but not specialist skills, I suppose lack of plant and vehicles won't be a problem, but they are still painfully slow to deploy. If you want a Command Team within six hours, around 100 troops within 24 hours, and another 300 or so sometime later, then CCRF is for you. CCRFs are on 24hrs NTM, and that's probably pushing it.

Perhaps one day all will be revealed regarding the origins of the CCRF, but suffice it to say that it was never intended as the answer to any genuine problem, but was invented for entirely other reasons (*Cough* See: Infantry, whinging, GS for the use of).

HRR is one thing, and is usable, CCRF is another, and is pretty much utterly useless.

Oh, and RFA96 covers CCRF quite happily - any call-out would be under Sect 56.
 
#19
Armed Forces minister Bob Ainsworth managed to dispel any impression that the military lacked the ability to respond to national emergencies this morning on the Toady programme*. He said there was no need for a formed and organised body of soldiers dedicated to support to the emergency services - so obviously no one has briefed him on the existance of the CCRF during his month in office.



*He also managed to complete the whole interview without pronouncin' his 'ngs' which was really gettin' on my tits by the end - pikey git!
 
#20
BS,

That may be because it doesn't actually 'exist'. It is merely an illusion created by some powerpoint presentations, a few forms and the occasional CPX.

msr
 

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