Cauld Blasts and Clishmaclavers

Cauld Blasts and Clishmaclavers

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
They speak in ridles north beyond the Tweed,
The plain, pure English they can deftly read;
Yet when without the book they come to speak,
Their lingo seems half English half Greek.

Robert Leighton 1869.

Not the normal fare for this website but a handy book nonetheless, especially if those south of the Border are thinking of having a staycation in Scotland this year.

The book is as it says, just a lovely treasury of Scots words using the various dialects and languages from around...

Click here to read the full review.....
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
I am sure that this is a book that @Grumblegrunt would appreciate - he certainly could use it to understand the patois of God's Country!
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Bravo Auld Yin - stand up for your native patois, by all means. :)

Slightly off-topic - do any of our resident porridge-wogs have a complete lyric for the pre-Boer War Glaswegian plain song:

' Wha saw the Tattie Howkers
Sailin' doon the Broomielaw? '


Ta.
 
Bravo Auld Yin - stand up for your native patois, by all means. :)

Slightly off-topic - do any of our resident porridge-wogs have a complete lyric for the pre-Boer War Glaswegian plain song:

' Wha saw the Tattie Howkers
Sailin' doon the Broomielaw? '


Ta.
 
Fit's this aa aboot en?
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Big Rob Anyone
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Bravo Auld Yin - stand up for your native patois, by all means. :)

Slightly off-topic - do any of our resident porridge-wogs have a complete lyric for the pre-Boer War Glaswegian plain song:

' Wha saw the Tattie Howkers
Sailin' doon the Broomielaw? '


Ta.
Here is a link to the lyrics and some background to the song, in its many forms

 
I had a bunch of Glaswegian mates (in West London). Their attempts at Betty's English were a constant source of wonder and bewilderment.

Things I remember:

1) One of them attempting to brush something off your shoulder "you've got opdockie on your jacket". Me: "whats opdockie". Them all doing fey limpwristed camp hand on hip other hand waving Larry Grayson gestures saying "ooooh get you". This apparently passes for humour north of the Ice Wall.

2) Showing me a piece of paper with They War is Tied written on it and asking me what it meant. "Nothing, its gibberish. You tell me what it means". "It means the wall is tiled". Yeah, of course it does.

3) The only joke in Scotland. Dog ugly woman goes to plastic surgeon for facial cosmetic surgery.
Surgeon: "Do you have anyone in mind as a template for me to work to".
Woman: "Oh aye. I want to look like Sarah Pippilini".
Surgeon: "I'm afraid I don't know who that is".
Woman: "Well you must do. Sarah Pippilini has been in all the papers this week"
Surgeon: "Sadly not in the Times madam"
(Cut shaggy dog story short)​
Woman: "Well I want to look like Sarah Pippilini"
Surgeon: "Perhaps you could show me the article in the paper madam"
Woman: "I have it here" as she takes cutting from paper out of handbag.







Which reads SAHARA PIPELINE: Laid by 400 men in two weeks.
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
I am sure that this is a book that @Grumblegrunt would appreciate - he certainly could use it to understand the patois of God's Country!
I'm in Yorkshire already and understand everyone perfectly well.

and shouldn't that be gods semi autonomous region? although I'm not sure which god would want it, Herne the Hunted maybe or OM.

I mean its not exactly going to inspire Greek gods is it, unless they have fleece lined goretex Togas.

I'm not sure scotland even has a patois - a patina definately - algae and rust mainly.

And that obsession with Jewish poetry is just wierd.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
I had a bunch of Glaswegian mates (in West London). Their attempts at Betty's English were a constant source of wonder and bewilderment.

Things I remember:

1) One of them attempting to brush something off your shoulder "you've got opdockie on your jacket". Me: "whats opdockie". Them all doing fey limpwristed camp hand on hip other hand waving Larry Grayson gestures saying "ooooh get you". This apparently passes for humour north of the Ice Wall.

2) Showing me a piece of paper with They War is Tied written on it and asking me what it meant. "Nothing, its gibberish. You tell me what it means". "It means the wall is tiled". Yeah, of course it does.

3) The only joke in Scotland. Dog ugly woman goes to plastic surgeon for facial cosmetic surgery.
Surgeon: "Do you have anyone in mind as a template for me to work to".
Woman: "Oh aye. I want to look like Sarah Pippilini".
Surgeon: "I'm afraid I don't know who that is".
Woman: "Well you must do. Sarah Pippilini has been in all the papers this week"
Surgeon: "Sadly not in the Times madam"
(Cut shaggy dog story short)​
Woman: "Well I want to look like Sarah Pippilini"
Surgeon: "Perhaps you could show me the article in the paper madam"
Woman: "I have it here" as she takes cutting from paper out of handbag.







Which reads SAHARA PIPELINE: Laid by 400 men in two weeks.
Plenty of jokes about (aboot?) them, though.

How do they make copper wire?
They get two Scotsmen to fight over a 2p coin.


A’ll get me cape...
 
Bravo Auld Yin - stand up for your native patois, by all means. :)

Slightly off-topic - do any of our resident porridge-wogs have a complete lyric for the pre-Boer War Glaswegian plain song:

' Wha saw the Tattie Howkers
Sailin' doon the Broomielaw? '


Ta.
Here you are..


Wha Saw the 42nd
Download Midi Download MP3
Wha Saw the 42nd

1.
Saw ye the Forty-Second?
Saw ye them gaun awa'?
Saw ye the Forty-Second
Marching to the Broomielaw?

Some o' them had boots an' stockin's,
Some o' them had nane ava;
Some o' them had tartan plaidies,
Marching to the Broomielaw.

2.
Fa saw the Forty-Second,
Fa saw them gang awa?
Fa saw the Forty-Second
Gaein' to the Waupinschaw?
Some o' them gat chappit tatties,
Some o' them gat nane ava.
Some o' them gat barley bannocks,
Gaein' to the Waupinschaw.

Fa saw the Forty-Second,
Fa saw them gang awa?
Fa saw the Forty-Second
Marchin' doun the Broomie-Law?
Some of them had tartan troosers,
Some of them had nane ava,
Some of them had green umbrellas,
Marchin' doun the Broomie-Law.

3.
Wha saw the `Forty-second'
Wha saw them gaun awa'
Wha saw the `Forty-second'
Marchin' doon the Broomielaw.
Some o' them had buits and stockin's,
Some o' them had nane at a',
Some o' them had tartan trousers,
Marchin' doon the Broomielaw.

[Repeat lines 1-4]
Some o' them had kilts and sporrans,
Some o' them had nane at a',
Some o' them had braw Glengarries
Marchin' doon the Broomielaw.
________________________________________________________

(1) Ford CR, 32; a Glasgow rhyme from the time of the
Crimean War. A version coll. 1989 (ultimately from
Airdrie, c. 1930) has 4 Sailing (cf. "Wha saw the
cotton-spinners"); 7-8 = 1-2.
(2) Nicht at Eenie (1932), 6 (with music); whence
Montgomerie SNR (1946), 93 (no. 114), with music.
(3) Carlton Folk Songs (n.d.), 13, with music. (Spelling
regularised.) Note says: "The location was altered to
suit whichever Town or Place where the ditty was sung.
In Glasgow it was Broomielaw, in Perth it was Thimbleraw
etc." [Ritchie (1964), 14, has 1-8, with 7 kilts and
sporrans, 8 thro'.]

Cf. "Wha saw the Cotton Spinners". At a later date this
was parodied into:
Wha' saw the tattie howkers,

Wha' saw them gang awa'?

Wha' saw the tattie howkers,

Marching through the Broomielaw?

Some of them had bits of stockings,

Some of them had nane at a',

Some of them had umberellas

Marching through the Broomielaw.

[MacColl Streets of Song, no. 62, learned in childhood in
Glasgow.]
The tune is an adaptation of Whistle o'er the Lave o't; see
note to "Katie Bairdie". MS

Note: The version I heard is:

March past, the forty-second,
March past, the forty-twa'
March past, the bare-arsed bastards
Comin' from Ashanti war

Some o' them hae Hielan' bonnets
Some o' them hae nane at a'
Some hae kilts an' others hae na'
They be Hielan' laddies raw..

I have no idea where I heard it, though. RG
MS, RG



And a wee cameo from the Great Escape..https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jjVUlxkij1w
 
Last edited:

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
I'm in Yorkshire already and understand everyone perfectly well.

and shouldn't that be gods semi autonomous region? although I'm not sure which god would want it, Herne the Hunted maybe or OOM.I can feel the envy here, Yorkshire, home of the Green eyed Monster! :)

I mean its not exactly going to inspire Greek gods is it, unless they have fleece lined goretex Togas. Edinburgh, aka The Athens if the North. Of course Greek Gods like S Orland and use their time to make their homage to Scotland's God.

I'm not sure scotland even has a patois - a patina definately - algae and rust mainly. Not only patois but Glasgow Patter which is a joy to behold! On top of that we also have a language separate to English which the Scot Gov are determined to push by changing signs and police/ambulance signage, regardless of the fact that only about 1% speak and understand it! :)

And that obsession with Jewish poetry is just wierd. Poetry is the soul of mankind and transcends nationality!
You poor green eyed Yorkie (dog, biscuit, choccy bar, you choose). Some explanation for you above!
 
Bravo Auld Yin - stand up for your native patois, by all means. :)

Slightly off-topic - do any of our resident porridge-wogs have a complete lyric for the pre-Boer War Glaswegian plain song:

' Wha saw the Tattie Howkers
Sailin' doon the Broomielaw? '


Ta.
Wha Saw the 42nd

Wha saw the 42nd, wha saw them gaun awa?
Wha saw the 42nd merchin doon the Broomielaw?
Some o them had boots an stockins
Some o them had nane at aa
Some o them had tattie scones
For tae keep the cauld awa.

Wha saw the 42nd, wha saw them gaun awa?
Wha saw the 42nd merchin doon the Broomielaw?
Some o them had tartan toories
Some o them had nane at aa
Some o them had green umbrellas
For tae keep the rain awa.

Wha saw the tattie howkers? Wha saw them gaun awa?
Wha saw the tatttie howkers merchin doon the Broomielaw?
Some o them had boots an stockins
Some o them had nane at aa
Some o them had a wee drop whisky
For tae keep the cauld awa

 
This book is just legitimising blatant porridge woggery.
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor

New Posts

Latest Threads

Top