Catch 22 TV Series

#81
It got a laugh out of me and the missus.

Sorry, I shall go flagellate myself for daring to suggest something of this century is better/or not equal to the original!
Its like watching LOTR nerds watching the films round here...
Good. Major Major;s promotion occupied one sentence in the book, I'm a bit baffled why they'd expand that into a scene of several minutes whilst leaving out many other parts completely.
 
#83
Good. Major Major;s promotion occupied one sentence in the book, I'm a bit baffled why they'd expand that into a scene of several minutes whilst leaving out many other parts completely.
That.^

This: "Actually, Major Major had been promoted by an I.B.M. machine with a sense of humor almost as keen as his father’s."

And it happened four days into his military career, not when he was a Sergeant.

Pedantry aside it doesn't really make much difference to the series though. They have made the narrative more linear (i.e when Major Major got promoted he reported to Lieutenant Scheisskopf). which is probably sensible.
 
#84
Watched Ep2 last night. Enjoyed it.

It’s starting to deviate from the book. Sergeant Major Major Major was promoted to Major Major Major Major by an error in an IBM tabulating machine (which had the same sense of humour as his father) rather than at the whim of Cathcart.

I couldn’t work out why the tomato truck was right hand drive. MM is turning out nicely with his spivvery - at the moment it’s sensible (lamb chops, tomatoes etc) but it is on the turn to lunacy with the plan to fly into German territory.

If you look at the credits there are loads of women involved in the production. I read an interview with Clooney who said that, not surprisingly, there were few women in the book (apart from Nateleys whore) so they beefed up the number of females in the team as a form of atonement.

I still think the flak density is excessive.

Actually I will eat my words on that comment.
View attachment 401787

But that is radar controlled flak over somewhere like Schweinfurt.
At that time,Italian vehicles were right hand drive and they drove on the left. They switched to left handers around 1950.
 
#85
At that time,Italian vehicles were right hand drive and they drove on the left. They switched to left handers around 1950.
I think the reality is a bit more nuanced than that.

In Italy the practice of driving on the right first began in the late 1890s. The first Italian Highway Code, issued on 30 June 1912, stated that all vehicles had to drive on the right. Cities with a tram network, however, could retain left-hand driving if they placed warning signs at their city borders. The 1923 decree is a bit stricter, but Rome and the northern cities of Milan, Turin and Genoa could still keep left until further orders from the Ministry of Public Works. By the mid-1920s, right-hand driving became finally standard throughout the country. Rome made the change on the 1 of March 1925 and Milan on 3 August 1926.​
Which probably explains the ancient right hand drive farm truck.
 
#86
I think the reality is a bit more nuanced than that.

In Italy the practice of driving on the right first began in the late 1890s. The first Italian Highway Code, issued on 30 June 1912, stated that all vehicles had to drive on the right. Cities with a tram network, however, could retain left-hand driving if they placed warning signs at their city borders. The 1923 decree is a bit stricter, but Rome and the northern cities of Milan, Turin and Genoa could still keep left until further orders from the Ministry of Public Works. By the mid-1920s, right-hand driving became finally standard throughout the country. Rome made the change on the 1 of March 1925 and Milan on 3 August 1926.​
Which probably explains the ancient right hand drive farm truck.

Just a quick google, found this. RHD!

TRATTRICE PESANTE BREDA 40 - KIT DOC MODELS, 1/72
 
#87
I'm enjoying the series, one thing I've noticed though - I had a lot more sympathy for Yossarian in the book than I do in this series.

Even though I know he doesn't, I was praying he'd own up to moving the bomb line rather than dropping every one in it.

Milo is as fantastic as I remember though!
 
#88
I'm enjoying the series, one thing I've noticed though - I had a lot more sympathy for Yossarian in the book than I do in this series.

Even though I know he doesn't, I was praying he'd own up to moving the bomb line rather than dropping every one in it.

Milo is as fantastic as I remember though!
Agreed, and I've enjoyed the series more and more as it's progressed. The 1st episode was a real '50/50 call', but I'm pleased I persevered with it.
 
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#89
I'm enjoying the series, one thing I've noticed though - I had a lot more sympathy for Yossarian in the book than I do in this series.

Even though I know he doesn't, I was praying he'd own up to moving the bomb line rather than dropping every one in it.

Milo is as fantastic as I remember though!
I agree and think it is down to trying to condense the book into a series. A lot of the nuance is lost.

Yossarian's reasons for wanting out are more closely examined in the book and are made to sound rational. In the series he does come across as a bit of a coward rather than someone who has realised that everyone is trying to kill him (Germans, his colleagues, the chain of command, prostitutes, bad luck, gravity etc).

Milo has gone from being a bit of a spivvy wide boy to insane surreal capitalist in less than an hour. The best is yet to come (says he, avoiding spoilers).
 
#90
I've not read the book in so long I've forgotten it. Haven't seen the film as i couldn't put Arkin into the role. This chap in the series does it if you ask me. I didn't like Ep 1 but am now up to date & like it for satirical series about WW2 in general. Its watchable.

Ref the flak intensity, bearing in mind B25s are medium bombers the altitudes were generally below 20k feet & at time closer to 10 to aid accuracy. Flak would have been coming from anything 20mm calibre & above so would have been fooking thick at those heights.
 
#91
I agree and think it is down to trying to condense the book into a series. A lot of the nuance is lost.

Yossarian's reasons for wanting out are more closely examined in the book and are made to sound rational. In the series he does come across as a bit of a coward rather than someone who has realised that everyone is trying to kill him (Germans, his colleagues, the chain of command, prostitutes, bad luck, gravity etc).

Milo has gone from being a bit of a spivvy wide boy to insane surreal capitalist in less than an hour. The best is yet to come (says he, avoiding spoilers).
You can argue a coward is a sane man in an insane situation.
 
#92
Good point.

I think the trick is not to expect the TV series to doggedly follow the book. As long as the general themes of stupidity, insane bureaucracy and madness is captured that's good enough for me.

Its too easy to nitpick the series v book with spod pedantry (to which I plead guilty) with things like Yossarian only made captain after he went around twice to bomb the bridge at Ferrarra. Bugger.
 

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