CATAC

Discussion in 'Officers' started by Jelly_Baby, May 11, 2004.

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  1. Soon to ge going on CATAC (TA) and wondered if the good ladies and gentlemen who subscribe this website and have done either the TA or Reg version would be able to give me an insight to the delights of this course. What is the split in emphasis between light roled tactics and armour (my background).

    (And yes - perhaps this post should be in the 'Just TA' forum but I am aiming for a higher standard of response here).
     
  2. CATAC exists to train sub-unit commanders of the Combat and Combat Support Arms in the practical application of Combined Arms' Tactics, in order to prepare them for operations in high intensity warfighting within or in support of the battlegroup. Those who are about to take up appointments, as Sub-Unit Commanders of the Combat and Combat Supporting Arms, are eligible to attend the course. It is also open to Forward Observation Officers and staff officers who are about to take up tactics' teaching posts. The course is delivered in three modules (Doctrinal basics, Best Practice and Practical Application on FTX) to enable students with widely varied experience to develop from different pre-course levels as well as acquiring skills in their specific discipline. Significant emphasis is placed on Syndicate (Small Group) discussion and sharing of experience and expertise.

    Module 1 (5 days) is an introduction/refresher to basic doctrine and tactics. This covers Infantry, armoured infantry and armoured warfare in different environments including urban operations. This is designed to equip the students with the basic knowledge of doctrine and tactics required for command in a combined arms organisation. Instruction is presented in a mix of central presentations, syndicate lectures/discussions and practical work.

    Module 2 (5 days) is Best Practice, building on the basis formed during module 1, students apply lessons learned to practical problems through the use of TEWTs and simulations in preparation for execution of live missions during the final FTX.

    Module 3 (4 days) is the culminating exercise requiring the students to serve in their assigned roles in a battle group in a field environment. The FTX is a 4-day, continuous operation where the student must execute missions in a realistic combat environment. Each student will be evaluated in multiple leadership roles consistent with their follow on posting.

    The course endstate is a confident, capable officer with a sound understanding of company level tactics who is prepared to take command of a combat or combat support organisation.

    Nearly everyone who attends CATAC has a huge laugh, learns a lot, and goes away a more informed (not necessarily the same as better - nature vs nuture) leader. The course leans towards armoured warfare, but only because of the numbers of students who will go to sub-units specialising in this form of warfare - armoured warfare is arguably more complicated with more moving parts etc etc. You will still get out on your feet and tab around.

    PM me for more info if you want :D
     
  3. Nice one Sloping Wire, I'm going on the course as well and your comments are very useful. How tough are the TEWTs?
     
  4. msr

    msr LE

    Did you get a refund from Dale Carnegie's course?

    msr
     
  5. All TEWTs are as difficult as you choose to make them! Bear in mind that when you do them, you will be able to draw on newly instilled knowledge gleaned over the past week's instruction, so 'pay attention' during that week!! :D

    You will be able to help yourself before attending the course to have a good working knowledge of the functions in combat; principles of defence and offence; understand the transitional phases (particularly F/RPOL!); read into urban operations generally (there are some very good articles in past copies of BAR and ADTN); and get a handle on what the Combat Support Arms can do for you in the context of an All Arms grouping ie a Battlegroup ie what the BC and the FPC actually do, what the BGE brings to the party, role of the BGWO, the difference between ISTAR and G2 etc.

    Hope this answers your question! :D
     
  6. Excellent advice. Thank you very much for that.
     
  7. Best piece of advice I got pre-course was to shoot for the moon when asked what appointments you want on the confirmatory exercise. If infantry, go for Inf Coy Comd / BG CO in order of preference.

    The number of people who went "oooh..... can I be a FOO, or maybe a recce sect comd" was surprising. Don't ask, don't get.

    Great course, you'll love it, I learned a huge amount.

    Including what to do when the Chinook broke down halfway through the 2nd of 3 lifts taking my Coy Gp to Imber for the BG quick attack, leaving the Coy spread in three places across 5km of the Plain, at H-40mins :( :(
     
  8. Yes, definitely. Lots of people get sucked into their speciality and comfort zone - they don't need to. There's plenty of time in the Field Army to get to grips with your new job - unless you're taking over an Armoured Squadron in the middle of a training year and about to deploy to BATUS (no names etc)! :D

    If you want JIs/Kit list etc PM me. :D
     
  9. experience of what happens when you lose lots of assault troops at H-40 is good experience for the nasty reality of real life at the sharp end. if it can happen in training it can happen for real - and things can only get worse when someone is shooting back at you.

    you obviously learned a good lesson, as did the others present, and you have shared it with others. that is part of learning.

    go and enjoy the training, you dont normally get killed and cock-ups are correctable!!
     
  10. chimera

    chimera LE Moderator

    Agree with all above. It's a great course. It is heavy metal biased, and is almost an entry level qualification for anyone going to sub-unit command in a combat or combat support arm in either 1 or 3 Div.
     
  11. The Land Warfare Centre rocks!

    If you would like a full course list, PM me!!

    Bello te prepares