Casting Call 1/20 - Live in reach of Blackpool ?

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
If you live within a reasonable reach of Blackpool, Lancs - this may be of interest: ( @Kirkz ?)

Piece of Cake Casting Ltd

16 December 2019 ·
Blackpool 2020.


Do you, or someone you know live in the Blackpool area and would like to take part in a feature film?.
We are looking for all ages and ethnicities who will be available for filming from Feb onwards.
You must have the right to work in the UK with a National Insurance number and most importantly have a profile with us.
If you are already in this area and are registered you will be considered.
If you do not have a profile please follow this link. https://www.pieceofcakecasting.com/become-an-artiste/


Their FB page HERE has phone numbers and Message area if you have further questions..

NOTE


Travel and accommodation will be at your own expense please consider the logistics and commitment before confirming your availability;



Dates as follows:

FITTINGS
- Commencing the week of 10th Feb @ Pinewood Studios.

LADIES: You will be fitted in a corset - please decline if this is an issue



BLACKPOOL
FILMING DATES -

2nd,3rd,4th,5th,6th,7th March. MUST BE AVAILABLE FOR ALL YOU WILL BE STRICT CONTINUITY

RATES FOR BLACKPOOL FILMING - £135 for 12hr day & £5 per half hour of overtime.
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@Ravers and a few others have done this work. Not much pay, but it can be fun and you get fed.


As per earlier posts this is a genuine work opportunity.


Do.

Or do not.

There is no 'Try'
 

Kirkz

LE
No good for me Mukker I'm fully employed but I'll certainly pass on the info to some people it may be of use too.
 
Old Bill love location shoots taking place on their manor and are genetically primed to locate the catering wagon within seconds few. Tea and stickies on tap.

Alright Mr DeMille, I'm ready for my close-up.
 
Old Bill love location shoots taking place on their manor and are genetically primed to locate the catering wagon within seconds few. Tea and stickies on tap.

Alright Mr DeMille, I'm ready for my close-up.
The food can be pretty damn good depending on who is doing the catering. Posh nosh out of the back of a converted bus.
 
The overtime rate is actually less than the standard rate! Never seen that before. Bargain! :)
 
The food can be pretty damn good depending on who is doing the catering. Posh nosh out of the back of a converted bus.
A few years back I (and another dozen or so ex Mil ) did 3 days stunt work and acting on a film 'Christabel'.
One night we had to jump into the back garden of a Stately Home and then beat the crap out of Geoffrey Palmer.
At about 0130 hrs we retired to the Catering wagon for superbly cooked steak, chips , salad etc.
Next to the catering wagon was a small refrigerated truck filled to the brim with cases of Becks beer.
A thoroughly enjoyable evening in good company.
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
The overtime rate is actually less than the standard rate! Never seen that before. Bargain! :)
There are loads of weird contractual things in the film industry. Everything is agreed by the unions.

I seem to recall when I did extra work, even 1 minute over the standard 12 hour shift, constituted an extra days pay.

Or something like that. Anyway it was a lot of money. All the seasoned “full time” extras where clock watching and praying we’d go over. There may even have been a little bit of faffing around and disappearing to the bog to drag things out.

You also got about 30 quid extra if they had to alter your appearance in any way. So 30 quid for a haircut and / or a shave.

Always rock up unshaven just in case.

Pretty easy to clear over 200 quid (after agency fees) for sitting around all day and then milling around in the background for a few minutes.

AD723257-1E59-48BD-8308-99C8FD32CC8A.jpeg
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
There are loads of weird contractual things in the film industry. Everything is agreed by the unions.

I seem to recall when I did extra work, even 1 minute over the standard 12 hour shift, constituted an extra days pay.

Or something like that. Anyway it was a lot of money. All the seasoned “full time” extras where clock watching and praying we’d go over. There may even have been a little bit of faffing around and disappearing to the bog to drag things out.

You also got about 30 quid extra if they had to alter your appearance in any way. So 30 quid for a haircut and / or a shave.

Always rock up unshaven just in case.

Pretty easy to clear over 200 quid (after agency fees) for sitting around all day and then milling around in the background for a few minutes.

View attachment 445499
You played a lamp?
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
The overtime rate is actually less than the standard rate! Never seen that before. Bargain! :)
yeah ....on London (FAA) jobs overtime is paid at £17 per hour.....as Ravers said ^ on most large scale productions the Union and management have an agreed set of rates, which are constantly being bickered over:

2AD:' Is that your own Dinner Jacket - or ours?'
Goats: ' Mine'
2AD: ' Okay....that's another 19 quid'


BBC Productions have a separate set of rates.

For anyone who has done any kind of ordinary job the whole industry is gob-smacking.

But bear in mind, this is all about MONEY - and a lot of it.
These folks all take this stuff desperately seriously because it is their LIVELIHOOD, so you better had too.

Here y'go: PACT/FAA rates for Supporting Artists as of 1st March 2019

@Kirkz - If I get picked for this ( they are also shooting in London and Chichester) and bring my own dossbag and roll-mat - have you got floor-space?

Reasonably house-trained....Promise not to even breathe on the sacred vinyl collection (let alone touch it!) :)

Oh - and taking a leaf out of Raver's book

- Channel 4 series 'Megastructures'

Channel 4 - Megastructures small.jpg


- finally got my hands on an MP40. And yes, the shades are sh1t....sue me.
 
Last edited:

Kirkz

LE
yeah ....on London (FAA) jobs overtime is paid at £17 per hour.....as Ravers said ^ on most large scale productions the Union and management have an agreed set of rates, which are constantly being bickered over:

2AD:' Is that your own Dinner Jacket - or ours?'
Goats: ' Mine'
2AD: ' Okay....that's another 19 quid'


BBC Productions have a separate set of rates.

For anyone who has done any kind of ordinary job the whole industry is gob-smacking.

But bear in mind, this is all about MONEY - and a lot of it.
These folks all take this stuff desperately seriously because it is their LIVELIHOOD, so you better had too.

Here y'go: PACT/FAA rates for Supporting Artists as of 1st March 2019

@Kirkz - If I get picked for this ( they are also shooting in London and Chichester) and bring my own dossbag and roll-mat - have you got floor-space?

Reasonably house-trained....Promise not to even breathe on the sacred vinyl collection (let alone touch it!) :)

Oh - and taking a leaf out of Raver's book

- Channel 4 series 'Megastructures'

View attachment 445523

- finally got my hands on an MP40. And yes, the shades are sh1t....sue me.
I'm sure I can find room to shoehorn you in somewhere Mukker.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
If anyone - standFAST @Ravers ! - wants an inkling of what it's actually like on the average film set - this is part 5 of a Lockdown reminiscence from one of our own, found in Another Place.
May I commend it to the House:


Location
Part 5
Having ruined the last take on this production by waving a lamppost we continue with interminable retakes of what should be a fairly simple small scene. The problem is the uncontrollable actions of animals , weather and in one significant case an SA.
As previously mentioned , horses have a preponderance for crapping. They crap a lot. They crap so much that one hapless member of crew is designated the shit shoveler and she is overworked, poor thing. It isn’t the crap per se it’s the consequences . Mostly we can avoid contact with the mess but sometimes the eruption is so sudden it disrupts the smooth movement of the crowd who start hopping out of the way and occasionally slipping.
There is definitely a correlation between the word action and the flow of poo.
It’s like Pavlov’s Dog.
Unpleasant and not good on film.
The horses obviously have handlers on set. Two of these are themselves like extras from the dark side of Oliver Twist … they talk to the horses like Bill Sikes .
‘ Come on me beauty .. calm down ducks ‘. They treat SAs as an annoying inconvenience and make very little allowance for our sensibilities. A couple of SAs have refused to go near them so have been replaced by braver or stupider souls.
After an hour of filming the air has become acrid and smells like a rotting haystack. The shit shoveler has been joined by a colleague but they are still fighting a losing battle and the cobbles are disappearing. It’s starting to look more like the Somme than gentile Victorian London.
We break for a very late lunch.
To avoid a walk back through the great unwashed….lunch is a muted affair. We queue for pre- packed plastic containers and a roll and find places to perch that don’t smell like Lincolnshire.
I sit on the base of a column and try to work out the logistics of balancing the container on my knee while eating without further humiliating myself.
My new friend the Actor walks by and nods and grins. Nice touch but further cements my pariah status with my colleagues. He is accompanied by a very big box office star who turns up for the afternoon. It just happens that I have known this man for many years as he was a customer of mine when I ran a shop. He looks at me …..he is aware he knows me but I am out of context and in costume.
SA etiquette is that you can only talk to a principle if they talk to you and I could do without more hissing so I vaguely smile and he carries on past. Throughout the rest of the shoot I can see him battling to place me . As far as I know he doesn’t.
Lunch over we line up and go back to the courtyard. The cobbles have been hosed down and the extra benefit of a rain shower has cleaned everything up.
We continue the scene but the camera has moved to a different angle. It is pointed directly at me.
Not my issue. Just before the take the AD asks all the SAs who were Detectives in the morning to raise their hands. We are taken off set.
The next couple of hours are ‘echte’ extra work . That means we sit in holding and wait , and wait.
I chat to the couple of my colleagues who are still talking to me and drink more tea.
We swap stories and moan ,of course , and laugh , of course and marvel that we get paid to do this.
Eventually we are called back for the last scene. It is a repeat of the first shot except that this will be a using a drone .
While the technicians set up the drone to take off from the middle of the courtyard we are told to avoid the area near it but close in when it has taken off.
We are not confident about the safety of this procedure.
This drone is no toy , it’s the size of a fridge freezer and makes a ghastly noise like a swarm of angry bees .
We do a nervous take . The director says cut . The drone returns and makes a wobbly landing.
The director makes a rare speech. He knows it’s been a long day and thanks us but this is an important shot. We are asked not look up … on the first take we were all simultaneously staring skyward as if anticipating the second coming…not the look he was after.
We go a number of times and get more confident that we won’t be decapitated.
Finally ….. we wrap.
We are too tired at this point to bother to run for the mini buses so it’s a sedated ride back to Battersea.
There is a zen feel in the bus . We have done our jobs ..we survived and it’s under our belts.
I have been forgiven for jumping the queue in the morning and a little rush of adrenaline has energised us for the last procedures of de- rigging .
The tall AD wishes me a warm goodbye with that lovely smile which is nice and I set off home through a sultry London evening mulling over the day and smiling.
It is a difficult thing to convey how that end of the day hour feels .
We are not actors.
We re-act at best. We create very little individually, but collectively we are indispensable. When the final work appears we are not noticed, but if we weren’t there , there would be no film. Each of us add to the creative whole and if we did our job properly we should be proud.
As I as drive back through my beautiful city ... I’m happy ..a couple of hiccups but another job I did my best on.
Once home one of my daughters asks what I did today.
Er … actually not that much.
But those of us in the bubble know ….. ..and God it was fun.


--------------------------- endit ------------------------ -------------------------
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
This extract (written by Peter B. ) gives a view of a Background artiste with no military background attempting to portray a 1914 General Officer:


Part 2
It is one of the joys of this job that one finds oneself in places one would never normally see.
Since my entire military knowledge consists of bread soldiers to dip in my egg , walking the grounds of Britains most famous military Academy is surreal to the extreme.

I check in to the holding area near the main building on this complex , a huge Georgian pile fronted by Doric columns and sweeping steps and looking out over the parade ground.
The production has an entire company of cadets dressed in First World War uniforms to do a march pass during which a select group of about ten Generals will take the salute .

I am one of the ten.
We meet the costume people who work rapidly to sort out our complex uniforms and then to makeup.
My friend Martin who has an unacceptably bald upper lip is enhanced by a rather fetching handlebar tache. My own luxuriant growth is waxed as it was at the fitting but this time I am ready and my sneeze is into a tissue.
We are all eternally grateful .
I have written before about the phenomenon of grouping according to social types or uniform but this time we Generals are segregated from the cadets . We are billeted in the grand anti-room of the main building ..even the crew treat us with uncharacteristic respect , but we do admittedly look imposing !

The first AD briefs us.
This scene is an historically significant march pass , a huge piece of precision timing , and crucially we are to salute on the shout of
‘Eyes right’
That means that this set of ten Generals in a row in front of hundreds of marching soldiers , on film , have to salute convincingly and in unison.
We look nervously at each other ... a set of over sixties whose total military experience is one Boys Brigade and a scout.

Our AD has a surprise. Having anticipated our pitiful lack of knowledge ,production has enlisted some help.
It is the Regimental Sergeant Major of this Academy ....or God as he is known here .
Terrifying.
We line up
In marches God . He is every Sergeant Major in every film you have ever seen .
He walks silently down the line checking our uniforms. He stands back.
He stares at us from under his hat with laser eyes and we stifle nervous giggles.

‘Gentleman. You are the cream of the British military of 1914 . You are career Army soldiers who have served their country for decades.’

You lot , however , are slouching there like you’ve had a bad day of train spotting .!
Not acceptable. You need to stand as if you have a plank down your backs ..no hint of a stoop. Let’s try that.’

In print that looks like a reasonably measured request.
What you can’t get is the menace in the voice.
We are aware if we don’t get it right we will die. Horribly.
We all creak to an impossibly upright position.

He grunts.
Now he explains where our hands need to be at the beginning and the end of this salute. The palm must be flat open and at its apex should be above your right eye just touching the brim of your hat.
He says he will count to three and we go.
One...two...three.
Carnage.
Martin gets it perfectly Curses.
I poke myself badly in the eye and my hat skews. The old boy next to me actually uses the wrong arm so intertwines with his colleague and their salute doesn’t materialise. Further down the line two hats become airborne.

Sergeant Major looks like we spat at him and turns on his heel to talk to the first AD .
I guess he wants more time....like a year.


We spend an hour trying to get it right. One thing I never knew is that while you hold the salute you need to be so tensed that you are in pain .
I have to be doing it right because I’m in bloody agony.
It’s finally conceded that maybe we should try a take.
We are walked out to the columns that front the parade ground and evenly spaced looking from our vantage point down a majestic row of steps to the parade ground.
We are now REALLY nervous.
This thing is huge.
We look out at rows and rows of soldiers , horses , gun carriages and then beyond them ...BIG cameras on booms , scaffolding , and trucks as well as a number of handicams. All trained on us as the big Actor now appears and stands , with presence , in the centre.

We all know that every screw up we make means hundreds of people will have to go back to their marks.
No pressure.

It is a gloriously sunny February day ,uncharacteristically warm , and here I stand in this majestic place in Berkshire waiting for the British Army to march past me and I get to salute them .

A look along the row of Generals... clerks , shopkeepers, accountants , teachers , we lock eyes and I know we are all thinking the same.
How wonderful is this.
Rolling.....background action !
Action!
Gulp .


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