Casevac WW1 and Captain Noel Chavasse

I pass the statue memorial to Capt Chavasse most days. It displays him rescuing a casualty in a manner have not seen before, or been trained to do. The casualty is behind, the Captain has his right hand over his right shoulder grasping the right hand/wrist of the casualty, whilst the Captain's left hand is under the casualty's left armpit. It looks like quite an uncomfortable and cumbersome manoeuvre. Is this still a taught practice?

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It is probably due to the good Doctor being physically fxxked from dragging a casualty through thick mud in heavy combat conditions. Deadweight casualties (casualties that can't recover themselves) are fxxking heavy mate, it's bad enough in MTP and Osprey (plus accroutrements), I couldn't imagine doing it in No.2 Dress wearing thick heavy woollen underwear and shirt too.
 
Deadweight casualties (casualties that can't recover themselves) are fxxking heavy

Nope, I was heavy because i’m fat, poor buggers had to carry me up a hill.
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
try dragging someone round the garden that way. I've not seen any training material (historic or recent) that recommends that particular carry, although improvised carries and stretchers are taught.

I'm willing to guess it's at least a little bit of artistic licence rather than an accurate portrayal of the incident (I'm guessing the sculptor wasn't at the incident and Capt NG Chavasse VC and Bar, MC. wasn't around to pose for it

War Office, September, 1917.

His Majesty the KING has been graciously pleased to approve of the award of a Bar to the Victoria Cross to Capt. Noel Godfrey Chavasse, V.C., M.C., late R.A.M.C., attd. L'pool R.

For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty when in action.

Though severely wounded early in the action whilst carrying a wounded soldier to the Dressing Station, Capt. Chavasse refused to leave his post, and for two days not only continued to perform his duties, but in addition went out repeatedly under heavy fire to search for and attend to the wounded who were lying out.

During these searches, although practically without food during this period, worn with fatigue and faint with his wound, he assisted to carry in a number of badly wounded men, over heavy and difficult ground.

By his extraordinary energy and inspiring example, he was instrumental in rescuing many wounded who would have otherwise undoubtedly succumbed under the bad weather conditions.

This devoted and gallant officer subsequently died of his wounds.
 
It's how the sculptor imagined it.

Chavasse lived just a hundred yards or so from the location of the statue. His father was Bishop of Liverpool.

Abercromby Square was a hotbed of support for the Confederacy during the American Civil War, with various agents, offices and business men who favoured the South being located there. It was said that there were more Confederate flags flying over Abercromby Square than over the whole of Richmond Va. (No doubt some hyperbole there !)

Liverpool was the location of the last surrender of a Confederate military unit in 1865, several months after Lee had thrown in the towel at Appomattox Court House. I'll let the Google Jockeys have fun figuring that one out, but it is absolutely true !

General U.S. Grant landed at Liverpool during his world tour after he left the Presidency. He only spent a night or two there before moving on to Manchester. There he gave a very generous, somewhat pointed, speech to the folk of the city which had shown fine support for the Union and for Abraham Lincoln at the time of Abe's Emancipation Proclamation on 1 Jan 1863.
 
It's how the sculptor imagined it.

Chavasse lived just a hundred yards or so from the location of the statue. His father was Bishop of Liverpool.

Abercromby Square was a hotbed of support for the Confederacy during the American Civil War, with various agents, offices and business men who favoured the South being located there. It was said that there were more Confederate flags flying over Abercromby Square than over the whole of Richmond Va. (No doubt some hyperbole there !)

Liverpool was the location of the last surrender of a Confederate military unit in 1865, several months after Lee had thrown in the towel at Appomattox Court House. I'll let the Google Jockeys have fun figuring that one out, but it is absolutely true !

General U.S. Grant landed at Liverpool during his world tour after he left the Presidency. He only spent a night or two there before moving on to Manchester. There he gave a very generous, somewhat pointed, speech to the folk of the city which had shown fine support for the Union and for Abraham Lincoln at the time of Abe's Emancipation Proclamation on 1 Jan 1863.

Most informative.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer

O Zangado

War Hero

They do seem quite proud of him
And rightly so. Only three men have ever won the VC and Bar - Arthur Martin-Leake, Noel Chavasse and Charles Upham, in the Boer War, WW1 and WW2 respectively. It is interesting to note that the first two were both officers in the RAMC.

I rang pal of mine just now who attended Liverpool College, where both Noel and his brother, Christopher (OBE, MC, TD and later Bisop of Rochester) were also pupils. One of the houses in Lower School was named Chavasse in Noel's honour.

OZ
 
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