Careful visiting Canada - 50% of women are abused

Discussion in 'Canada' started by Guns, Aug 17, 2013.

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  1. Guns

    Guns LE Moderator Book Reviewer
    1. The Royal Navy

    Canadianwomen.org

    Some strong claims. Of course when you read in to the figures it is not quite as media shouty as it looks. The figures are massaged to the 50% with much greater reporting in certain groups of women. Plus the definitions of abuse are very wide.

    It shows how people can manipulate others with statistics as the studies and the way it has been represented is wrong on so many levels
     
  2. It's a nonsense mate. From my experience "domestic violence" is massively over reported here. For every 50 reports that are classed as "domestic abuse" only 1 involves an arrestable offense.

    For example. Little Jonny (aged 12) won't go to bed? Call the police (I kid ye not) this is classed as a domestic and is recorded as such.

    The neighbors overhear you and the wife arguing and call the police...recorded as a domestic.

    Your ex sends you a text telling you to poke it when you ask for some of your stuff. Call the police....recorded as a domestic.

    Stalk your ex and subject her to Facebook and text abuse. Call the police, recorded as a domestic and get locked up. Rightfully so.

    Actually hit your partner and cause an injury you get locked up...rightfully so.

    But of the 5 scenarios the last two only appear in 1 in 50 domestic calls (and that's on the generous side).


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  3. Do the Canadian police authorities really act after hearing only one side of the story?
     
  4. Yup, but only in cases of domestic violence where there's other evidence to support it (such as a physical injury). Two couples having a verbal argument doesn't result in anything other than another report.

    Even shouting at your kids results in one if someone calls it in.

    Massively over reported.


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  5. They don't have to act, they just need to base the stats on reported incidents in order to influence the figures.
     
  6. Yes but don't forget that even looking at the missus the wrong way counts as abuse.

    Her, I woke up at 04:30 this morning and you had hogged all the bedclothes.
    Me; Yes dear
    Her; you're getting worse you know that?
    Me; Am I dear?
    Her; you're going into one of your dumb insolence modes again.

    You don't tell her, well actually you hadn't left much cover for me, you'd chucked my pillows off the bed etc.

    Domestic abuse?!!!
     
  7. Uhm, I'm a Canadian woman and never heard of this lot. Quick look at the page told me all I need to know when I see the name Rosemary Brown. Ultra leftwing feminist, always quick to shout oppression.

    50%? At a push if you include catty comments, etc. It's not the sort of thing you discuss over coffee, only two women on my ward at work have reported domestic abuse and sad as it is to say it, they have done it to themselves. What makes you think an exgangbanger that hasn't worked in a year is good husband material? That he will love you, honour you, occasionally pay a bill and not bang the bridesmaid? I work with the prize that married this man who bankrupted her, put her home into foreclosure and now she's abused. When her best friend refused to be a bridesmaid and she he was a putz?

    If you are First Nations there is a higher chance of abuse but that's a whole other mess.
     
  8. They don't need to hear any side of the story before acting.
     
  9. I read the posts on this thread and questioned the accuracy of the figures. I was talking with a Canadian riend later in the evening and as she is an OB-GYM doctor I asked her if she thought the statistics sounded realistic and she thought they were way too high.

    Looking at Canadian crime stats I found it interesting to look at the numbers for Nunavut. Nunavut is the largest province in area (about 8 times larger that the UK) and the province with the smallest population, around 32,000 people (about 1/2000th of the UK population) The overall crime rate in Nunavut is 4 times the rate of Canada, the rate for violent crime in Nunavut is about 7 times higher than the national rate. I have not seen details on whether alcohol might be a problem but I understand that Canada has a significant problem of alcohol abuse in areas that are home to many First Nations people. It might not be politically correct to suggest this but alcohol as a cause would seem to be a factor.
     
  10. Alcohol is probably a factor in most forms of violent crime to be honest mate. But I imagine the reserves are a gong show of it.

    The natives who live in the city certainly punch above their weight (if you pardon the expression) when it comes to violent crime.


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  11. Trust me the reserves are full of alcohol and drug abuse. The favourite claim is it's all the whiteman's fault for the Residential Schools destroying the native way of life. There are several native gangs in my region that are violent, run drugs and prostitution rings. Drive by shootings on reserve have claimed more than a few small children's lives.

    I used to work in inner city clinics. The women are always way more in your face than the males. I've never felt frightened with a male native in an exam room but women? Two staff at all times.

    Nunavut is still a territory and bootlegging is not unknown.
     
  12. To repeat what others have said, I live in Canada and I've never head of them before. However a bit of quick googling turns up the following:

    • There are very few mainstream news reports about them, which is generally not a good sign.
    • An elderly wealthy woman died and left a large sum of money to them a couple of years ago, which appears to be where they get their money from.
    • The CBC investigated another one of the organizations claims regarding a survey commissioned by them on attitudes towards sexual assault and found that the results stemmed from the question being worded in such a way that it tended to be misinterpreted by the people being surveyed. The CBC didn't draw any conclusions about that, but I would not be surprised if the wording of the question was deliberate in order to produce a talking point to use with the press. Can a woman provoke or encourage sexual assault? - Nova Scotia - CBC News

    To be clear on this I happen to think that beating up women (or anyone else for that matter) is a really bad idea, but I don't think you can get a reasonable picture of the problem from this organisation.

    And DavidBOC, be careful when comparing crime rates for places like Nunavut, NWT, or Yukon to places like Ontario. The crime rate numbers for territories with small populations can be skewed by quite a bit in any particular year by a relatively few incidents. All it would take for one of the territories to have a murder rate well above the national average would be to have one guy stab his brother-in-law. Also reporting practices and enforcement can vary by quite a bit and the nature of "violent crime" can be quite different. A drunken punch-up between relatives isn't the same thing as a robbery, but they're both violent crimes. The Nunavut figures (and I imagine NWT and Yukon are the same) will be massively inflated by the former.

    And to add to what clothears said, Nunavut, Northwest Territories and Yukon are territories, not provinces. The difference is that provinces have a greater degree of autonomy and self government.
     
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  13. Sorry about mixing up territory and province, I come from the "Deep South" (Massachusetts)

    I certainly know how a few individuals can skew time states. I used to be legal counsel or a police department in a city of 100.000. There was one individual, Junior M****, who was a career burglar, Every time he went to prison the burglary rate dropped around 35% and every time he got out on parole the rate jumped right up again.
     
  14. Crime tends to be higher in areas whee their's high poverty, high boredom, and a sense of hopelessness. Well guess what? Nunavut and the NWT have that in ******* spades. The only real money to be had there is in diamond mining and then you have the always pleasant cocktail of young men with lots of money and nothing to do for a week. It is, however, worth noting that a lot of communities in the North have banned alcohol completely, so a guy ski doing in a case of beer would be a criminal, and that must skew the rate some what.