career limiting move... oopsie!

#21
ive done 3 tours whilst working for the same employer.

although i wouldnt change any of my time i would advise anyone, especially given the present economic climate, to put their families and then their careers before the TA and mobilisation.

i'm not complaining but once your usefullness is over with the army you are quickly forgotten. its not worth sacrificing your career for.

i have damaged my civi career to such an extent that i am now looking into a complete change of direction work wise as my chances of promotion are zero.

on the other hand mobilisation gives us fortunate few a choice of safety net if we are made redundant. many civis have no choices at all. at least we have.
 
#22
fusilier50 said:
ive done 3 tours whilst working for the same employer.

although i wouldnt change any of my time i would advise anyone, especially given the present economic climate, to put their families and then their careers before the TA and mobilisation.

i'm not complaining but once your usefullness is over with the army you are quickly forgotten. its not worth sacrificing your career for.

i have damaged my civi career to such an extent that i am now looking into a complete change of direction work wise as my chances of promotion are zero.

on the other hand mobilisation gives us fortunate few a choice of safety net if we are made redundant. many civis have no choices at all. at least we have.
The other option is FTRS. Still no long-term job security - but then who has that these days anyway except civil servants ? At least you get to choose where you send the next 2 years.

The only way MOD will get a decent number of employers to allow TA to deploy will be to make it worth their while. How about a rebate on NI for all TA employees and some sort of tax credit for training and employing the stand-in while a TA soldier is mobilised - Justified to the Treasury in terms of taking some wallah off the dole for 9 months?
 
#23
Hootch said:
One_of_the_strange said:
You have a choice. Keep your job or get mobilised. And that all the comfort there is I'm afraid.

While it is not guaranteed he'll win it might as well be as I'm not aware of any employers losing - they're trying as hard as they can not to annoy them any more. (That's why they insist they're onside before mobilising of course)
Not true OotS - recent case were it went to appeal and the employer lost.
BE VERY CAREFUL WITH THIS VERY FRAGILE STATEMENT!

It is true that a recent case went to court and the the employer lost. However, it is the only case for at least 18 months (the RAF case being the most recent before that) and the penalty was that the employer was fined. The individual did not get their job back.

And the fine?

About £4k - abolutely no incentive for any future employers to simply ignore the now proven to be pathetic 'penalties'. Considerably less than a redundancy payment or the costs of restructuring (the other way round RFA 96).

RFA 96 will NOT protect your employment. Even if you do get your job back - after you have confirmed with your employer that your loyalty lies with the Army, not him - your career will most likely be shot to shreds (see other post above).

The only place where it is 'working' is in the NHS for surgeons etc - and that's principally because the surgeons are usually thin on the ground anyway.

RFA 96 is only effective when it comes to mobilising personnel - heavily weighted towards the MOD.
 

RP578

LE
Book Reviewer
#24
Wingletang,

I think OOTS was referring to an Employer's chance of success in appealing against an employee's mobilisation and not a case of unfair dismissal.
 
#25
Acht - 'tis a crappy state of affairs. Basically my boss is scared his research will go down the pan if I deploy (I'm his main boffin) and he's decided to take on a whole load of PhD students about the same time as my deployment before he knew I was offski. As for being a 'specialist' - apparently I'm one of very few in the country that can do what I can do, and no my civvie skills are not used in the TA (that's why I joined...!) I'm just a Lance-Jack, so no - my TA pay isn't quite the same as my civvie pay. I also have some long-standing teaching arrangements with the uni that I work for and an informal semi-fellowship, so I have yet to break the news to various people that they have to find another 'tutor' for next year. bollox... I would go regular, but I'm too old to commission (32) and too educated (apparently!!!) for the ranks and generally have been a civvie for too long. My boyf (regular) thinks this is hilarious and has told me it's all my fault for wanting my cake and eating it too.
 
#26
RP578 said:
Wingletang,

I think OOTS was referring to an Employer's chance of success in appealing against an employee's mobilisation and not a case of unfair dismissal.
It was Hootch's comment I was responding to.
 

RP578

LE
Book Reviewer
#27
Wingletang said:
It was Hootch's comment I was responding to.
Seen.

shrew - from what you've posted above, I reckon that your boss has a fairly legitimate and frankly, a pretty understandable, case for appeal against your mobilisation. Before you quit in a huff anyway just consider that in every cadre that turns up at RTMC there will be several people who are rejected for full time service on a variety (mostly medical) grounds. You really do have to sympathise with those guys who have made all their farewells and arranged their lives for a long absence only to slink back after only two weeks. It could be you mate. That and the already mentioned fact that you'll no longer get a Reservist Award to compensate you for the civvy wage that you no longer draw.

As mentioned already, why not join as a Regular? Whoever told you that you are too educated for service in the ranks is talking absolute horlicks. I have never heard of anyone being rejected for colour service for having too much education. Alternatively, unless their is a burning desire to go away for this particular tour (where exactly is 'cold and mountainous' anyway? Brecon?), why not go later down the line when you are in a position to take a year sabbatical?
 
#28
The reality is that if you're away for the best part of a year your employer will find a way to do without you. They have to, after all. Now, if they support you going then you're probably OK when you get back. (Probably as in as secure as anyone is in todays economic climate).

However, if they didn't want you to go then don't be surprised if when you return you get shunted off into a cul-de-sac while they wait for you to quit. They do not have to give you your old position back, they only have to give you a job. There's no redress against this, if a position is business critical then surely it's reasonable not to fill it with someone with a liability to be away one year in three ?

(The same argument can be made against women of child bearing age of course, but the law here is draconian in its severity against any employer suspected of discrimination. There is no equivalent protection for being in the TA. None, nada, zip, zilch - despite what the uninformed might tell you.)

Finally, put yourself in your bosses shoes. He's asked you not to go. He's explained why it drops him in the mire. He may well be happy to support your involuntary callup to defend the UK - he's not happy to support you for what is in his eyes a gap year jolly. So if you do go he will feel betrayed and let down - even if he appeals and wins he'll most likely be looking to source a replacement asap.
 
#29
... all of what you say is true. But during my interview I made it clear that I was in the TA etc... He said (at the time) it was fine - in fact he confessed to secretly harbouring 'dpm desires' himself and has always been keen to hear about the medical side of whatever exercises I've been on. It's just he's being tw@ because he's agreed to getting students and without me he can't supervise them properly. Then again - I may get biffed/pregnant/run-over by an egg truck tomorrow so this all angst maybe in vain. It's months away. Anything could happened between now and then - including peace!
 
#30
Depending on your unit/Mil trade I don't think you are too old to get a commission -I am sure MSR has the relevent info to hand

Edited to add: You were refering to a Reg commission, you may well be right -sorry
 

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