Career in IT/ Google IT support professional cert.

Hey you lot,

I'm considering a career in IT. I have had this idea on the back burner for a couple of years now but only recently acted on it.

Bit of background for you, I'm in my mid-thirties, obviously ex-army (infantry) and been doing an assortment of physical jobs since my army days ended some ten years ago.

Now I've been teaching myself a bit of HTML and just enrolled on an online course called 'Google IT support professional certificate'.
For those that don't know, it's a basic course to get you clued up to Helpdesk level

So, long intro.
What else can I do to prepare myself for an IT career? Full time college isn't an option.
Cheers.
 
Firstly what part of IT interests you?

IT support at the lower levels will be rather boring and repetitive, but areas application support will be more interesting and provides the opportunity if it's a specialist application to lead to consultancy or contract work later

But there are plenty of other options, networking and database administration is always in demand

Computer programming is a huge area

The main thing is practical experience, even working unpaid for charities in your spare time will probably count for more than low level IT certifications
 
Firstly what part of IT interests you?

IT support at the lower levels will be rather boring and repetitive, but areas application support will be more interesting and provides the opportunity if it's a specialist application to lead to consultancy or contract work later

But there are plenty of other options, networking and database administration is always in demand

Computer programming is a huge area

The main thing is practical experience, even working unpaid for charities in your spare time will probably count for more than low level IT certifications
Hey mate, killer questions.
Truthfully, I don't know which area interests me. But I do realise whatever area I go into, I'll be on the bottom rung and have to pay my dues.
Hopefully this course I am on will help me decide.

Great tip on the charity volunteering thing. I'll look into that. Should look good on my cv.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Avoid Development. You'll find yourself reading and trying to understand someone else's code that they thought self-explanatory so didn't provide comments.

Don't believe any comments. What they say might (but not necessarily) match the original code, but the last bastid that "fixed" it probably didn't update the comments.

Always comment your code clearly. It may be obvious to you, but you and the next person may interpret things differently.
 

Bob65

Old-Salt
There are a lot of certificates around - some are well respected and open doors, some make no difference whatsoever, and some will lead to doors being closed in your face! Fortunately there is a huge amount of free training around these days, EdX, Coursera, Microsoft Learn etc. Don't spend any money on anything until you've asked around and determined if it's a worth it. The biggest investment is time. Another way to get experience, if you do decide programming is for you, is to contribute to an open source project. Most are pretty welcoming and have a good community around them and will be a good source of contacts for job leads. Main website for that is called Github.
 
If you are going to take the development route, it won't be just one or two programming languages you'll need to learn. You'll need some practice with the database servers, application servers, UI design, JavaScript, C# - basically everything needed to get an application up and running.

Register an account with GitHub, find a hosting provider and develop your own site, and get Visual Studio installed.
 

Bob65

Old-Salt
Python is probably the closest thing to a universal programming language these days, it is used in every industry. Tons of free learning material around too. JavaScript is only used for websites, which is a very visible industry but it’s only a small corner of the entire programming world.
 
Either go CompTIA Route or CISCO
CompTIA qualifications are for life, Cisco renewed every 3 years.

We have CCNA in low/mid level jobs, CCNP in mid/high level & CCIE in high/senior levels.
CompTIA is a good qualification to have as is Cisco but CEH is also sought after as is LINUX certification.

Depends on what you want to in IT as some qualifications are better than others depending on work roles.
Even working in Logistics for an IT Cisco Tier 1 Gold Partner I'm CompTIA A+ & co worker is Cisco CCENT.

And we get paid more, just, than Junior IT Engineers starting out in the company but within 15 months most move on or get CCNA and ask for pay rise or leave. 1st Line also go, but CCNP/CCIE techs seem to stay but most on £50k to £70k+.
 

Mrs Slocombe

Clanker
Google IT support professional certificate - never heard of it, and neither has anyone else. No one has heard of CompTIA in the UK either. You'd be better off doing a City & Guilds.
 

Bob65

Old-Salt
Google IT support professional certificate - never heard of it, and neither has anyone else. No one has heard of CompTIA in the UK either. You'd be better off doing a City & Guilds.
The thing is, it’s ripe for p1ss-taking. I know it’s stupid and we’re all supposed to be professionals but it really happens. Even before its reputation was completely destroyed by those on the subcontinent, people would mock MCSE’s as “must consult someone experienced” and even guys who had earned it fair and square faced an uphill battle in some situations for credibility. I’d worry with such a cert people would say “what’s that, you google for the answers?” Like I say it’s dumb but that’s how it is. At least until a cert is well established.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
The thing is, it’s ripe for p1ss-taking. I know it’s stupid and we’re all supposed to be professionals but it really happens. Even before its reputation was completely destroyed by those on the subcontinent, people would mock MCSE’s as “must consult someone experienced” and even guys who had earned it fair and square faced an uphill battle in some situations for credibility. I’d worry with such a cert people would say “what’s that, you google for the answers?” Like I say it’s dumb but that’s how it is. At least until a cert is well established.
Googling is often the quickest way to get mainframe answers. 30 years ago, everybody had some of the reference books, every office could make up a full set. I joined an IBM mainframe team and there were no reference books. If you didn't know the answer and neither did your oppo, the SysProgs next door probably did. Or Google.

Kudos when I could answer a SysProg's question.
 

Latest Threads

Top