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Cardinal George Pell

There's others...
Please tell me that I've misread this. To hide her tip offs it was claimed that the information was found during searches of her law chambers. So the cover story used was that someone, presumably a magistrate or Aussie equivalent, has issued a search warrant for a barristers chambers and client confidential information was found during the search.

I'm lost for words.
 
The only thing dumber than trusting lawyers and judges is trusting Catholic priests. Both peddle fantasies, be it equality and justice under the rule of law, or the existence of a just and loving God who will reward you with an eternity in Heaven if you have faith in Him.

Believing in either fairy tale means you clearly haven't being paying attention to how the world actually works. ;)

But not Anglican, Methodist, Presbyterian or Shinto priests, Hindu mystics, Buddhism lamas, Jewish rabbis or Muslim imams (other religions/sects are available)? You obviously credit the Catholic clergy with almost magical powers of persuasion by comparison to their apparently feeble brethren.
 
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And, believe me, the barrister/informer element is not the worst of it.......not by a long chalk.

As I said, if it was a film script, nobody would believe it.
Try the NSW Crime Commission for size. A track record of infiltrating informers into organised crime, subsequently fucking up the investigation and then prosecuting their informer whilst the crime organisation carries on.

it never ceases to amaze me how institutionally bent Australia is. From local government (particularly developments and planning) through union corruption into politics. It’s hardly surprising Australian police are institutionally bent; they represent the society they are drawn from.

The case of Gary Jubelin is hot in the news locally; a star copper with a near celebrity reputation for nicking villains. He’s just been found guilty of illegally obtaining evidence in the case of a little boy who disappeared. The amount of noise about Jubelin being the victim of a witch hunt by senior police officers is unbelievable. The Cnut tried to fit someone up. IMHO he should be in jail and all of his other high profile cases should be investigated to see if bent evidence was submitted.

As for Pell, the right decision IMHO. BY all accounts he’s a quite horrible man and could well be an abuser, but the evidence put in front of the court was not conclusive.
 
Try the NSW Crime Commission for size. A track record of infiltrating informers into organised crime, subsequently ******* up the investigation and then prosecuting their informer whilst the crime organisation carries on.

it never ceases to amaze me how institutionally bent Australia is. From local government (particularly developments and planning) through union corruption into politics. It’s hardly surprising Australian police are institutionally bent; they represent the society they are drawn from.

The case of Gary Jubelin is hot in the news locally; a star copper with a near celebrity reputation for nicking villains. He’s just been found guilty of illegally obtaining evidence in the case of a little boy who disappeared. The amount of noise about Jubelin being the victim of a witch hunt by senior police officers is unbelievable. The Cnut tried to fit someone up. IMHO he should be in jail and all of his other high profile cases should be investigated to see if bent evidence was submitted.

As for Pell, the right decision IMHO. BY all accounts he’s a quite horrible man and could well be an abuser, but the evidence put in front of the court was not conclusive.
Yes Nsw seems to be the epicentre of state corruption in all forms closely followed by Victoria and Queensland. There have been so many bent pillows of both persuasions both state and federal from NSW. When in a brace but futile attempt to stem corruption in the police they brought in peter Ryan from the UK he discovered he was being bugged by his own senior officers and complaints department the only person he could trust was his ADC who he had brought with him
 
Yes Nsw seems to be the epicentre of state corruption in all forms closely followed by Victoria and Queensland. There have been so many bent pillows of both persuasions both state and federal from NSW. When in a brace but futile attempt to stem corruption in the police they brought in peter Ryan from the UK he discovered he was being bugged by his own senior officers and complaints department the only person he could trust was his ADC who he had brought with him
Dunno. My FIL was an independent councillor for one of the Perth cities for years. Has some really scathing views on low level political corruption at council level. I think it’s endemic across Australia.

The hidden graft paid to unions never ceases to amaze me and is one reason why I don’t work in the engineering sector any more. They’ve been replacing the water main into my local village recently; five people all on $70k or so standing holding traffic control lollipops whilst the same number work. Given that they’ve also go massive illuminated signs, why not use temporary traffic lights? Union graft.
 
This thread has turned into a fascinating subthread, probably worthy of a thread of its own. Like most people here I would have thought of Australia as a pretty well-run and highly developed place with excellent public facilities and advanced civic society and a superb police and criminal justice system, perhaps one of the best societies in the world if we gave it any thought.

Now I am not naive, I am fully aware that there are plenty of bent coppers and crooked politicians in the UK and Ireland but there seems to be a whole different "institutionalised" level being discussed here. There is a feeling that such corruption is endemic, pretty much everyone knows about it, a few bad eggs might get exposed every now and then but on the whole it's an accepted fact of life.

Am I reading far too much into this? Maybe we should even widen the discussion to corruption in the UK that we "all know about" and take for granted.
 
This thread has turned into a fascinating subthread, probably worthy of a thread of its own. Like most people here I would have thought of Australia as a pretty well-run and highly developed place with excellent public facilities and advanced civic society and a superb police and criminal justice system, perhaps one of the best societies in the world if we gave it any thought.

Now I am not naive, I am fully aware that there are plenty of bent coppers and crooked politicians in the UK and Ireland but there seems to be a whole different "institutionalised" level being discussed here. There is a feeling that such corruption is endemic, pretty much everyone knows about it, a few bad eggs might get exposed every now and then but on the whole it's an accepted fact of life.

Am I reading far too much into this? Maybe we should even widen the discussion to corruption in the UK that we "all know about" and take for granted.
Agree about councils and unions. Having worked in local government I have seen the way developers can control local pollies, apparently quite legally, they pay their election costs openly and then the councillor is guaranteed "pro development" unless of course the project negatively impacts on "their developer". Union corruption is totally institutionalised and hand in hand with organised crime. Many of the labour hire firms are fronts for bikie gangs and the wages on union run sites are ridiculous. The gate man and lift operators are earning more than the project engineers and are invariably related to the union rep.
 
Father of the said super-grass. Now you have some idea of the s**t-storm this has kicked up. The decision to put the heat on the barrister to inform arose during what was known as the Melbourne gangland wars - a turf war for control of the drug trafficking industry in Melbourne during the 90s' and early naughties, as she was representing some of those involved. See Melbourne Gangland Killings for a more detailed list of those involved. There was also a very good TV series based on it called "Underbelly" and I recommend a watch of the DVD of the series - it includes a lot more arousing material than the original broadcast.
Just glanced through that, the 36 killings were over a period of 12 years and were simply a case of one career criminal offing another. A bad situtation undoubtedly but hardly a crisis that justified undermining the very basis of the criminal justice system, unless of course the cops themselves were under pressure from their paymasters to sort the situation out.

But what I found most fascinating was the lovely combination of all the various communities, you have the Italians, the Irish, the Russians, the Greeks (Cypriots?) and of course plenty of fine upstanding Anglos (bikers?) all mixing it up, some in alliance some in opposition, it would make you proud to see how well the Aussie melting pot works. All they needed was the Mexicans and Triads to complete the picture.
 
Just glanced through that, the 36 killings were over a period of 12 years and were simply a case of one career criminal offing another. A bad situtation undoubtedly but hardly a crisis that justified undermining the very basis of the criminal justice system, unless of course the cops themselves were under pressure from their paymasters to sort the situation out.

But what I found most fascinating was the lovely combination of all the various communities, you have the Italians, the Irish, the Russians, the Greeks (Cypriots?) and of course plenty of fine upstanding Anglos (bikers?) all mixing it up, some in alliance some in opposition, it would make you proud to see how well the Aussie melting pot works. All they needed was the Mexicans and Triads to complete the picture.

Aussie Greeks aren't Cypriots.
 
Just glanced through that, the 36 killings were over a period of 12 years and were simply a case of one career criminal offing another. A bad situtation undoubtedly but hardly a crisis that justified undermining the very basis of the criminal justice system, unless of course the cops themselves were under pressure from their paymasters to sort the situation out.

But what I found most fascinating was the lovely combination of all the various communities, you have the Italians, the Irish, the Russians, the Greeks (Cypriots?) and of course plenty of fine upstanding Anglos (bikers?) all mixing it up, some in alliance some in opposition, it would make you proud to see how well the Aussie melting pot works. All they needed was the Mexicans and Triads to complete the picture.
You’ve left out the Albanians, Serbians, Somalians and Vietnamese. Not to mention the Maltese. And, of course, the cricketers (sand papering cheats that they are).

For the most part you don’t directly experience graft in daily life. But it’s there. Where you do see its effect is in public construction; road works that should take a few months take years. And there’s always people standing around on the payroll.

I walked away from a senior program management role in one of Aussie’s big make construction companies because I was fed up of union politics and threats. It’s pathetic really.

Our former local Labour MP was a union place man; he’d been top man in the AWU. Ended up in jail having used his union credit card to pay for toms.
 
Just glanced through that, the 36 killings were over a period of 12 years and were simply a case of one career criminal offing another. A bad situtation undoubtedly but hardly a crisis that justified undermining the very basis of the criminal justice system, unless of course the cops themselves were under pressure from their paymasters to sort the situation out.

But what I found most fascinating was the lovely combination of all the various communities, you have the Italians, the Irish, the Russians, the Greeks (Cypriots?) and of course plenty of fine upstanding Anglos (bikers?) all mixing it up, some in alliance some in opposition, it would make you proud to see how well the Aussie melting pot works. All they needed was the Mexicans and Triads to complete the picture.

I'm sure you'd find the Triads if you looked deeply enough!

I may be out of touch, but it's been my impression over the last 20+ years that Melbourne is the epicentre of gangland violence, which occasionally impacts 'civilians', but Sydney is the more dangerous place for 'casual violence' where any passer-by can become a victim.
 
Like @Mike Barton I assumed that Australia was a decent place with good public services, rule of law and corruption free. But about 10 years ago I went to stay with a mate who I'd served with. He and his family upped sticks and moved to Melbourne (South Yarra) and was a programme manager for a large construction firm. We were thinking about moving, too. But he regaled me with a number of incidents he'd encountered during his 18 months there: union strong arm tactics, shire planning officials 'on the take', political gerrymandering and anecdotal stories of police involved in organised crime.

His wife - a nurse - had to jump through all sorts of hoops to get registered, until it was suggested that she paid a facilitator to fix it for her (who would bribe officials to speed things up).

I was shocked by the level of institutional corruption that they encountered.Suffice to say I didn't move out there. My friends loved the lifestyle but the weather in Melbourne coupled with the stresses of the job saw them move to NZ. I popped out a while back to see them - Wellington's a great city (wierd weather) - and they are very happy there. Neither has encountered any corruption or bent activity and would never contemplate returning to Oz (or the UK). Alas I am too old and too ill to be a migrant in NZ but I'm planning a long trip back there over the Austral summer.

ETA a son if a friend was a restaurateur and bar owner in Sydney. He just about went out of business when the authorities decided to impose a late curfew on bars...but this ban excluded casinos. This had a strong whiff of OC/Political collusion.
 
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You’ve left out the Albanians, Serbians, Somalians and Vietnamese. Not to mention the Maltese. And, of course, the cricketers (sand papering cheats that they are).

For the most part you don’t directly experience graft in daily life. But it’s there. Where you do see its effect is in public construction; road works that should take a few months take years. And there’s always people standing around on the payroll.

I walked away from a senior program management role in one of Aussie’s big make construction companies because I was fed up of union politics and threats. It’s pathetic really.

Our former local Labour MP was a union place man; he’d been top man in the AWU. Ended up in jail having used his union credit card to pay for toms.
he left out the Lebanese too
 
he left out the Lebanese too
I was only going on the names I saw listed in the wikipedia page, I am sure every community is well represented in various forms of criminality. Among what appeared to be a Greek gang I noticed what appeared to be a Turkish name so that's what made me think of Cypriots.

Coming from Northern Ireland it is culturally ingrained in me to look at someone's name and then come to all sorts of prejudiced conclusions about them.
 
All states have their own peculiarities, South Australia which was not a convict state but formed through act of parliament for the South Australia company, based on ideals of political and religious freedom. However not for nothing is the City of Churches known as the City of Evil and Australia's murder capital. For many years the mysterious and very secretive "Family" allegedly controlled child prostitution and murders, nothing has even been proven but apparently very wealthy and well connected members of Adelaide Society.

South Australia was the last state to get an independent corruption commission and even now its activities are 'secret". An investigation into corruption into local government was quashed and the results never made public. The politician who made the call, a former union rep who allegedly received envelopes of cash from employees who wanted a package stated that it was not in the public interest. By pure coincidence the Council CEO now a state government executive is in the cross hairs of the commission, apparently.


 

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