Car cargo ship aground off the Isle of Wight

http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/...aground-deliberately-prevent-vessel-capsizing

I admit to total ignorance when it comes to bobbing about in boats etc, but I find this story pretty fascinating. I also appreciate the incident is on-going and there will be a robust investigation taking place, but it intrigues me how it has panned out so far. It seems that the crew (and the pilot boat) made an excellent call and deliberately ran the ship aground on a sandbank, when it became apparent that the cargo was making the ship unstable.
Roger so far, but how does a large cargo such as this become unstable in fair weather and within minutes of the ship leaving port? Seems like there is a very expensive cargo about to be written off, even if they manage to salvage the ship successfully. So, are there any experts out there who can enlighten me as to how this situation came about? Crew error? Port loading error?
Cheers.
 
Incorrectly loaded, wrong trim applied? I think even ships of this size have to have ballast pumped about to trim them.

Whatever it looks like a good call by the master. Everyone thought he was a cock for driving it onto a sandbank but it turns out he has probably saved the ship, its expensive cargo and kept the shipping channel open into one of the UK's major ports.
 
Incorrectly loaded, wrong trim applied? I think even ships of this size have to have ballast pumped about to trim them.

Whatever it looks like a good call by the master. Everyone thought he was a cock for driving it onto a sandbank but it turns out he has probably saved the ship, its expensive cargo and kept the shipping channel open into one of the UK's major ports.
What does 'wrong trim' mean in this context?
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
Local info has it that one of the two tugs didn't detach a cable when the ship was turning, made it rather unstable and realising there was a good chance of it going over they beached it on the known sandbar rather than risk it. Originally we all thought they'd made a massive cock up and tried cutting inside the buoy.
 
Without in any way wishing to prejudge what MAIB will get into, you can almost certainly assume some human error, possibly compounded by mechanical / electronic failure. It was blowing a hoolie on Saturday night so weather may well have come into it as well. All of which "may" have caused cargo to shift, leading to the decision to ground her. Which appears to have been an excellent choice!

Certainly looks impressive but wrong when you see it in the distance along the Solent.
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
I'm assuming this vessel is loaded the way I've seen the cars loaded before, all of them are chained in place, not just parked like on a cross channel ferry. I'd be surprised if any of them shifted .
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
Here is how I understand all cars to be stored on the ship
Inside%20a%20RoRo%20ship1.jpg
 
What does 'wrong trim' mean in this context?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ballast_tank

In order to provide adequate stability to vessels at sea, ballast is used to weigh the ship down and lower its centre of gravity. International agreements under theSafety Of Life At Sea (SOLAS) Conventionrequire cargo vessels and passenger ships to be constructed so as to withstand certain kinds of damage. The criteria specify the separation of compartments within the vessel and also the subdivision of those compartments.

The International agreements rely upon the states which have signed the agreement to implement the regulations within their waters and on vessels which are entitled to fly their flag. The ballast is generally seawater which is pumped into tanks known as ballast tanks. Depending on the type of vessel, the tanks can be double bottom (extending across the breadth of the vessel), wing tanks (located on the outboard area from keel to deck) or hopper tanks (occupying the upper corner section between hull and main deck).

These ballast tanks are connected to pumps which can pump water in or out. These tanks are filled in order to add weight to the ship once cargo has been discharged, and improve its stability. In some extreme conditions, ballast water may be introduced to dedicated cargo spaces in order to add extra weight during heavy weather or to pass under low bridges.
 

Seadog

ADC
If the centre of gravity of any (r) any vessel is above its metacentre due to too much top weight (incorrectly distributed cargo or liquids, icing, punters) it will be in a state of loll. It may look as if it is stable but a puff of wind, smally wave, 1degree of helm or a passing seagull taking a dump will end in tears.

I'm not saying that's what happened in this case, in fact I think it highly unlikely. There are other explanations for the vessel ending up on a sandbank including the conclusion that the MAIB will arrive at, which is the only one lurking journalists should report.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
I gather it has a consignment of bentleys onboard, they are rather heavy, plus lots of contstruction plant, thats sure to have broken loose under that sort of lean ?
 
I gather it has a consignment of bentleys onboard, they are rather heavy, plus lots of contstruction plant, thats sure to have broken loose under that sort of lean ?

Where was the ship bound? Middle East Armoured Bentley's for the Saudi Royal Family!! Wild speculation of course...

What won't be is pound to a pinch of poo the construction gear is probably now wedged up against the Bentleys which were on the Starboard side of the ship...

Must say it is an odd looking ship.. Seems there is hardly an elevated bridge so how can they like see stuff?

_80064381_80063687.jpg


Here it is in it's more traditional orientation... Must be a hell of a lot of blind spots. Notice the bridge wings are open to the elements...

Hoegh-Osaka-933097.jpg
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
it was off to Germany apparently
 
Having done a lot of powerboating around Bramble Bank, you can actually beach at low tide, get out and walk around. Its well known to yokels and there are Bouys all over, not to mention charts, electronic or paper. From some of the reports of its charted progess it turned to port suddenly in a place you wouldnt so i suspect something other than bad navigation. Shame im not back home as a quick trip out of Lymington in a 7.8m 250bhp RiB would definitely be on the cards!
 
Having done a lot of powerboating around Bramble Bank, you can actually beach at low tide, get out and walk around. Its well known to yokels and there are Bouys all over, not to mention charts, electronic or paper. From some of the reports of its charted progess it turned to port suddenly in a place you wouldnt so i suspect something other than bad navigation. Shame im not back home as a quick trip out of Lymington in a 7.8m 250bhp RiB would definitely be on the cards!

They mentioned on the News that there is an annual cricket match held on the sand bank, tides permitting of course!
 
If you want to know what the combination of a wet bulk cargo and foul weather can do, look for the MAIB report into the loss of the m.v. 'Lovat'.
Shocking.
 
They mentioned on the News that there is an annual cricket match held on the sand bank, tides permitting of course!

Old mate of mine used to work at the Hovercraft place on the IOW has shown me pictures of the annual event. He has played several times.

 

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