Cap badges, why cloth or metal??

#2
The Officers' tends to be wire braid and not cloth, therefore fancy as befitting their rank.
 
#3
Cloth badges have to be stitched on and as such are harder to lose.
Or not. :D
 
#4
RLC had a cloth capbadge for OR's we all had to have them in 1GS as the man above said harder to loose and break plus you could roll your beret right up and stick it in your belt hoops. Did get grubby pretty quickly though
 
#5
Possibly cost or ease of manufacture.

Without doing any research what so ever Regiments used to have embroidered badges, numbers and mottos on head dress, but despite cheap labour I supose it would still be time consuming.

Rank and file stamped metal badges cheap to produce, uniform and longer lasting.

Officers badges embroidered in gold and silver wire so more expensive therefore more fitting for their position and standing.

Maybe....or maybe some other reason.
 
#7
Before the introduction of Staybrite, the metal badges would have been brass and therefore needed polishing regularly. Given that a 2Lt has difficulty tying his boot laces, what chance would he have of parading with a shiny badge without Brasso all over his beret?
 
#8
I alway thought it was so you could recognise them at a distance and be ready to throw up a salute (or walk the other way!). I have absolutely no evidence to back this up, it's just my own little theory and I'm sure it's wrong!

Para Reg officers wear metal cap badges though...

Anyway, let them have their fancy cap badges, just keep them away from the maps!! :D
 
#10
LI officers used to have woven badges, but but now everyone serving in The Rifles wears the same staybrite badge, I believe. I don't know the history of the woven badge, but the suggestions posted above seem to make sense. I was told the move to all metal badges was cost.
 
#11
A couple slightly related questions, (apologises for the hijack)

Why did the black watch never wear their cap badge? That questioin maybe worded badly however I never saw them use it!

2ndly

Why do certain corps/regt have different cap badges if your commissioned or not? ie the Royal Engineers


Red
 
#12
Black Watch - don't know, but I bet someone here will.

The Corps of Royal Engineers was formed from two Corps, the Royal Engineers which was a corps of Officers, and the Sappers ans Miners. When they were amalgamated they retained two distinct cap badges. Or so I believe; standing by to be corrected.
 
#14
ah yes didnt even thnk about the Glengarrys

I heard that someone important like Queen Victoria took their capbadge away from them becuse they once took part in some rape, pillage and rape ('you said rape twice...I like rape')

just a random rumour wonder if anyone can clarify!



Red.
 
#15
brettarider said:
RLC had a cloth capbadge for OR's we all had to have them in 1GS as the man above said harder to loose and break plus you could roll your beret right up and stick it in your belt hoops. Did get grubby pretty quickly though
94 Loc Regt RA used to wear cloth capbadges that looked almost identical to an officers capbadge, oh the fun we had with visitors.

I loved my old badge, still have it somewhere
 
#16
red_phos said:
ah yes didnt even thnk about the Glengarrys

I heard that someone important like Queen Victoria took their capbadge away from them becuse they once took part in some rape, pillage and rape ('you said rape twice...I like rape')

just a random rumour wonder if anyone can clarify!



Red.
I suspect that is an urban myth, if Vicky (or more likely the government) took the capbadge away she/they would of disbanded the Regt and struck its name from the rolls
 
#17
Pitster said:
The Corps of Royal Engineers was formed from two Corps, the Royal Engineers which was a corps of Officers, and the Sappers ans Miners. When they were amalgamated they retained two distinct cap badges. Or so I believe; standing by to be corrected.

There's probably and element of truth in that, but below gives an account on the cap badge and where the "grenade" came from

The Cap Badge


Current RE cap badge (1953) In 1782 the device worn on officers' sword belts was the King's cypher with the crown over it. At some time later the cypher was surrounded by the garter, on which was placed 'Corps of Royal Engineers'. This was later changed again to simply 'Royal Engineers'. A similar device was worn on the breastplate of cross belts introduced for the Royal Sappers and Miners in 1823. It is not known when the laurel wreaths were added but it was probably in recognition of the work done by the Corps during the Napoleonic Wars (1809-15).

The Cap Badge was first used as a hat badge on the khaki helmets issued to troops during the Anglo-Boer War (1899-1902)

The design of the Cap Badge is the Garter and Motto surmounted by a Crown; within the Garter the Royal Cypher, which changes with each reigning monarch; without the Garter a wreath of laurel; on a scroll at the bottom of the wreath, the words Royal Engineers.

The motto on the Garter is Honi soit qui mal y pense (Evil to him who evil thinks).

In 1952 the colouring of badge changed from bronze to the current silver and gold style (see bottom left image).



RE Grenade

An embroidered grenade was first worn on the tail of an Royal Engineers Officer's full dress scarlet Goatee (jacket) in 1824. The following year a brass grenade was introduced for other ranks of the Royal Sappers and Miners. The grenade was later worn on the epaulet and then on the collar.

The number of flames to the grenade has varied, but in 1922 a nine-flamed grenade, with the motto Ubique (Everywhere) below it, was authorized. The Royal Artillery (RA) grenade is similar, but has only seven flames
I would like to point out that the "grenade" is in fact an artillery mortar shell, but of course we can't point that out to our wedgy brethren else they go off in a huff :wink:
 
#18
Re the RLC cloth badge for ORs. We had two badges, one metal and one cloth. It depended on the unit you was in which you wore, in training it was the cloth badge for everyday wear and the metal one for best.
In 4GS regt we not only had the standard RLC cloth badge we were also issued with a distinctive 4 regt one, same badge but it had a slightly different colour scheme.
Truly screwed people over though when I got attached to an inf unit when I mobilized as a reservist, I'd completely forgotten that I still had my 4 regt badge on my beret, I'd forgotten that it was any different to others. The inf coy I was sent to had just about got used to having regular RLC cap badges metal or cloth and then I wandered in, do you know how much hatred can be generated when a WOII and a C/SGT realise they've just saluted a Private.
Hell hath no fury like a CSM humiliated.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#19
One day I was tank-park-shuffling between hangars and squadron office, dressed in baggy green skin as usual, when a man in very smart number 2s with gallons of bright golden stuff on his shoulder comes around the corner.

We had been warned that some Guards battalion would be visiting because they had never seen CVR(T)s before and would be working with them at some point in the near future. My career out of training so far had consisted of a tour in Omagh and we had just moved to Tidworth where everybody wore baggy green skin all day and only officers ever wore Number 2s and we never saw them.

So I threw him one up. He threw one straight back and I continued on my way ... all of two paces before his mukker, identically-dressed came around the corner. So I threw him one up too, and he too threw one up back. "Fancy that," I was thinking to meself. "Two officers to salute in one day."

Then right behind them came a third. But this one also had a Lance Corporal stripe on his arm. WTF?!?!? He threw me one up. I was still staring, trying to work out wtf I was seeing when two dozen of them all came around the corner in quick succession. Every one of them threw me one up.

When I worked out that the first one had thrown one up in reply simply because he knew he could and could take the piss, then the second had seen the first as he approached the corner, then every one of them had seen the guy in front doing it, I had an entire platoon of Guardsmen taking the piss and marching off in the direction of the hangars.

I stood shaking my fist at them as they disappeared, but I'd been bliddy well stitched.
 
#20
Also in 70s cloth badges were issued in Northern ireland when berets were still worn, to stop the badge being hit back against the head, this ceased when the wearing of helmets became more widespread. It was also tried in the UL at the same time as a cost cutting exercise but they fell apart quickly so therefore cost more
 

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