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Can't pay, won't pay

#1
From Auntie

Greeks take a stand against unpopular property tax

As part of the Greek government's sweeping austerity measures, property owners are facing a tax which, if not paid within 80 days, means their electricity will be cut off. Chloe Hadjimatheou reports from Athens.
{snip}


One of those who cannot afford to pay the tax is 87-year-old Katerina Leta. She lives with her grandson, Tasos Dimitriadies, a mature student in a small apartment in north Athens.

Until now, they have never missed a payment. This month, Mr Dimitriadies has decided not to pay the electricity bill with the new property tax attached to it.

He says he cannot afford it and won't borrow the money because he is angry there is no exemption for people in his position.

"They are asking us to pay a tax that we paid when we bought the house and the constructor paid when he built the house," he tells the BBC World Service.

"Now we are being asked to pay it a third time or they will cut off our electricity. We feel we are being held hostage by the government," he says.
{snip}
The Greek government further alienated itself when Deputy Prime Minister Theodoros Pangalos, part of the government that devised the tax, told Mega TV channel that he could not afford to pay the €7,500 (£6,250, $9,785) bill for the many properties he owned.

BBC News - Greeks take a stand against unpopular property tax
My bold.

So, the "mature student" (aka professional scrounger from the state) can afford an Abercrombie and Fitch jumper but thinks he owes nothing back to the state for allowing him to be a professional student. He demands an exemption (note - he seems to accept others should pay) as he thinks it is his right to sit back and live on the state whilst other people - preferably German - school him for free.

And then there's the Deputy PM!!!! Hasn't got 7,500 quid to cover the tax bill on his "MANY" properties...

That just about says it all and explains why the Greeks should be allowed to sink without any help or relief from the rest of us.
 
P

PrinceAlbert

Guest
#2
I agree with him. If the UK gov asked me to do the same I'd be****ed off as well. Whatever I happened to be wearing.

Also - knowing Greece, it's probably knocked off fake shit.
 
#6
The sooner they sink the better, then maybe the can drag some of the other parasitic states with them.

This all just demonstrates that there should have been stricter controls on those wishing to adopt the Euro.
 
T

trowel

Guest
#8
The "holiday" countries should form their own club and stick to the only things they are good at i.e. producing olive oil, lemons, cheap booze, waiters, and cases of sunburn.
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
#9
This particular tax was to try and get round tax avoidance - the government's reasoning being that everyone needs to pay tax and thus they'll actually manage to raise some money because everyone has to pay electricity bills. The practical problem Greece has is that the whole tax system for the self employed/business owning class is so corrupt that it cannot be reformed. Of a population of 13 million only 50,000 will admit to earning over 80,000 Euros a year. Ditto for collecting business taxes - most business pay only a fraction of the money that is owed.

Yet all the fuss over the collection of this tax ignored a fundamental problem - the Greece economy way already fcuked when they joined the euro and its become steadily more fcuked as a result. Consider what would happen if everyone in Greece unhesitatingly did pay this tax:

1) Money would be sucked out of the real economy - putting businesses and individuals out of work because people had less money to spend in the shops, etc.
2) The money the government collects from taxes would correspondingly fall. That's a real swings and roundabouts situation - they raised more money in tax, but fcuked up many businesses in return.

For the past three years the Greek economy had been in a sustained depression. It is unlikely to ever improve while Greece is a euro member - unless the richer nations effectively give money to Greece to rebuild its shattered economy. And there's zero chance of that happening. As to the immediate picture - the Greek government is now totally dependent on EU loans. To keep the loans coming, they have to show they're taking steps to reform their corrupt tax system. This is a gesture in that direction, giving the EU an excuse to pay the next tranche of the loan. Will it solve the problem? No - but unpleasant truths have been postponed. The tin can has been kicked further down the road.

My personal guess is that Greece will become steadily more ungovernable in 2012 - the Greece population in general must be fully aware that they're trapped in a nightmare without an obvious exit. And when people feel they've nothing to lose by rioting, they become very dangerous indeed.

Wordsmith
 
#10
1) Money would be sucked out of the real economy - putting businesses and individuals out of work because people had less money to spend in the shops, etc.
2) The money the government collects from taxes would correspondingly fall. That's a real swings and roundabouts situation - they raised more money in tax, but fcuked up many businesses in return.

Wordsmith
...which is exactly the effect the tax take has in UK, and why the UK productive economy is tanking....
 
#14
When camouflage netting to hide swimming pools from the tax man is popular and a dentist can get away with claiming they earned The £4000 last year.
You want whizzy death tech of the military and enough bread and circuses to keep the proles from rioting and roads and stuff it costs tax.
 

Alsacien

MIA
Moderator
#16
And the bloke's a "mature student" - effectively a Greek scam to stay in higher education and continue drawing grants. Far better than working
I don't believe they get grants.
I was informed however, that students are regularly employed by the college/uni, so you could be a paid member of the students union committee for example......
 
#17
I agree with him. If the UK gov asked me to do the same I'd be****ed off as well. Whatever I happened to be wearing.
And thus amply demonstrating that many in UK society are also selfish, irresponsible scroungers who think that somebody else should pay for their non-contributory lifestyle choices.
 

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