Canadian Rangers Lee Enfield rifles to be sold off.

#81
Given that the primary threat/use is apparently supposed to be angry polar bears, I wonder why they didn't take the opportunity to go to a much heavier calibre? I know 7.62mm ball is relatively cheap, but I wonder what the Rangers might have preferred.

(For angry polar bear, I think I'd personally go for .458W in a semi-auto, with a drum magazine...)
Given that they're on the military strength, they'd have likely had to have gone through a whole testing and approval malarkey. Whereas 7.62x51 is adequate, and already in the system. Any potential value add for a different calibre will have been completely out of proportion to the bureaucratic and military effort required to adopt it officially.
 
#82
Given that they're on the military strength, they'd have likely had to have gone through a whole testing and approval malarkey. Whereas 7.62x51 is adequate, and already in the system. Any potential value add for a different calibre will have been completely out of proportion to the bureaucratic and military effort required to adopt it officially.

.338" from their C14 programme then?

That would certainly make a polar Bear's eyes water....
 
#83
.338" from their C14 programme then?

That would certainly make a polar Bear's eyes water....
And make paté of the Ranger's shoulder if fired from a carryable-all-day rifle...
 
#84
(For angry polar bear, I think I'd personally go for .458W in a semi-auto, with a drum magazine...)
They have been using the .303 for seventy odd years and managed fine.

Canadian military currently does not maintain a supply of .303 British to which to supply them, yet maintains large stocks of match grade .308
I read the Ruger Scout was looked at, but Canada was insistent that Colt Canada produce the replacement, so there were licensing issues that Ruger were not happy about.
I believe Colt Canada will produce the barrel, bolt and receiver under licence from Sako.
 
#85
They have been using the .303 for seventy odd years and managed fine.



I read the Ruger Scout was looked at, but Canada was insistent that Colt Canada produce the replacement, so there were licensing issues that Ruger were not happy about.
I believe Colt Canada will produce the barrel, bolt and receiver under licence from Sako.
All Canadian military firearms apparently have to be produced in Canada. Which is why they're still using shagged-out Inglis-made HiPowers.
 
#86
Or rather than just assuming, you could you know simply read the first post in the thread which says they will be given free of charge to those Rangers who want them (I can't imagine anyone turning that down) and some being turned into cadet drill rifles.

But why read posts in the thread when you can make up inflammatory posts about Muslims?
The chances are if the Enfields are given away to the Rangers, many will be sold/traded off privately in a fairly short order and make it onto the civi market. The Inuit I have dealt with over the years have always been willing to trade or sell quite eagerly, especially for tools,old snowmobiles, atv’s,and spares.

There were two announcements made, one was the start of delivery of the new rifles, and the other was the start of the process for buying replacements for the Twin Otters. This is why there were two sets of people there. Bombardier sold the rights for the Twin Otter (originally a de Havilland Canada design) to another company, Viking Air, who currently produce a modernized version. I would not be overly surprised if the replacement were to be new Twin Otters from Viking, as they seem to fill the requirements very well. I didn't mention the planes in my previous post as they were off topic for the thread.
Viking bought the OTC’s for all out of production DHC aircraft from the DHC 1 to the DHC 7 and now manufacture new T Otters as well as conversions for the original fleet and provide OEM parts worldwide. I’ve worked on Viking T Otter conversions as well T Beavers and have took the factory course and say without hesitation,they are better than the originals so the gov’t considering them is a given. Besides that, they give you free playing cards if you pass;).....
0738139A-792A-427E-99DE-A8125784AABF.jpeg
 
#87
All Canadian military firearms apparently have to be produced in Canada. Which is why they're still using shagged-out Inglis-made HiPowers.
They are using HiPowers because they are too cheap to replace them, not so much because of country of manufacture. The HiPowers are due to be replaced completely by 2026, so you can tell the priority sidearms take in the CF procurement process.....
 
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#88
Given that the primary threat/use is apparently supposed to be angry polar bears, I wonder why they didn't take the opportunity to go to a much heavier calibre? I know 7.62mm ball is relatively cheap, but I wonder what the Rangers might have preferred.

(For angry polar bear, I think I'd personally go for .458W in a semi-auto, with a drum magazine...)
They have to carry them around all day, so they don't want something that is heavy. Most of the Rangers are Inuit, and they know how to make sure that something becomes dead when they shoot it. 7.62 or .303 is probably the heaviest that any of the Inuit buy for themselves.

The Cree woman from Alberta in the picture below shot this Grizzly with a .22 rim fire single shot rifle in the 1950s.
 
#89
(...) Viking bought the OTC’s for all out of production DHC aircraft from the DHC 1 to the DHC 7 and now manufacture new T Otters as well as conversions for the original fleet and provide OEM parts worldwide. I’ve worked on Viking T Otter conversions as well T Beavers and have took the factory course and say without hesitation,they are better than the originals so the gov’t considering them is a given. Besides that, they give you free playing cards if you pass;)..... View attachment 346498
I've flown in Otters, Twin Otters, Turbo-Beavers, and DASH-7. I thought they were all good aircraft from a passenger's perspective.

I believe the Viking Air version of the DHC-5 Buffalo was considered as a replacement for the existing Buffalos used for SAR, but the decision was made to use a single type of aircraft as a cost saving and the Buffalo didn't have the range to handle long range Arctic missions from existing bases. The Buffalo is currently used in BC because the Hercules SAR aircraft were not considered to have adequate performance to operate successfully for SAR in mountainous terrain.

As for the Twin Otters, they're a legend and it's good to hear that Viking is doing a good job on them.
 
#90
They are using HiPowers because they are too cheap to replace them, not so much because of country of manufacture. The HiPowers are due to replaced completely by 2026, so you can tell the priority sidearms take in the CF procurement process.....
About 8 years ago the government of the day put out proposals to industry to acquire pistols. However, they stipulated that the design must be licensed to Colt Canada (who had bought Diemaco and renamed it) and built in Canada. Colt's own pistol designs were considered to be too crap to be worth considering.

This produced much consternation amongst other manufacturers who said they were interested in supplying pistols to Canada, but were not going to license their designs or technology to Colt, whom they saw as a competitor.

This all happened about 8 years ago, and the project rapidly went no-where and then died completely as the government took an axe to the defence budget and cancelled this as well as other defence projects. The above is my recollection of events, but I can't find a direct reference to it at this time, so I may have some of the details wrong but this is how I remember the general gist of it.

Plans to buy new pistols were revived about 2 years ago. I haven't seen anything yet which tells me what they plan on doing this time around.
 
#91
About 8 years ago the government of the day put out proposals to industry to acquire pistols. However, they stipulated that the design must be licensed to Colt Canada (who had bought Diemaco and renamed it) and built in Canada. Colt's own pistol designs were considered to be too crap to be worth considering.

This produced much consternation amongst other manufacturers who said they were interested in supplying pistols to Canada, but were not going to license their designs or technology to Colt, whom they saw as a competitor.

This all happened about 8 years ago, and the project rapidly went no-where and then died completely as the government took an axe to the defence budget and cancelled this as well as other defence projects. The above is my recollection of events, but I can't find a direct reference to it at this time, so I may have some of the details wrong but this is how I remember the general gist of it.

Plans to buy new pistols were revived about 2 years ago. I haven't seen anything yet which tells me what they plan on doing this time around.
Not sure about the entire CF, but earlier this summer a survey was circulated around the different battalions based at Pet. It boiled down to what you need a pistol for and what do you require in a pistol. The HiPowers are being cannibalized to keep serviceable (not a new thing) and the Sigs from the late 90’s have reached that point now as well.
 
#92
...and say without hesitation,they are better than the originals...

What's the word on the stories of corrosion/erosion in the compressor sections of the -34s and the call for building -27s again? Also heard the avionics are not crazy about harsh environments, particularly salt water, and one operator has handed back a couple of -400s they bought, or is considering doing so?

Last I spoke to MM he was waxing lyrical about the avionics, saying they were the same as the suite in the M1 Abrams. Wasn't convinced as the M1 is a sealed air conditioned environment while the Twotter is open to some really crappy conditions in daily use.
 
#93
What's the word on the stories of corrosion/erosion in the compressor sections of the -34s and the call for building -27s again? Also heard the avionics are not crazy about harsh environments, particularly salt water, and one operator has handed back a couple of -400s they bought, or is considering doing so?

Last I spoke to MM he was waxing lyrical about the avionics, saying they were the same as the suite in the M1 Abrams. Wasn't convinced as the M1 is a sealed air conditioned environment while the Twotter is open to some really crappy conditions in daily use.
Difficult question to answer because if I answer how I want to, it will give away who I was working for and I enjoy anonymity. I can say that the -34’s compressor sections on the Twotters held up the same as the KA90’s that had -34 conversions, both were land based operating in a non marine environment though. As for the glass cockpits, they held up well in dusty environments and no unusual snags cropping up.
 
#94
Agree, but the salt water environment is apparently doing some damage. Rumour is they're calling for -27s to be manufactured again (lighter on fuel too but less power available at high altitude) and the salt air is eating the guts of the Honeywell clown show. It's a Twotter FFS! Why does it need all those bells and whistles? Their sole purpose is to give tiny erections to low time smart phone addicts who can't navigate and don't know any better.
 

ugly

LE
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#95
They have to carry them around all day, so they don't want something that is heavy. Most of the Rangers are Inuit, and they know how to make sure that something becomes dead when they shoot it. 7.62 or .303 is probably the heaviest that any of the Inuit buy for themselves.

The Cree woman from Alberta in the picture below shot this Grizzly with a .22 rim fire single shot rifle in the 1950s.
She allegedly ambushed it by hiding behind a tree and brain shooting it as it walked past!
 
#97
You've got to admit that it would take nerves of steel to do that however.
Indeed.

Bella Twin, an Indian girl, and her friend Dave Auger were hunting grouse near Lesser Slave Lake in northern Alberta. The only gun they had was Bella’s single-shot bolt-action .22 Rimfire rifle. They were walking a cutline that had been made for oil exploration when they saw a large grizzly following the same survey line toward them. If they ran, the bear would probably notice them and might chase, so they quietly sat down on a brush pile and hoped that the bear would pass by without trouble. But the bear came much too close, and when the big boar was only a few yards away, Bella Twin shot him in the side of the head with a .22 Long cartridge. The bear dropped, kicked and then lay still. Taking no chances, Bella went up close and fired all of the cartridges she had, seven or eight .22 Longs, into the bear’s head. That bear, killed in 1953, was the world-record grizzly for several years and is still high in the records today.
“Grizzly Guns” by H.V. Stent:

My bold.

Edit;
Capture.PNG
 
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