Canadian Militia/Reserves

#1
Anyone had any experiences of them? Are they similar to us (TA), looking at the websites they seem more intergrated with the regular forces than we are and full time service seems to be expected.

Weird, I was looking into them and an internal (Canadian) job appeared in my Inbox. So is quality of life better there, would it be good for my kids etc.

Can you transfer across and keep rank (or would it be be better to initially get an attachment until I decided I was staying in Canada or not)
 
#2
polar said:
Anyone had any experiences of them? Are they similar to us (TA), looking at the websites they seem more intergrated with the regular forces than we are and full time service seems to be expected.

Weird, I was looking into them and an internal (Canadian) job appeared in my Inbox. So is quality of life better there, would it be good for my kids etc.

Can you transfer across and keep rank (or would it be be better to initially get an attachment until I decided I was staying in Canada or not)
Go for it mate think of the RESPOD.
 
#3
The Canadian regular and reserves are more closely integrated due to the small size of the Canadian military and its commitments. Unlike the UK, the Canucks have been using the reserves to bolster regular formations for decades. The battle of the Medak Pocket in Croatia Sept 1993 the PPCLI held the line against Croat advances and inficted heavy casualties on them. The unit won a citation for it, but what is generally not well known was that approx half the bn were reservists from across Canada.

If you want a good understanding of them try this book

All Tigers, No Donkeys: A Citizen Soldier in Croatia, 1994-1995, by Kurt Grant (who is still serving and is actually on his way to Bisley as I write!)

http://www.amazon.ca/All-Tigers-No-...5890416?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1182430405&sr=1-1
 
#4
My only experince of them is from a long trip to Wainwright treking area. I got the impression that troops lived in mixed sex rooms and they ran all their own training with 6 week courses

I was impressed by the Native citizens course with families driving for a week to see their children pass out...!
 
#5
Polar: There is a ton of info on the army.ca site on Brit expats joining the CF. You'll find enough info there to get you started with your questions with respect to conditions of enrollment, immigration concerns, citizenship requirements, BMQ requirements etc with lots of useful links to other sources. As for what appears to be a requirement to work full time with them it is and always will be, up to the member how much time you want to put in for. Keep in mind that there will be times when you will need to put the time in for your trade training and OJT as you progress through the ranks, trade quals etc. The trade, unit, and element will dictate those needs.

The GoC also has a number of websites that deal with living in Canada so try www.gc.ca (they'll have links to provincial and municipal sites for more info).

Unofficially, since I have lived in both Britain and Canada (and many, many places in between) I'd have to say each country has it's own strengths and weaknesses in it's living conditions, economics and education. It depends on what you really want to achieve. There's a ton of stuff I love about the UK and some stuff I didn't care for as there are things here that I love and dislike as well.

From a parent's perspective, I'd have to say my kid did alright here and she grew up a happy and reasonably well educated person. I have noticed that most young Canadian kids are much more globally aware than children from our pals in the south. The education system here tends to be very broad in its curriculum when it comes to world knowledge.

I spent 19 years in the CF and I loved every minute of it. However, I have equally as fond memories of my time in the Wrens. I have worked with both RegF members and PRes members and found both sides of our force to be highly dedicated pers.

At the moment, we have the best CDS that we've ever had and as such, he is leading us into a transformation that hasn't been seen since the 60s. It is exciting times for all of the CF.

I won't lie to you, we've had our dark decades of decay* and we're struggling to overcome those. We are lobbed transformational handgrenades on a weekly basis, but we are overcoming them. There's a reason why most CF members are pulling off their third decade of service, we are fortunate to have the best wearing the uniform and their committment to the CF is apparent regardless of times of bearing out the crappy junk they issued us with.

Anyway, if I can answer more specific questions, I'll try and if I can't, I'll hook you up with those that can.

*General Rick Hillier's address to the Conference of Defence Association, Feb, 2007
 
#7
Did an exchange with a platoon with the 48th Highlanders...based in Toronto...good lot, keen but need some tactics upgrades...
loads of fire power.....
and no idea how to use it..But the Troops are there just need new doctrine..
Still very nice...Very proud of their heritage...

this was before Afghan..so their deployment there might have changed things......
 
#8
Selected Canadian and United Kingdom reservists will now have the opportunity to
pursue their Reserve training and career while overseas for extended periods for
work or school commitments, thanks to a new Memorandum of Understanding (MOU)
between the Canadian Department of National Defence and the UK Ministry of Defence.
The MOU, allows a reserve member to continue their military development by joining a
unit similar to their own in the UK or Canada (as appropriate).

All members of the Primary Reserve or UK Reserve Forces relocating temporarily to
either Canada or the UK as a result of a job transfer or secondment with civilian
employers, or for purposes of attending an educational institution may apply under
the provisions of the MOU through their chain of command. You may read the news
release at:http://www.vcds.forces.gc.ca/cres_cdt/dres/pubs/compensation/newMOU_e.asp

Unfortunately, there is no current arrangement between our countries to facilitate a
direct Regular Force transfer thus you must complete the following:

Step #1

Eligibility requirements may vary for each occupation. There are, however, basic
eligibility requirements common to all occupations within the CF:

To be eligible for consideration for the Canadian Forces, you must meet the
following minimal conditions:

- Be a Canadian citizen. Citizens of another country who have landed immigrant
(Permanent Resident) status in Canada may also be considered for enrolment when the
CF has need of their skill, when a Canadian citizen cannot fill the position, and if
the national interest would not be prejudiced;

- Be 17 years of age (with parental/guardian consent) or older; junior level
Military College applicants must be 16 years of age; you may be enrolled in the
Reserves providing you are 16 years of age; and

- Meet the minimum education requirements for your entry plan and/or occupation.

If you would like more information about becoming a Permanent Resident of Canada
please go to the Citizenship & Immigration Canada website:

http://www.cic.gc.ca/

Step #2

If you do not hold Canadian citizenship but have Permanent Resident status you will
have to be granted a Citizenship Waiver by the Commander CFRG prior to starting any
of the selection testing. In order to do this, you must provide a curriculum vitae
(CV) or resumé to:

Canadian Forces Recruiting Group Headquarters
Attention: SSO Selection
Canadian Forces Base Borden
PO Box 1000, Station Main
Borden, Ontario
Canada
L0M 1C0

If you like, you can email your CV.

The CV/resume should include:

Personal Information
- Name (in full)
- Date and Place of Birth
- Brief outline of where you have lived (include dates)
- Where your immediate family is currently residing (include parent, siblings,
spouse and parents-in-law)
- Reasons for your relocation to Canada
- Date of arrival and date you were granted Permanent Resident Status

Education
- Name of all educational institutions attended
- Grade/Level completed and year of completion
- Diplomas/Degrees awarded
- Area of specialization
- Marks/Grade Point averages
- Apprenticeship/Journeyman qualifications

Employment
- List all part-time, summer or full-time employment positions you have held
- Dates for each position
- Brief description of duties for each position
- Qualifications or training you have received "on-the-job"

Activities
- List all volunteer positions you may have held
- List all clubs/organizations/community groups you have belonged to

If there are any other points or pertinent facts you would like to include, please
feel free to do so.

Once you have submitted your CV/resume, it will be assessed by CFRG to determine
what skills you possess that may be of benefit to the CF. We will be responding
only to those applicants who apply for occupations that are open for intake at this
time and who have experience in those fields. Your submission should have a cover
letter indicating which CF occupation you are applying for and highlighting the
experience relevant to that occupation. Please include your return address in order
that we may contact you.

You will not undergo any of the selection testing until you have been granted the
citizenship waiver.

Step#3

If you are granted a citizenship waiver and wish to apply you may do so online at
www.forces.ca.

The following link will take you to our website and the section which explains
exactly “How To Join.”

http://www.forces.ca/v3/engraph/resources/howtojoin_en.aspx?bhcp=1

Step #4

The CF Military Equivalencies Program recognizes equivalent non-CF training,
education and experience by granting CF qualifications. The CF accepts that
prospective recruits may have prior training, education or experience that may be
equivalent to that provided by military courses. Recognition of this prior learning
could save training resources and provide such a recruit with advanced standing.
Where prior learning might result in the granting of a CF equivalency a Prior
Learning Assessment (PLA) will be requested. If a partial entitlement is granted
then the applicant shall normally be posted to an appropriate site to complete the
remainder of the necessary training & education. If a full equivalency is granted
then the applicant will normally be posted to an operational unit for duty (in both
cases once basic military training is completed).

Should you have any additional questions or require an information package, please
contact us at the number below. The 1 800 number is only operational in Canada and
will connect you to the recruiting centre nearest you.
You won't find that online... hope it helps
 
#9
Crabby do we have a similar one with the Aussies (Have been looking up units at one of our other offices ... Aussues reserve far better trained/equiped than we are)
 
#10
polar said:
Crabby do we have a similar one with the Aussies (Have been looking up units at one of our other offices ... Aussues reserve far better trained/equiped than we are)
I *believe* that we do eg our regt has an exchange officer, but I couldn't find any detail on the official Australian army reserve website here.

I did notice that, strangely, they have a facility whereby if you are, say, interested in joining, you can easily find your nearest unit. How bizarre!
 
#11
If anyone is interested there is a similar scheme available to train with the US National Guard. I'm heading over to the states for 5 months later this year and will be continuing my TA training with a NG unit. I simply get them to authorise an attendance register and fax it back to my TA unit, then get paid (eventually I guess, what with the JPA issues).
The process of sorting it out has been fairly quick, although I suspect this was down to me doing the majority of the legwork. I approached NG units in the area to make informal enquiries (March/April). Once I found a unit willing to take me, I approached the SO3 G3 in the British Defence Staff in Washington D.C. (April/May) and he assisted in pushing the request to train through The Pentagon and HQ Land. Obviously my Adjt was kept in the loop at all times, so when the paperwork from Land arrived (late May) on his desk it wasn't a complete surprise! Approval from Land arrived at the beginning of this month (June).
 
#12
ssupersixfour said:
I did notice that, strangely, they have a facility whereby if you are, say, interested in joining, you can easily find your nearest unit. How bizarre!
I thought that too :twisted: Although DrEvils site is already better than all of them (he needs more locations before he goes live/public, so if you want to add your unit PM me and I'll send you the link)
 

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