Canadian Elections Around The Corner . . .

October 21st, 2019 is the day . . .

The country is somewhat divided. Even people who got JT elected are now not sure if he's who he is. With rental costs skyrocketing across the country, unfulfilled promises and recent scandals (Against women) within the government itself, this might be the end of Trudeau.

The conservatives sound like typical politicians and the green party isn't big enough yet.

Where will this country go?

Any Canadians in the house?
 
Fingers crossed the Conservatives will prevail next month.
 
October 21st, 2019 is the day . . .

The country is somewhat divided. Even people who got JT elected are now not sure if he's who he is. With rental costs skyrocketing across the country, unfulfilled promises and recent scandals (Against women) within the government itself, this might be the end of Trudeau.

The conservatives sound like typical politicians and the green party isn't big enough yet.

Where will this country go?

Any Canadians in the house?
Erm,... I am not Canadian so forgive me if I am off the mark but if the conservatives are sounding like "typical politicians," does that mean the liberals under JT are acting like "typical politicians" (unfulfilled promises and recent scandals)?
 
Rex Murphy is one journalist that has not bought in to the "Sunny Days" of Trudeau. He keeps up a constant commentary on the EM directed escapades of our trust fund part time PM, drama teacher, would be ski bum, and groper of female journalists. I rather like the description of the Australian columnist Rita Panahi, calling him the “Kim Kardashian of political leaders; an all-style, no-substance bimbo with all the depth of a puddle.”


Once again the wild talk of exit from the Confederation of Canada is beginning to permeate Alberta, probably the most we have ever had in common with Quebec.
 
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It really matters not a wit in Alberta, the ruling party of Canada will already have been picked before the polls close in Alberta. Ontario and Quebec seem to have carte blanche with regard to Central Canada's hold on power, with total disregard for the West, with, of course the yoghurt knitting tree worshipping hippies in BC being an exception.
 
First I should note that the write has not actually been dropped yet, although it is expected within the next few days to a week.

Second, the two political stories of note are that the People's Party don't seem to be making much headway, and the NDP appear to be in a slow motion collapse.

The People's Party are a new party, founded by Maxime Bernier, one of the top members of the Conservative Party when he split with them after the leadership convention. He led the field through most of the rounds of voting, being barely beaten by Scheer in the last round. Scheer was the candidate of the party establishment.

We'll have to see if they can make more headway once the campaign actually gets under weigh. They have no chance of forming the government, and if they don't succeed in getting any candidates elected then their main effect may be to syphon off some votes from the Conservatives in marginal seats.

The bigger political news seems to be the slow motion collapse of the NDP. Their new leader, Jagmeet Singh, seems to be under the impression that the way to win elections is to appeal to party activists instead of the public at large. As a result of this, he has been doing a very good impression of the Invisible Man to most of the potential electorate. Before jumping into federal politics he was a provincial MPP in Ontario for a number of years. I'd never heard of him during his time in provincial politics.

The NDP's support has been collapsing at the federal level and candidates and members have been jumping ship for the Green Party en masse. The NDP's fundraising has also collapsed, and they are in a difficult position with respect to coming up with the money to fight a national election. As a result of this the Green Party may do surprisingly well in this election.

Given how wrong I was about the last election, where I didn't think that Trudeau had any real chance of winning a majority, I'm not going to make any predictions on who is going to win this one other than it will be either the Liberals (currently in government) or the Conservatives (currently the official opposition).

It won't be won by the NDP, who since the last election went from official opposition (the Liberals were in third place) under Mulcair to dire straits today.

The People's Party will struggle to win any seats even if they do well in the popular vote, as their vote is spread pretty evenly without the sort of regional concentration that allows minor parties to win.

The Green Party may get a couple of seats in the Lower Mainland of BC (Vancouver and area), and in the Maritimes. The former is where long standing Green Party leader Elizabeth May is located, and has a concentration of Green support (Vancouver and the Gulf Islands being full of pot smoking hippies).

In the Maritimes the Green Party may gain at the expense of the NDP due to membership disenchantment with how the NDP is currently being mismanaged.

Many former NDP voters in the Maritimes, Quebec, and Ontario though are more likely to jump ship to the Liberals however, as a lot of them can't stand Green Party policies.

The election will be won or lost in Ontario (by far the largest province) and Quebec (the second largest). Both the Liberals and the Conservatives have the largest number of their seats in Ontario, and elections are often won or lost in the suburbs around Toronto.

The NDP has their largest number of seats in Quebec, but that is a recent phenomenon and historically they had little or no presence there, so seeing them haemorrhage seats would not be too surprising.

Here's the current seat standings by province.
partystandings.png


About the only thing that I think can be said with any certain about the upcoming election is that Alberta and Quebec with both whinge about it, an activity that the two have achieved world class status in through many years of practice.
 
Rex Murphy is one journalist that has not bought in to the "Sunny Days" of Trudeau. (...)
It's "Sunny Ways", not "Sunny Days". It's a reference to Sir Wilfred Laurier and how he addressed the Manitoba Schools Question in the late 19th century. The premier of Manitoba was going full retard and Laurier wanted everyone to calm the f*ck down before restarting the Red River Rebellion. The expression came from one of Aesop's Fables.

Trudeau made a few oblique references to it during the election where he positioned himself in contrast to Harper, who had a sudden brainstorm that the way to pick up a few marginal seats in Quebec was to send out a couple of minions to run around screaming "THE DUSKY COLOURED MOOSE-LIMBS ARE GOING TO MURDER US ALL IN OUR BEDS". Needless to say Trudeau's approach of keeping his response to this calm and reasonable and not getting drawn into a debate on this on Harper's terms went over better with the electorate.
 
Nice insights guys. Yeah I voted NDP and then out of nowhere, the leader retires midway . . . This year, I'm TOTALLY undecided . . . *Sighs*.
 

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October 21st, 2019 is the day . . .

The country is somewhat divided. Even people who got JT elected are now not sure if he's who he is. With rental costs skyrocketing across the country, unfulfilled promises and recent scandals (Against women) within the government itself, this might be the end of Trudeau.

The conservatives sound like typical politicians and the green party isn't big enough yet.

Where will this country go?

Any Canadians in the house?
You are coming on to a UK based social media forum to complain your country is politically divided! Have you heard of Brexit?

Fecking lightweights. :flower:
 
It's "Sunny Ways", not "Sunny Days". It's a reference to Sir Wilfred Laurier and how he addressed the Manitoba Schools Question in the late 19th century. The premier of Manitoba was going full retard and Laurier wanted everyone to calm the f*ck down before restarting the Red River Rebellion. The expression came from one of Aesop's Fables.

Trudeau made a few oblique references to it during the election where he positioned himself in contrast to Harper, who had a sudden brainstorm that the way to pick up a few marginal seats in Quebec was to send out a couple of minions to run around screaming "THE DUSKY COLOURED MOOSE-LIMBS ARE GOING TO MURDER US ALL IN OUR BEDS". Needless to say Trudeau's approach of keeping his response to this calm and reasonable and not getting drawn into a debate on this on Harper's terms went over better with the electorate.
Yes, I know, however, I said "Sunny Days".
 
Fingers crossed the Conservatives will prevail next month.
67688450_10162105895830201_8734648146329600000_n.jpg

Sadly, the Tories have an uphill fight in this upcoming campaign. Trudeau offering a $500 million subsidy to print media has pretty much dropped about 3/4 of opinion piece writers into his pocket.
 
Nice insights guys. Yeah I voted NDP and then out of nowhere, the leader retires midway . . . This year, I'm TOTALLY undecided . . . *Sighs*.
Mulcair didn't decide to "retire", the party kicked him out in a fit of pique over losing. As I understand it the party delegates who voted him out thought they could express their rage and frustration in a protest vote against him without consequences, and were as shocked as anyone else when he lost.

His predecessor Jack Layton was well regarded as being a "nice guy" and as being likeable (in stark contrast to his wife Olivia Chow, or so I hear), but many people had questions about his ability to lead a government. He none the less built up a lot of support for the party, particularly in Quebec.

Mulcair had been prominent in Quebec politics as a Liberal, holding several cabinet positions under Charest, and when he left provincial politics the Conservatives and the federal Liberals were both trying to recruit him. He went with the NDP however, where he rose to the top very quickly and took over after Layton passed away. They will be hard pressed to find another leader with as much credibility as he had.

I was surprised though that when the party held their leadership convention to replace Mulcair they went with Singh rather than Charlie Angus. Angus was well known and had been prominent in the federal party for quite some time, while Singh came out of obscurity.

As I said previously though, Singh seems to focus on appealing to party activists rather than appealing to the public. I recall seeing him being questioned by the press on the pipeline fight between Alberta and BC and he was crumbling under pressure and waffling badly trying to avoid offending either the NDP in Alberta (who wanted the pipeline) and the NDP in BC (who didn't want it). It was the most obvious question to come up in an interview, yet he seemed completely unprepared for it and unable to answer off the cuff either.

Given their current leadership and state of finances, I expect the NDP will do badly this time around.
 
Rex Murphy is one journalist that has not bought in to the "Sunny Days" of Trudeau. He keeps up a constant commentary on the EM directed escapades of our trust fund part time PM, drama teacher, would be ski bum, and groper of female journalists. I rather like the description of the Australian columnist Rita Panahi, calling him the “Kim Kardashian of political leaders; an all-style, no-substance bimbo with all the depth of a puddle.”


Once again the wild talk of exit from the Confederation of Canada is beginning to permeate Alberta, probably the most we have ever had in common with Quebec.
Ms. Panahi has a much higher opinion of him than I do.
 
Mulcair didn't decide to "retire", the party kicked him out in a fit of pique over losing. As I understand it the party delegates who voted him out thought they could express their rage and frustration in a protest vote against him without consequences, and were as shocked as anyone else when he lost.

His predecessor Jack Layton was well regarded as being a "nice guy" and as being likeable (in stark contrast to his wife Olivia Chow, or so I hear), but many people had questions about his ability to lead a government. He none the less built up a lot of support for the party, particularly in Quebec.

Mulcair had been prominent in Quebec politics as a Liberal, holding several cabinet positions under Charest, and when he left provincial politics the Conservatives and the federal Liberals were both trying to recruit him. He went with the NDP however, where he rose to the top very quickly and took over after Layton passed away. They will be hard pressed to find another leader with as much credibility as he had.

I was surprised though that when the party held their leadership convention to replace Mulcair they went with Singh rather than Charlie Angus. Angus was well known and had been prominent in the federal party for quite some time, while Singh came out of obscurity.

As I said previously though, Singh seems to focus on appealing to party activists rather than appealing to the public. I recall seeing him being questioned by the press on the pipeline fight between Alberta and BC and he was crumbling under pressure and waffling badly trying to avoid offending either the NDP in Alberta (who wanted the pipeline) and the NDP in BC (who didn't want it). It was the most obvious question to come up in an interview, yet he seemed completely unprepared for it and unable to answer off the cuff either.

Given their current leadership and state of finances, I expect the NDP will do badly this time around.
Maybe you guys need a Trump to "shake it all up" and be douche. Would be a nice counter to the U.S. Trump...
 
It really matters not a wit in Alberta, the ruling party of Canada will already have been picked before the polls close in Alberta. Ontario and Quebec seem to have carte blanche with regard to Central Canada's hold on power, with total disregard for the West, with, of course the yoghurt knitting tree worshipping hippies in BC being an exception.
Please do not lump those of us north of Hope in with the Fraser Valley and the Island.
 
Please no... It says a lot about the current state of affairs when the Mexican President is the only adult head of Govt in North America.
I thought it would be nice to have a Canadian Trump north of our border to say "we need to build a wall and let the U.S. pay for it."
 

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