Canadian dressing stations in WW1 Bapaume

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
#1
I am trying to find out a little more family history, my grandfathers twin was shot by a german sniper at Bapaume, during the first major battle there
a letter in possession of the family states that his body was handed over to the Canadians to take care of
is their any way I can locate the Field Dressing stations, and would his name be listed on their records ?
his records were lost in the Blitz unfortunately
regards Slocum
 
#2
If ARRSE is back on line, this might not be much help but since you mention first Bapaume, I assume you mean the Spring Offensive 1918. The Casualty Clearing Station could have been No. 49 or No. 45, at Achiet-le-Grande, a village in the Arras district, Nord Pas de Calais and quite close to Bapaume. Field dressing stations were the first port of call behind the lines, the Canucks would have been under Byng after Vimy Ridge. There's a communal cemetery there now, Results.

You could try these locations of hospitals and CCS for the B.E.F. in WWI: Location Of WWI Hospitals And Casualty Clearing Stations | British Expeditionary Force | Great War | Medical Front WWI. Or casualties, Achiet-le-Grand during ww1.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
#3
many thanks
he has no known grave, but the letter says that he was shot at they were heading North and the Canadians looked after his body
its quite likely that the original burial place was destroyed by shelling
I am going back over in a few weeks so I would like to look closer
 
#4
many thanks
he has no known grave, but the letter says that he was shot at they were heading North and the Canadians looked after his body
its quite likely that the original burial place was destroyed by shelling
I am going back over in a few weeks so I would like to look closer
Best of luck to you. According to Major-General Sir W. G. Macpherson, VOL. Ill, Medical Services during the Operations on the Western Front in 1916, 1917 and 1918 ; in Italy; and in Egypt and Palestine: light railway sidings were prepared at No. 45 and No. 49 C.C.Ss, at Achiet-le-Grand. The lines ran up to the main dressing station at Favreuil, north of Bapaume. The main dressing stations were at Beugny and Favreuil, the latter being closer.
 
#5
The higher formation diarys sometimes include the evacuation chain. You won't find individual names but it may give clues why the Canadians got involved and what unit.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
#6
A few years ago ( well at least ten) I read an article in the Times about a chap who had been working in Bosnia on tracing the remains for the court case, when he got back to the Red Cross in Switzerland and handed his papers over, the chap asked him what he was going to do now, oh try to find my grandfather as his records were lost in the second world war
the Swiss chap replied but we have all the original casualty records here, there was mention of them being scanned and digitised, but I did not hear anything more ?
 
#7
A few years ago ( well at least ten) I read an article in the Times about a chap who had been working in Bosnia on tracing the remains for the court case, when he got back to the Red Cross in Switzerland and handed his papers over, the chap asked him what he was going to do now, oh try to find my grandfather as his records were lost in the second world war
the Swiss chap replied but we have all the original casualty records here, there was mention of them being scanned and digitised, but I did not hear anything more ?
Apparently the Canadians digitised WWI medical, admissions, deaths and discharge records - scheduled to be completed by the end of next year.

Veterans' 'Death cards' for WWI are also available from the usual sources; it's entirely possible that your man has a record of some sort, in archives, even if some were lost at Kew. As @Welch Man pointed out, diaries may be fruitful, and some of those will be digitised too, in searchable databases. The IWM also has info on the 1918 Spring Offensive @ THE GERMAN SPRING OFFENSIVE, MARCH-JULY 1918 (Q 8596).

British veterans and casualties aren't normally included in the Canadian databases, but you never know. The good news is the allied hierarchy was imperial, so the records will all be in English .

A really long shot, you could also try British Army medal index cards 1914-1920 - The National Archives. Forces War Records: Military Hospitals Admissions and Discharge Registers for WW1, and National Archives ref MH106. Also the CWGC and Hospital admission and discharge records of 1914-1918. Probably have to visit the archives as they may not be digitised.
 
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Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
#8
Many thanks for all your help
His death was unknown to the family as my grandfather never spoke of his twin brother other than to say he died young
 
#10
No help to you at all, but I have a few items to do with an 18 yet old shot in the head (allegedly sniped) in July 1918 when his unit were in the front line in the Hinges/Choque area, & who died a few days later at No. 4 Canadian Casualty Clearing Station at Pernes (No. 1 & No 4 Canadian CCS were in that area April - July 1918.
Included in the grouping is a letter from a Canadian army Chaplain to the kids mother informing her that he'd died 5 days after "the bullet penetrating the skull into the brain, above the left eye", never having regained consciousness.
 
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#11
No help to you at all, but I have a few items to do with an 18 yet old shot in the head (allegedly sniped) in July 1918 when his unit were in the front line in the Hinges/Choque area, & who died a few days later at No. 4 Canadian Casualty Clearing Station at Pernes (No. 1 & No 4 Canadian CCS were in that area April - July 1918.
Included in the grouping is a letter from a Canadian army Chaplain to the kids mother informing her that he'd died 5 days after "the bullet penetrating the skull into the brain, above the left eye", never having regained consciousness.
This is interesting as i had a great uncle who died at Pernes ccs 29th july 1918 who was at Choques and Hinges and is buried at Pernes british cemetary which i visited 29th july this year.
41107 J Hayes KORLR
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
#12
Well after a little trip earlier this year, and the assistance of a few other members of this fine forum, I reckon I have narrowed it down, after checking with a local historian it would appear that bodies handed over were buried and recorded in a book, however the day his body was handed over was the worst day ever, the Germans were moving very rapidly ( operation Micheal) and later that same day took the area, the Canucks were busy moving the wounded onto trains and getting them away
the Kaisers mob destroyed everything, a real rampage, wells poisoned, buildings demolished, the entire hospital burnt to the ground, so any records would most likely have perished then
it would be nice to see if anything turns up, at the moment I am waiting for a relative to locate the origional letter and I will scan it up
it was an emotional visit to Achiet Le Grande, and even 100 years later so much is recognisable from those old images
the railway station is still present complete with a few bullet marks, I presume they left that alone as they wanted to use the railway line
1374.JPG
 
#13
Well after a little trip earlier this year, and the assistance of a few other members of this fine forum, I reckon I have narrowed it down, after checking with a local historian it would appear that bodies handed over were buried and recorded in a book, however the day his body was handed over was the worst day ever, the Germans were moving very rapidly ( operation Micheal) and later that same day took the area, the Canucks were busy moving the wounded onto trains and getting them away
the Kaisers mob destroyed everything, a real rampage, wells poisoned, buildings demolished, the entire hospital burnt to the ground, so any records would most likely have perished then
it would be nice to see if anything turns up, at the moment I am waiting for a relative to locate the origional letter and I will scan it up
it was an emotional visit to Achiet Le Grande, and even 100 years later so much is recognisable from those old images
the railway station is still present complete with a few bullet marks, I presume they left that alone as they wanted to use the railway line
View attachment 354446
Excellent!
 
#14
Stunning bit of work Joshua Slocum.
My Great Aunt an Assistant Matron in the QAIMNS was working at CCS 3 on the Somme (Gezaincourt) when it was overrun during the Spring Offensive and was awarded an MID for her efforts.

This might be of interest taken from the Gezaincourt Communal Cemetery Extension, Somme, France
The COMMUNAL CEMETERY at Gezaincourt contains nine Commonwealth burials of the First World War, made between October 1915 and March 1916

The adjoining EXTENSION was opened in March 1916 and used until March 1917, and again from March to October 1918. In most cases, the burials were carried out from casualty clearing stations and, in June to August 1918, from the 3rd Canadian Stationary Hospital.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
#15
A few more pics now I have reduced them in size

the old dressing stations were to the left of this field, now peaceful, its a difficult to find cemetery, but once you know it is located behind the village cemetery its easier to find
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the
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Attachments

#16
@Joshua Slocum Have you tried Great War Forum They helped me to research SWMBO's Great uncle, even down to the place he was buried after being shot before being moved to the military cemetery.
1537869358391.png

yellow cross marks the spot.
1537869539205.png
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
#17
When standing at the highest point of the cemetery you could see another CWWG site about half a mile away, it took us some time to locate as Railway line cuts through the road, and even with a Michelin map it was not easy but its worth finding, again you park by the communal cemetery walk across the main railway line turn right and about half a mile along its tucked away, a most unusual layout, almost like a rail line itself

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Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
#18
@Joshua Slocum Have you tried Great War Forum They helped me to research SWMBO's Great uncle, even down to the place he was buried after being shot before being moved to the military cemetery.
View attachment 354526
yellow cross marks the spot.
View attachment 354527
Yes thank you, I joined the Forum, it has however a fair share of let us say odd people !! one chap was convinced that my great Uncle was buried at Bapaume Cemetery, he also has a rather large collection of items that should have been left to EOD in France !!!! however they were driving away when he was shot, and the letter says his body was given to the Canadians to take care off, they were taking the injured back and collecting ammo and food, he has no know grave due to the Germans taking the area the same day, so no records so far exist, when the Kaisers lot were kicked out, they extended the cemetery and buried all the unknowns there on the left hand side, I know my Great Grandfather visited as he worked there post war, my Grandfather never went back, ever, or attended any memorials service, nor would he have any mention of the war in his house !
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
#19
I was hoping to take my elderly father over this year, however he managed to brain himself once again, so was not fit, I am planning to take him over in November, my younger brother managed a visit on the return leg of his motorbike tour, and my cousin also visited, but its going to be difficult
if he karks it beforehand, I am taking his ashes and dumping them there !! hes given me the dosh for the trip !!
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
#20
@Joshua Slocum Have you tried Great War Forum They helped me to research SWMBO's Great uncle, even down to the place he was buried after being shot before being moved to the military cemetery.
View attachment 354526
yellow cross marks the spot.
View attachment 354527
Its quite humbling when you visit !, when I first found out about Grandads identical twin I was speechless, I didnt tell my father initially, but went and located his name on the memorial of the missing at Arras
Later on I took him to visit, quite an emotional day, I also took my younger brother and later on my Nephew
its taken me 16 years to find everything out, even in this computer age its not easy, you need to study many books and documents, and then tread the ground yourself had visited Bapaume once before, but until I found Achiet and toured around none of the documents made sense
its like having a map and walking the area, you can visualise it but once there all the places and sights become familiar
 

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