Can you join as a Regular then later on go to Sandhurst?

Terrafir

Crow
Right genuine question. Can someone join the army as a regular soldier then later on in your career, whilst still being in the army, go to Sandhurst and become and Officer?
 
Yes. Ex rankers go to RMAS to become DE officers each intake. There is a process that starts with recommendations from your CO, through AOSB Briefing, a Development Course and then AOSB Main Board

Competition is tough!

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Dalef65

Old-Salt
Yes you can.....Or to put it another way, there is no rule to say you can't.

However in practice, you might find some obstacles being put before you that you didn't envisage. Not all of them official, not all of them "fair".

Not quite understanding this idea that seems to be becoming more prevalent, that one would enlist as an OR and then simply assume that he/she can take a commission on a whim.

As I said to someone else on another thread, if you have the aptitude / qualification / wherewithal / intent / ability (whatever you want to call it) to go for a commission, then you should do so from the get go.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
For information - the Royal Marines have/had a parallel system which they refer to as ' a Corps Commission' .

The difference is that both RM other ranks and officers attend initial training at CTCRM.

Not sure whether Corps Commission candidates , having already achieved their green lids, have to go through the whole syllabus again.

You would have to ask a serving RM ocifer :)

I would say that much depends on what you want to DO most of all ?

Plan, organize,monitor,control,evaluate?

Or fix things, drive things, cook things,break things - and carry water ?

As a SNCO/officer you will do more of the first rather than the second. Both have their merits.
 
For information - the Royal Marines have/had a parallel system which they refer to as ' a Corps Commission' .

The difference is that both RM other ranks and officers attend initial training at CTCRM.

Not sure whether Corps Commission candidates , having already achieved their green lids, have to go through the whole syllabus again.

You would have to ask a serving RM ocifer :)

I would say that much depends on what you want to DO most of all ?

Plan, organize,monitor,control,evaluate?

Or fix things, drive things, cook things,break things - and carry water ?

As a SNCO/officer you will do more of the first rather than the second. Both have their merits.
They do have to do the whole thing. We had one on my course. They’re a valuable asset to have in any YO Batch. Ours went on to become a Brigadier.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Three letter name beginning with F ? :)

( seemed like a good guy, came close to telling 2SL (Brighouse) not to be so ignorant....)
 

needlewaver

War Hero
They do have to do the whole thing. We had one on my course. They’re a valuable asset to have in any YO Batch. Ours went on to become a Brigadier.

Granted it’s from 1987 but this programme following a YO batch had three Corps Commissions in it, starting from Day One Week One, this how you wash and shave, all the way through to the Commando tests. Isn’t it described as one of the great levellers of the RM, is that everyone does the same, commissioned or not?

I’d be well choked at having to do the Thirty Miler again though...
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
Yes, you can commission from the ranks. 7 or 8% of the OCdts on average have done just that. However, there are hurdles to cross and it depends on the unit you join. Typically, they will have served 5 or more years and made it to Cpl or beyond (though the youngest I've seen had only served 2 years).
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer

Granted it’s from 1987 but this programme following a YO batch had three Corps Commissions in it, starting from Day One Week One, this how you wash and shave, all the way through to the Commando tests. Isn’t it described as one of the great levellers of the RM, is that everyone does the same, commissioned or not?

I’d be well choked at having to do the Thirty Miler again though...
'Lympestone Halt' :)
 

Granted it’s from 1987 but this programme following a YO batch had three Corps Commissions in it, starting from Day One Week One, this how you wash and shave, all the way through to the Commando tests. Isn’t it described as one of the great levellers of the RM, is that everyone does the same, commissioned or not?

I’d be well choked at having to do ‘any of it’ again though...
Fixed
 
Three letter name beginning with F ? :)

( seemed like a good guy, came close to telling 2SL (Brighouse) not to be so ignorant....)
Do you mean our Corps Commission chap? No, an Italian name beginning with S. Had a brother in the Corps too, SBS, who died sadly in a parachuting accident I believe.
 

QRK2

LE
The giveaway on a small but significant number of Corps commissioned is the presence of the King's Badge.
 

needlewaver

War Hero
The giveaway on a small but significant number of Corps commissioned is the presence of the King's Badge.
Does that still infer a six month seniority for promotion?
 
Right genuine question. Can someone join the army as a regular soldier then later on in your career, whilst still being in the army, go to Sandhurst and become and Officer?
Yes. If you're serving, ask you chain of command for a copy of Army Commissioning Regulations 2019 (AC13452); it is all contained in there, but in sum:

To become a DE Officer, you must pass AOSB and be under the age of 30 prior to starting RMAS

To become an LE Officer, you must have 9 years reckonable service from age 21, or date of enlistment (whichever is later), selected by an ASB and complete LEOC within 18 months of commissioning.

For soldiers attempting the DE commissioning process, you will be required to provide evidence of security vetting to SC level, or BPSS if SC is not held, AF B227 (Report on a Candidate for Officer Training) endorsed by your CO, GCSE (or equivalent) certificates or a recommendation following an educational assessment at the Army School of Education, plus medical records.

Your cap badge will have it's own process for how it puts you through the process and assesses you, puts you forward for AOSB Briefing and AOSB etc - but once you're over that hurdle, most of it is online.

First thing is to speak to your chain of command and check you can meet the standards. Good luck.
 

Terrafir

Crow
Yes. If you're serving, ask you chain of command for a copy of Army Commissioning Regulations 2019 (AC13452); it is all contained in there, but in sum:

To become a DE Officer, you must pass AOSB and be under the age of 30 prior to starting RMAS

To become an LE Officer, you must have 9 years reckonable service from age 21, or date of enlistment (whichever is later), selected by an ASB and complete LEOC within 18 months of commissioning.

For soldiers attempting the DE commissioning process, you will be required to provide evidence of security vetting to SC level, or BPSS if SC is not held, AF B227 (Report on a Candidate for Officer Training) endorsed by your CO, GCSE (or equivalent) certificates or a recommendation following an educational assessment at the Army School of Education, plus medical records.

Your cap badge will have it's own process for how it puts you through the process and assesses you, puts you forward for AOSB Briefing and AOSB etc - but once you're over that hurdle, most of it is online.

First thing is to speak to your chain of command and check you can meet the standards. Good luck.
This is really helpful. Thanks.
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
Yes. If you're serving, ask you chain of command for a copy of Army Commissioning Regulations 2019 (AC13452); it is all contained in there, but in sum:

To become a DE Officer, you must pass AOSB and be under the age of 30 prior to starting RMAS

To become an LE Officer, you must have 9 years reckonable service from age 21, or date of enlistment (whichever is later), selected by an ASB and complete LEOC within 18 months of commissioning.

For soldiers attempting the DE commissioning process, you will be required to provide evidence of security vetting to SC level, or BPSS if SC is not held, AF B227 (Report on a Candidate for Officer Training) endorsed by your CO, GCSE (or equivalent) certificates or a recommendation following an educational assessment at the Army School of Education, plus medical records.

Your cap badge will have it's own process for how it puts you through the process and assesses you, puts you forward for AOSB Briefing and AOSB etc - but once you're over that hurdle, most of it is online.

First thing is to speak to your chain of command and check you can meet the standards. Good luck.
Actually, you can get a waiver for age (and educational qualifications, too). The oldest OCdt I know of was was 34 and had a particularly attractive skill-set.
 

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