can you become an officer if you join as a soldier

Hello everyone I am posting here to find out if I could join the army as a soldier and then go to sandhurst afterwards. I intended to study hnc Business but the course was cancelled due to lack of interest. Any help would be highly appreciated.
 
Yes. If you fit the requirements - ed. quals, age, etc and pass the selection process. Some support from your CoC will be useful too.

We've just sent an excellent young man, a Lance Corporal, off in that direction. He started at RMAS a week or so ago.
 
It is easier to go direct to Sandhurst than going through depot, getting to battalion, getting the requisite recommendations, completing PODS then going to RMAS.

It will take less time, will avoid the awkward moment if you did not get recommended. You will not have to spend a couple of years with idiot 18 year old privates, getting messed around etc.

If you want to be an officer, go down that route, if you want to be a soldier, go down that route. Go for AOSB, then if you fail, reconsider. There are many OR jobs that are great.
 

Boris_Johnson

ADC
Moderator
DirtyBAT
Hello everyone I am posting here to find out if I could join the army as a soldier and then go to sandhurst afterwards. I intended to study hnc Business but the course was cancelled due to lack of interest. Any help would be highly appreciated.

Think very carefully about this - especially what you want out of your military career.

I'd had the opportunity to go DE relatively early on in my career and was encouraged as such; attended many of the briefings, fully familiarised myself with the process etc. Ultimately though, when it came down to it - I turned my back on it (what was known then as RCB).

The logic behind my decision (assuming I'd pass RCB and Sandhurst), was that I knew being relatively young I wouldn't know too much about the world; I was bound to make mistakes and didn't want my mistakes to have repercussions on those I'm responsible for (i.e. as a Pl Comd). So I opted to go through the ranks, with the option of applying for a Late Entry (LE) Commission once I hit WO1 / WO2... One big problem with that however, is that nobody told me that the jobs they offer LEs are not as desirable and the DE will always out-trump an LE for a more prestigious command.

It never really occurred to me to re-apply once I'd spent a few years in the ranks and still go through the DE process as, say, a Cpl (or indeed before I was 29 years old). I was too busy having a great time and enjoying my job, going on tour, courses, exercises and travelling the world.

When I look at the Board Proceedings these days however, and look at the Blue List and Green List (Col / Brig) every now and then I see a name I recognise as a young subby from my early days - and can't help wondering "what if".

I don't regret anything I've done, and fully enjoyed my time - and strictly speaking, you shouldn't follow something you don't have your heart in and are not prepared to commit to fully 100%

At the same time, if there's an opportunity out there to get the very best out of something - don't pass it up. The worst thing that can happen is that you find you're not suitable, and you turn elsewhere. **But** at least you will know for definite, and not have that little niggle in the back of your mind every once in a while that says "what if"

I hope that (somehow) helps, and good luck, regardless of which direction you take.
 
Thank you everyone for the advice. I guess i will just be patient and wait for the august entry for college then i can go to Sandhurst afterwards. Once again thank you for your replies.
 

25pdr

Old-Salt
I'm ex TA REME Craftsman and RAF Flight Lieutenant. Not at all connected but always amuses Pongo pals :)

I'd tend to agree with fraudstar, particularly inasmuch as you have to obtain your commander's recommendation to proceed with selection.
Good luck! I'd apply for AAC ;)
 
There was a guy in the squad before mine passed out of depot as a lance jack, I got a shock on my second posting 3 years later to find he was my Company Adjutant!
 
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Given enough time in you can go all the way :-D

Ralph Darling

Born Ireland 1772, son of Quartermaster Christopher Darling of 45th Foot; Private in 45th Foot 1786; served in West Indies 1793 to 1799; Ensign in 45th Foot 15 May 1793; Lieutenant 2 September 1795; Captain in 27th Foot 6 September 1796; Major in 4th West India Regiment 2 February 1800; Lieutenant-Colonel in 69th Foot 17 July 1801; exchanged to 51st Foot 8 May 1806; commanded 51st Foot 1806 to 1811; served in Peninsula October 1808 to January1809; Deputy Assistant Adjutant-General Walcheren 1809; brevet Colonel 25 July 1810; on staff positions 1810 to 1813; subsequently Major-General 4 June1813; Governor of Mauritius 1818 to 1823; Colonel of 90th Foot 9 October1823; Governor of New South Wales 1824 to 1831; Lieutenant-General 27 May 1825; General 23 November 1841; died at Brighton in 1858.
 
Given enough time in you can go all the way :-D

Ralph Darling

Born Ireland 1772, son of Quartermaster Christopher Darling of 45th Foot; Private in 45th Foot 1786; served in West Indies 1793 to 1799; Ensign in 45th Foot 15 May 1793; Lieutenant 2 September 1795; Captain in 27th Foot 6 September 1796; Major in 4th West India Regiment 2 February 1800; Lieutenant-Colonel in 69th Foot 17 July 1801; exchanged to 51st Foot 8 May 1806; commanded 51st Foot 1806 to 1811; served in Peninsula October 1808 to January1809; Deputy Assistant Adjutant-General Walcheren 1809; brevet Colonel 25 July 1810; on staff positions 1810 to 1813; subsequently Major-General 4 June1813; Governor of Mauritius 1818 to 1823; Colonel of 90th Foot 9 October1823; Governor of New South Wales 1824 to 1831; Lieutenant-General 27 May 1825; General 23 November 1841; died at Brighton in 1858.

I see your Darling, darling and raise you a FM Sir William 'Wully' Robertson, the only man to rise from private soldier to the top of the tree:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_William_Robertson,_1st_Baronet
 
Given enough time in you can go all the way :-D

Ralph Darling

Born Ireland 1772, son of Quartermaster Christopher Darling of 45th Foot; Private in 45th Foot 1786; served in West Indies 1793 to 1799; Ensign in 45th Foot 15 May 1793; Lieutenant 2 September 1795; Captain in 27th Foot 6 September 1796; Major in 4th West India Regiment 2 February 1800; Lieutenant-Colonel in 69th Foot 17 July 1801; exchanged to 51st Foot 8 May 1806; commanded 51st Foot 1806 to 1811; served in Peninsula October 1808 to January1809; Deputy Assistant Adjutant-General Walcheren 1809; brevet Colonel 25 July 1810; on staff positions 1810 to 1813; subsequently Major-General 4 June1813; Governor of Mauritius 1818 to 1823; Colonel of 90th Foot 9 October1823; Governor of New South Wales 1824 to 1831; Lieutenant-General 27 May 1825; General 23 November 1841; died at Brighton in 1858.

H was a bit of a B*stard though.
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Darling
 
This is a very-very uncertain route and has no guarantees. Personalities, situations and being in the right place at the right time is part of the mix.
If you have the skills and abilities to go to Sandhurst do it, don't for heaven's sake play Russian roulette in the ranks.
With the cuts and uncertainty in HMF at the moment its all in the air, there are no certainties.
 
^. Wot he said. It's easier to close an open door, than to force your way past a locked one.
 
My 10c based on personal experience, is to go for officer up front (even delaying an application if necessary) rather then go through the ranks.

My reasons based on my direct experience:

1. Some people (especially SNCOs) will attempt to push you through SNCO routes, especially if there is a shortage.

2. Any minor misdemeanor or error of judgement will get hauled in front of you in the selection board. Same with annual reports etc. The army will have seen more of you than they will a civilian, and it might not be good.

3. You will be judged as a serving member and the board (and training staff) will expect you to perform as such. Having a drill pig scream at you "come on Bumhole, you have being doing this for years and you still can't get it right" isn't a good start to the day.

Only my opinion.
 

BratMedic

LE
Book Reviewer
Enoch Powell is a good example of coming up through the ranks. For a few weeks he was the youngest brigadier in the British Army, and he was one of only two men in the entire war to rise from private to brigadier.
 

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